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Range/Stove/Oven/Broiler Info, Leak Detection, Fault Codes, Fuel Conversion & Links

Range/Stove/Oven/Broiler Info, Leak Detection, Fault Codes, Fuel Conversion & Links

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  #1  
Old 02-21-04, 09:10 AM
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Arrow Range/Stove/Oven/Broiler Info, Leak Detection, Fault Codes, Fuel Conversion & Links

Hello and Welcome to the "Gas Appliances" forum topic.

Below is basic help information pertaining to ranges, stoves, ovens and broilers. Taken from multiple sources, basic appliance diagnostic services, minor repair methods and procedures for the do it yourself handy persons.

It's highly suggested reading the owners manual, a repair manual, the manufacturers web site for problem causes, service and or repair instructions in downloadable pdf files and the basics before assuming there is a mechanical problem or part failure prior to attempting any repairs.

Safety Concerns:
If you smell gas, do not try to light pilots, if you are not positive a pilot light is the cause of the odor. If you smell gas at, near or around any appliances and are not sure you know where it is coming from, get help.

Do not turn on or turn off any electrical switch. Immediately contact your gas supplier. If you cannot contact the gas supplier, call the local fire department. Do not use or store gasoline, flammable liquids or any products which produce flammable vapors near any gas appliance.

TOP BURNERS:
Top burners that do not light from a pilot flame or from properly operating ignition sparkers, is more likely and most oftenly caused by restricted ignition ports.

If the sparkers are funtioning and the burners won't lite, chances are the burner head openings and or ignition ports on the burner heads are clogged up with debris.

If this is the case, the flames will not burn completely around the entire circumference of the burner head. The burner head openings which do not have flames are clogged up and need cleaning.

If the pilot flame and or sparking ignitor is located between two seperate burner heads. Each burner having a tube (flash tube) extending from it leading to the pilot or spark ignitor.

Top burners that do not light entirely around the circumference of the top burner head have blocked and or restricted burner ports. The ports are the holes, slots or openings the flames appear through. Ignition ports can be found on the side of the burner head where the pilot or sparker is located.

Not all top burners have ignition ports. Some have direct ignition. Direct ignition means the sparking element is located directly in-line and across from the burner head. Most often cleaning and clearing any restrictions in the ignition ports or burner ports resolves ignition and burner problems.

Ignition ports are tiny holes up one side of the burner head. If these holes are restricted, they must be cleared out. Cleaning can be accomplished using sewing pin needle. Do not enlarge the ignition holes. Doing so will have adverse burner lighting effects.

In cases of extremely dirty burner heads, soaking the burners in very hot water with plenty of dissolved automatic dishwasher detergent for several hours, rinsing and drying or a combination of both methods for heavily soiled burners.

In some cases, burners can or must be removed. There will be tiny screws securing the burners to the stove. The screws must be removed. There is also likely to be a tab at the burner head. The tabed end will fit into a slot to secure that end.

The other end of the burner tube will be slipped over the orifice on the gas manifold. Removing a burner is a simple process of removing one attaching screw and slipping out the entire burner.

Once the 4 burners are removed, turn them upside down in the dishwashers rack and wash with other pots and pans items as usual. If there is a heavy amount of devris either on the burners or in the ports or slots, a common straight pin needle can be used to pre-clean before these parts are put into the dishwasher. Only precaution is not to enlarge the holes or slots.

The dish washing cleaning detergent will help to clean the burner heads, etc. The drying process will automatically dry the burners as it does the rest of of any items normally washed in the dishwasher.

Once this process is completed, simply reverse the removal process to reinstall the burners being sure to install each burner back into it's exact location and exactly as it was originally installed.

If the burner openings appear not to have gas coming out of them, try lighting the burner with a match. If the burner fails to lite because there isn't any gas coming out of the burner head, there may be a restriction in the burner tube or the brass orifice.

If the above is the case, clear the burner tube. If the brass orifice is clogged up, clear it with a pin but do not remove it, if possible nor enlarge the openings.

TOP BURNER CONSTANT BURNING PILOTS:
Constant burning pilots must be correctly sized and burning properly. A properly burning pilot flame will have a blue base. Many will have a tiny yellow tip. The entire flame size should be about the size of a stick match head.

The cup surrounding the flame must be cleaned and the air holes around the cups base must be opened and cleared of debris. Many pilot cup assemblies have stems from which the flame burns. The stem must be fully cleared of debris.

Clearing the stem can be accomplished by extinguishing the flame and leaving the gas on. Inserting a fine piece of wire into the stem often works best. Careful attention must be taken to avoid breaking the stem. Upon completion, simply relite the flame.

TOP BURNER ELECTRIC SPARK IGNITORS:
Failures of electric spark ignitors to function at all and or operate in any sporatic or erratic manner can be caused by several possibilites. Below is the most common of possible problem possibilities.

When one or more sparkers sparks continuously, it's possible one of the switches on the top burner valves is stuck in the closed position completing the circuit.

Determining which one requires the removal of the wires attached to the switchs, each one done seperately and individually, one at a time. A continuity test can also determine which sparker switch is defective. The electrical power must be turned off prior to testing.

Any one of the individual sparkers could be a defective part. Each sparker has a wire that pulls off the sparkers element body. The one that stops the sparking is most likely the culprit.

If all the sparkers are sparking when the stove isn't in operation, the most likely cause is a defective capacitor in the spark modual. The entire spark modual must be replaced.

Spark moduals are non serviceable and non repairable. Replacements are available at any local appliance retail parts store listed in the phone book.

Another possibility causing sparkers to spark continuously, is moisture during a recent cleaning process found it's way onto one or more of the switches. Excessively wet sponges or cleaning cloths allow water and or excessive moisture to get onto the switches.

If this happens to be the case, drying out the moisture often corrects this condition. Remove the knobs and lift the lid, if applicable. Not all stoves have liftable top lids.

Remove any clear plastic covers on the valve stems, if applicable and pass warm air over the switches using a hair blow dryer. The idea here is to dry out the moisture, if there is any.

Another cause could be reversed electrical polarity. The plug end will have 3 prongs. It must be directly connected into a properly wired and grounded wall recepticle. Not all wall outlet recepticules are properly grounded.

Reversed electrical polarity will damage the spark module. Which can cause the sparkers to spark continuously when the appliance is not in use or not spark at all. A new modual replacement must be installed. The electrical problem at the wall recepticule corrected.

Do not use 2 prong extension cords to lenghten the existing appliances 3 prong electrical cord. Do not bypass the grounding pin on the end of the appliances electrical cord. Damage to the spark module will result.

COMMON OVEN and BROILER PROBLEMS:
Oven burners that do not lite from the there ignition sources, regardless of which type of ignition source is used, can be caused by several factors. Every variation in details would be too much to provide here in one article.

One of the most common causes for burner ignition failures is the fact that natural gas contains trace chemicals which does not burn completely. Not burning completely leaves behind residues, in the form of a white powdery substance.

Cleaning the burners ignition and burner ports of this residue, near the ignition source, often restores proper burner ignition operation.

Burners made of iron or cast iron deteriorate. Minor deposits of 'Rust and Corrosion' must be removed to insure proper operations. Rust and scale deposits can be removed with steel wool or a wire brush. Burner removal is often required to accomplish this task.

Burners made of metal and coated with a polished chrome like finish also deteriorate, corrode and rust as the coating finish wears. Cleaning can be best accomplished, as mentioned above.

For cases of severe burner distortions, do to age, rusting, scalings & deteriorations, the entire burner must be replaced to restore proper ignition, flame characteristics and heat distribution.

Burners made of aluminum are prone to all of the same conditions as metal burners. Aluminum burners are also prone to warping from the heat generated. Warping requires burner replacement. Cleaning can be accomplished in the same manner as iron or cast iron burners.

Whether the appliance has a hot surface glow bar ignitor or any type of pilot lighting ignition system where the burner fails to light or does not light completely around the entire length of the burner, clearing and cleaning the restrictions near the ignition source and the burner slots, holes or ports insures positive lighting and burning.

Oven burners also have crossover ports. Cross over ports or slots allow the burner flames to light both sides of the burner. If a burner fails to light on both sides of the burner or completely around the burner, the cross-over ports or slots are blocked or restricted.

Cross-over ports or slots are either near the ignition source or somewhere along the length of the burner. When an oven burner fails to light completely around the burner or on both sides of the burner, check all ports and or slots for any obstructions on the entire oven burner. Doing so will ensure proper ignition, no gas smell and even heating in the baking compartment.

Symptoms of burners which fail to burn completely around and or along there entire burner surface can usually be seen through the broiler or ovens glass viewing window to help pre determine there location. In all cases, the smell of gas while the oven burner is on can be detected. Neither instance is safe. The condition must be corrected immediately.

OVEN & BROILER HOT SURFACE GLOWING IGNITERS: (HSI)
Do not assume the hot surface glow ignitor isn't turning on or functioning simply because it fails to glow. Always check the control panel for proper settings and selections before beginning repairs or part replacements.

Be sure there is electrical power to the appliance. Be sure the clock is set in manual operation, if the clock has this option. Be sure all control functions and selections are properly set, not set in a timed bake selection or kepp warm cycle. Set to the manual selection.

A properly functioning hot surface glow bar igniter will glow an intense bright yellow orange in color. Too much orange, any reddish color or a dull orange color indicates the glow coil is weak. A weak coil needs to be replaced just as much as a burned out non functioning coil in order for the burner to operate correctly.

Hot surface ignitors last on average only a few years. Older parts should be replaced, if suspected of not functioning properly. Hot surface glow ignitors are typically the most common causes for ovens and or broilers not to function.

Hot surface glow ignitors are electrical using devices which are non refundable parts. Be sure the hot surface ignitor is the cause of the problem. They are also one of the easiest parts to replace as a first line attempt to correct some problems.

Ovens with touch pad controls use electronic computerized circuit boards. The entire circuit board could be removed and taken to the local appliance parts dealer for testing and or replacement.

Some manufacturers install fuses in the electrical circuitry. Fuses can become weak, burn out or blow out. Check for fuses and test them for continuity.

Replacement with a new fuse insures proper operation. Be aware that appliances fuses are not ordinary fuses. They are a specialty part, specifically made and designed for the intended purpose.

Continuous Clean Oven Repair and Care:
http://doityourself.com/gasapp/ovencontinuous.htm

Conventional Oven Repair and Care:
http://doityourself.com/gasapp/ovencare.htm

SQUEAKY DOOR HINGES:
Prior Questions Asked And Replied To On This Subject:

http://forum.doityourself.com/editpo...&postid=561050

http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...hreadid=153135

TIP:
Bare in mind, the only positive proof any part is functioning correctly, is to carefully remove the part or parts you suspect to be the potential culprits. Have the local appliance parts store person test or inspect to help make the final determination. Doing so will save time & money replacing unneeded and non returnable parts.

CAUTIONS & CONSIDERATIONS:
If you attempt to do any repairs, be sure the electrical power is turned off or the appliance is unplugged. Turn off the gas at a shut-off valve on the gas inlet supply pipe.

If you choose not to do the repairs yourself, contact the dealer's local service agency. Professional service with a labor and parts warranty may be adviseable in some cases and for some complex appliances & problems or conditions.

Some gas supply companies provide some or all services. Contact your gas supplier to inquire. Their phone number will be on the billing statement. Basic maintenance procedures are given in the manufacturers provided owners manual.

SUGGESTIONS:
Read the manufacturers online web site for product information, problem causes, solving methods, part locations, repair procedures, pictorials, schematics, downloadable repair and or owners manuals which may be available online.

Questions and answers pertaining to gas piping and connections to appliances can can found in the Plumbing Forum:
http://forum.doityourself.com/forumd...php?forumid=31

DIY'S Gas Appliances Pages:
Ranges, Stoves, Ovens and Appliance Tips.
http://doityourself.com/gasapp/index.shtml

DIY Links:
http://links.doityourself.com/
http://links.doityourself.com/links/appliances/

Consumer Reports Homepage:
http://www.consumerreports.org/main/home.jsp

Consumer Reports Appliances:
http://www.consumerreports.org/main...D=1119643966105

Manufacturers Web Sites:

Sears:
http://www.sears.com

Sears Search Site:
http://www3.sears.com

Whirlpool's Home Web Site: (Also makes appliances for Sears)
http://www.whirlpool.com

Maytag Appliance Home Page:
http://www.maytag.com
Maytag 1-800-688-9900 USA
Maytag 1-800-688-2002 Canada
Maytag is also the maker of Amana, Jenn-Air, Magic Chef and Caloric Appliances.

General Electric:
http://www.ge.com

Whirlpool:
http://www.whirlpool.com

Jen Air:
http://www.jennair.com

Amana:
http://www.amana.com

Bosch:
http://www.boschappliances.com

Roper:
http://www.roperappliances.com

Peerless-Premier Ranges Home Page
http://www.premierrange.com/index.htm

Kitchenaid:
http://www.kitchenaid.com

Miele:
http://www.miele.co.

Electrolux:
http://www.electrolux.com

Frigidaire:
http://www.frigidare.com

Staber:
http://www.staber.com

Advertisers and Sponsors Pages:

Appliance Parts, Pictures & Help:
http://www.PartSelect.com

Appliance PartsPro Home Page:
http://www.appliancepartspros.com/index.aspx

Appliances Parts & Help:
http://www.pcappliancerepair.com

Kitchen Appliance Parts:
http://www.parts-depot.online.com

DIY'S Gas Appliances, Parts, Installation Supplies and More:
http://doityourself.com/store/plumbing.htm

DIY'S Gas Appliances Pages:
Ranges, Stoves, Ovens and Appliance Tips.
http://doityourself.com/gasapp/index.shtml

DIY Appliance Repair:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Thermador Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Jenn Air:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Cooking Ranges and Stoves:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Frigidaire Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Ranges and Hoods:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...ysprune=60&f=1

Bosch Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...sprune=60&f=67

Major Kitchen Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...sprune=60&f=67

The above helpful information will be edited and or updated as needed. Check back often.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-17-04, 09:14 PM
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Arrow Oven Fault Codes

Whirlpool:
Range/Stove Oven Fault Codes, Common
F5 - E0 F5 - E1 and E2 - Check door/latch switch - Replace switch if defective.

Range/Stove Oven Fault Codes, Common
F3 - Oven too hot - Replace oven temperature sensor
F3 - Clean temp too hot - Replace oven temperature sensor.

MAGIC CHEF:
Range, Stove, Oven Fault Codes:
F3 F4 - Open or shorted oven temperature sensor - Part Needs Replacement.

MAGIC CHEF
Range/Stove/Oven Fault Codes
F5 - Hardware and watchdog circuits disagree - Replace clock assembly (also called the ERC).

MAYTAG
Type "C" and "D" Clocks Range/Stove/Oven Fault Codes
F5 - Supervisory relay enable open (cook mode); sounds alarm and resets the control to non-cook mode - Replace electronic range control (ERC).

MAYTAG
Range/Stove/Oven Fault Codes
F5 - Hardware and watchdog circuits disagree - Replace clock assembly (also called the ERC).

ROPER
Range/Stove/Oven Fault Codes
NOTE: Not valid for Y line. If there is a Y near the end of your model number, do not use this chart.

F1 & E1 - Safety flip flop - Replace Electronic Range Control/Clock (ERC)

F0 or F1 or F5 - Failed Electronic Range Control (ERC) - Replace Electronic Range Control/Clock (ERC)

F2 or E0 - Oven temp too high
1. Test operation of door lock on self-clean models
2. Test relay contact operation
3. High resistance in oven temperature sensor

ROPER
Range/Stove Oven- Alternative 2 Digit Fault Codes

F1 - Analog to Digital Failure Disconnect for 30 seconds - if display re-appears - replace control
F1 - Safety flip flop - Replace component
F1 - Shorted keypad - Replace component

F2 - Oven temperature sensor shorted - Replace oven temperature sensor

ROPER
Range/Stove Oven BES, BEP models

F2 - Bake/Clean temperature runaway alarm
1. Allow unit to sit for one hour to cool down
2. Place oven temperature sensor in a glass of ice water
3. Measure oven temperature sensor resistance. The oven temperature sensor should measure about 1000 ohms while in the ice water
If the oven temperature sensor is good but the problem remains replace the electronic range control (ERC)
If the oven temperature sensor is bad, replace it.

Roper
Range/Stove 24" Built-In Self-Clean Wall Oven

F2 - Oven temperature above specifications - 8-pin connector oven temperature sensor to the Electronic Range Control (ERC)

GENERAL ELECTRIC FAULT CODES:
GE Fault Codes Older Models:

Display Condition Repair
F0 and F1 Failed Thermistor Control Replace ERC

F2 Oven Temp Exceeds 590 w/unlocked door High restistance or interference in sensor.

F3 Open sensor circuit Measure, should be approx. 1100 ohms

F8 Component failure Replace Control

F9 Program w/door circuit. Check Wiring.

Older GE Model Codes 1999 & Back:

Failure Code Meaning Suspect/Check FFF Control Error, Failed EEPROM Replace Control

FO or F7 Shorted Clear/Off Key due to membrane switch, Control or connector Shorted key panel membrane switch ERC

F2 During Bake Control senses oven temp above 615 degrees F High resistance connection in sensor circuit.

ERC- Welded bake relay contacts.
Both lock switch 1 & 2 closed at the same time.

F3 Open sensor, Sensor resistance exceeds 2900 ohms during Bake, Broil or Clean Sensor/ Sensor Circuit connections.

F4 Shorted sensor, Sensor resistance less than 2900 ohms during Bake, Broil or Clean Sensor/ Sensor Circuit connections.

FF Door motor saftey ciruit ERC

Generic Fault Codes:
F5 - E0 F5 - E1 and E2 - Check door/latch switch - Replace component.
 
  #3  
Old 11-19-04, 06:22 PM
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Arrow Oven Gas Odors-Only When Oven Is On-Information

Ovens that have a gas odor only when on, do so for three common reasons.

1)
The aluminium tube that supplies gas to the burner gas valve usually comes from the thermostat. Which means, on some models, the burner gas flows through the thermostat to the burner. One those models the likely hood is the tubing nuts are leaking. No gas flows throguh the tube(s) unless the oven is on and the burner flames are visable.

2)
The burner itself is not adjusted correctly or not all the ports (holes or slots) in the burner have flames coming out of them. The ones without flames may not be lit but gas is still coming out of them. They cannot light because one or more of them is clogged with debris so that hole, slot or port isn't light and cannot light the next one down the line.

3)
One side of the burner is light but not the other side of the burner. That's because the cross over port, holes and or slot is clogged up. Which means the pilot or ignition lights one side of the burner only. The other side lights from the cross over port to light the opposite side of the burner.

The cleaning aspect you are likely to be able to resolve. Be sure all holes, or slots on the burner has flames. Those which do not are clogged. Clean them to open them. Same applies to the cross over ports, holes or slot.

The leak at the tubing nuts will require you tighten the nuts. Using caution so as not to break or damage the part the nut screws into. Will need a backup wrench or grips to hold the part inplace while tightening the nut(s).

Best leak detection method is to use "Leak Detection Soap." Mix per instructions. Not having that, a soapy water solution made from commonly used dish soap will do fine. A slightly thick mixture to insure the soapy water remains on the parts and will still allow bubbles to form. A small cupful will do fine for the purpose.

Retail appliance parts dealers can also help determine what the possible problem may be. Bring the make, model and serial numbers. Appliance part stores and dealers are listed in the phone book.
 
  #4  
Old 11-12-05, 06:29 AM
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Arrow Fuel Conversion Information

NATURAL GAS TO PROPANE GAS:

If the stove is currently set up to burn natural gas and currently connected to propane, the burners would burn very large, appear or actually burn yellow, because the burner orifices holes are too large. Natural gas orifices have holes sized for natural gas, which are too large for propane fuel.

To convert the stove to propane, the orifices must be either replaced or turned inwards to reduce the hole size. In some cases the orifices can be screwed opened or closed to adjust the burners flame size but not always. Some orifices are non adjustable. They turn but no adjustment results. In these cases, orifice replacements are needed.

On most older stoves the orifices are adjustable while on some they still are not adjustable. The orifices are the brass or bronze hex nuts onto which the burner tubes are set. There is also adjustable air shutters on each burner tube at all the burners.

To make the conversion where orifice replacement is required, the first thing you have to know is what the burners are rated at. Inside or on the stove somewhere is a plate containing all the required information. Once you have this information, write down the stoves information and visit the local retail appliance parts store for replacement parts. The appliance stores counter service person will be able to determine orifice sizes required.

Another item that will need attention, is the gas regulator. This part is located where the incoming fuel line is connected to the appliance. If the existing regulator isn't convertable between natural gas and propane, the part will also need to be replaced. Failure to convert or replace the regulator for the type of gas used will create burner operational problem, etc.

Another item the has to be set correctly is the ovens thermostat. Most of these have a set screw on the body of the thermostat near the stem behind the temp knob. The screw will be labled...N or Nat for natural gas. P or LP for propane. Turn the set screw to the type of fuel used.

Suggestions:
Read the manufacturers online web site for product information, problem possibilities, causes and solving methods, part locations, disassembly, reassembly methods, repair proceedures and instructions, fuel type conversions, pictorials and schematics, which may be available online.

An excellent source for orginal replacement parts is your local retail appliance parts store. Appliance parts dealers carry replacement parts for all appliances. Parts dealers are listed in the phone book under appliances.

Read the prior postings on this fuel conversion topic, within this forum and the replies offered within them. You'll find instructions to make the conversion already in them.

PROPANE TO NATURAL GAS:

What has to be done is a conversion to propane from natural gas. Which means all the existing burner orifices have to be replaced with propane orifices. Or screwed inwards to reduce the burners flame size. Propane gas orifices have holes sized for propane fuel, which is too small for natural gas fuel. The appliance regulator has to be converted also.

Later model stoves have regulators that are convertible. It's simply a matter of turning over the tower cap on the regulator. Some appliance regulators have levers or set screws that have to be turned from one postion to another. Look for the letter markings, "LP" or "Nat." Older stoves that do not have convertible regulators, the entire regulator must be replaced.

Failure to convert the appliance from natural gas to propane, while using propane, will result in excessively large burner flames, which will cause soot and produce carbon monoxides, etc. Best bet is to convert the appliance before connecting it to the new fuel source.

Read the prior postings on this fuel conversion topic, within this forum, for other postings and the replies offered. You'll find instructions to make the conversion already posted.

NATURAL GAS TO PROPANE:

What has to be done is a conversion from natural gas to propane gas. Which means all the existing burner orifices have to be replaced with propane gas orifices and the appliance regulator has to be converted also. The reverse of above.

Later model stoves have regulators that are convertible. It's simply a matter of turning over the tower cap on the regulator. Some appliance regulators have levers or set screws that have to be turned from one postion to another. Look for the letter markings, "LP" or "Nat" on the regulator body. Older stoves that do not have convertible regulators, the entire regulator must be replaced.

Failure to convert the appliance from natural gas to propane, while using propane, will result in excessively large burner flames, which will cause soot and produce carbon monoxides, etc. Best bet is to convert the appliance before connecting it to the new fuel source.

Oven and broiler burner adjustment:

Flames should be not more than one inch from the outter edges of the flame spreader. The flame spreader is the flat plate the sets on top of the burner tube. Adjust the orifice inwards or outwards until the flame tips are about 1 and 1/2 inches to 2 inches inwards from the outter edges of flame spreader is ideal.

If the flames appear yellow or have yellowed tips, adjust the air shutter on the burner just above the orifice to allow slightly more air to enter. But not so much to cause flames to lift off of the burner and blow outwards with force.

Read the prior postings on this fuel conversion topic, within this forum, for other postings and the replies offered. You'll find instructions to make the conversion already posted.

OVEN THERMOSTAT COVERSIONS:

There should be 2 markings on the valve body indicating each of the fuel positions. LP for propane and NAT for natural. There may also be a tiny lever or set screw on the thermostat control valve. This valve will be behind the thermostats temperature knob.

To gain access to it, remove the thermostats temperature knob by pulling it forward. Then look behind the knob for either of the two conversion markings. Set the slotted set screw to the correct fuel type.

If screwing down the oven/broiler orifice did not control the size of the burner flames, that orifice is not likely to be an adjustable one. Here is a means to determine if that orifice is or is not adjustable. The burner needs to be removed from the gas control valve. The burners tube ending sits on the gas valve.

The other end of the burner is secured to the front of the oven. Rests on a ledge or lip at the base of the access door. There will be a cotton pin oe a screw securing it. Whichever it is, remove it. Than remove the burner by lifting it up and off the gas valve at the back of the oven/broiler area. Once removed, that brass or bronze hex nut thimble looking part is the orifice.

Unscrew it off the gas valve and remove it. Stick into the gas vlave should be a pointed raised sphare like part. If one is there, the orifice is adjustable. If none is there, the orifice is not adjustable. In this instance, the orifice needs to be replaced with an LP orifice. Note the btu rating for that specific burner on the rate plate.

At any local appliance parts store, a replacement orifice can be obtained for that btu rating in the size for propane fuel. Appliance parts dealers are listed in the phone book.

Once obtained, install that "LP" orifice as the other one was. Reinstall burner exactly as it was found prior to removal. Turn new orifice opened about 6 full turns from the lightly seated and closed position.

Relight pilot. Test burner flame size. Flames should not exceed flame spreader plate which is on top of burner attached with a wing nut. Flames should be not more than one inch from the outter edges of the flame spreader. Inwards 1 and 1/2 inches to 2 inches inwards from the outter edges of flame spreader is ideal.

If the flames appear yellow or have yellowed tips, adjust the air shutter on the burner just above the orifice to allow slightly more air to enter. But not so much to cause flames to lift off of the burner and blow outwards with force. Once correct orifice opening is set and the air shutter is set....your set...job done...

Be sure the electrical power to the appliance is turned off, before attempting any repairs. Always check for gas leaks when reconnecting any gas part.

Regards & Good Luck. Web Site Host, Forums Monitor, Gas Appliances Topic Moderator & Multiple Forums Moderator. Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.

Personal Safety Reminder:
Buckle Up & Drive Safely.
"The Life You Save, May Be Your Own."
 
  #5  
Old 11-30-05, 09:35 AM
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Hot Surface Glow Ignitors (HSI) & Gas Valves Info.

Used In Ovens and/or Broilers.

Many questions have been posted regarding problems concerning these two items. Knowing how they work may help understand how to correct those problems.

Carbonic lighters, commonly called glow ignitors, are made of highly compressed carbon material. This material has a measured value of resistance to the flow of electricity. It's this measured value of resistance that operates the ignition componets.

There are two styles of oven ignitors. One design is flat while the other is corkscrew shaped. Both are housed in a semi protective metal preforated case. Each type uses a quick disconnect electrical wire assembly.

The glow igntior must perform two functions. One is to open the gas valve and the second is to provide a positive source of ignition to ignite the burner gas.

When the thermostat contact points close, electric current is allowed to flow to the glow ignitor. Once the ignitor is fully energized it will glow an intense bright yellow orange in color. In order to provide positive ignition, the glow ignitor must obtain a temperature of approximately 1200-3000 degrees.

When the ignitor reaches that temperature it will be using all but 5 volts of the house current suppled to it. The remainder of the supplied current is allowed to pass through to the gas valve. That current then activates the gas valve and allows the gas to flow to the oven burner.

Should either of these parts (ignitor or gas valve) functions fail to perform, the oven will not operate. In the event you need to have either of these items checked, your local retail appliance parts store can test them for you. Often times it is best to replace both the glow ignitor and the gas valve when either one fails to operate properly.

Points to remember about glow ignitors:

If the ignitor doesn't glow:
Check the control panel settings FIRST.
Check for electric power at the clock, buzzer, or the wall plug.
If power is present, unplug the stove and check the fuse next.
The fuse may look fine but continuity through it must be verified. The fuse is a special type used only in glow ignitor ignition ovens.

Glow Ignitor Removing & InstallingTips:

Turn off the electric or unplug the appliance before replacing.
Handle the coil gently, they break easily and are non refundable.
Reinstall the new one EXACTLY as you found the orginal.

Gas Valve Operation:

When the glow ignitor allows the remainding 5 volts of the house current to flow to the valve, the gas will open and gas will flow to the burner.

With time, useage and age, the glow ignitor becomes weak, <it will appear to be mostly orange in color> it will not allow current to flow to the gas valve. When the coil is working correctly <it will appear an intense, bright yellow orange color> and the gas valve fails to open, the valve will need to be replaced.

Gas Valve Removal Tips:

Before removing an oven gas valve, turn off the GAS.
Unplug the appliance.
Remove the oven burner assembly off the gas valves orifice.
Remove the two electrical wires found on the valve.
Loosen the gas valve tubing nut before removing the gas valves anchoring device. <Use a backup wrench to hold the valve in place while turning the gas tubing nut.>

Gas Valve Reinstalling Tips:

Apply a light OIL on the threads of the inlet gas line tubing nut.
HAND start the threads before tightening with a wrench.
Secure the gas valve, then finish snuggly tightening the inlet nut.
Turn the gas supply back on. Check for leaks by SOAP testing the tubing nut.

Disclaimer:
This posting is for general componet knowledge and understanding. It is not meant to be all inclusive nor an instructional guide for diagnosing, testing, removing or installing these or any gas componets.

General Words Of Caution:
Appliances using either natural or propane gas, serviced, fixed or repaired incorrectly, can become a fire, explosion or carbon monoxide hazard.

Therefore, if your not sure you can safely and correctly make repairs to a gas appliance, consider leaving the repairs to a licensed and qualified appliance service technician.

Cautionary Note:
Before attempting any repairs, be sure to unplug the appliance from the wall receptacle power source first.

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  #6  
Old 11-30-05, 10:00 AM
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Replacing A Glow Ignitor

If an (HSI) hot surface ignitor is more than 2 years old or so, it has to be replaced with a new one if it fails to glow or does not glow hot enough. This part does not last all that long of a time period. Some last several years while others do not last more than 2 years or so.

Nor are are glow ignitors too expensive nor difficult to replace. And doing so is or should be a first attempt correctional method for the do it yourself person. Below is basic diy instructions how to replace an ignitor. (HSI)

Replacing the ignitor is most likely to resolve most problems when an oven fails to heat or a broiler fails to operate. Meaning the burner does not come on or remain on long enough for an oven to reach set temperature, etc

Be sure all the control panel selections are set correctly before replacing any part(s). If the ignitor is glowing but does not get glow hot enough to provide positive ignition to ignite the gas, the burner will not turn on.

***A hot glow ignitor, working correctly, will glow an intense bright yellow orange in color. Too much orange, any reddish color or a dull orange means the glow ignitor is weak. Replacing it often solves the problem.

If the ignitor in question is the hot surface glowing ignitor for one of two ovens, or an oven and or broiler switch them as a test. Removing the defective ignitor should not pose any difficulties. Usually one or two screws attaches it to the burner. Switch the good ignitor into the oven or broiler that does not work. If the oven or broiler now works, the removed ignitor is weak and/or defective.

Remove the defective ignitor, write down the model and serial numbers of that appliance and visit the local appliance parts store in your area. Purchase the replacement igntior and handle it very carefully. Ignitors break very easily....

Install the new ignitor exactly as you found the existing ignitor. Be advise that some new replacement ignitors do not come with quick disconnect ends. In this case, it's okay to cut off the quick disconnect from the old ignitor and attach it to the new ignitor.

Simply clip off the wires several inches above the disconnect on the old ignitor, attach to the wires of the new ignitor and wire nut the two ends together. Repeat the process to attach the other wire and wire nut that wire together. There is no positive nor negative {polarity} to be concerned with.

Position the new hot surface ignitor exactly as you find the existing one attached. Double check all electrical connections before turning the power back on or plugging in the appliance.

If it is required or necessary to remove the burner, besure the burner gets installed exactly as you find it prior to removal. The end of the burner tube with the air shutter adjustment must be installed back onto the gas valves bronze or brass orifice. Front attached to oven frame usually with a cotter pin.

Glowing hot surface ignitors are fragile & break easily as noted above. Handle and install the new ignitor very carefully. DO NOT touch the element with fingers or allow the surface to come into contact with any water and/or chemical, etc.

***Glowing hot surface ignitors are non refundable electric componets.

CAUTIONARY NOTE:
Be sure the electrical power to the appliance is turned off, before attempting any repairs. Appliance parts dealers are an excellent source for original replacement parts. Dealers are listed in the phone book under appliances.

TIP:
NEVER allow oven cleaning chemicals to come into contact with the HSI. Cover the HSI with a DRY cloth before using any spray oven cleaner or any such cleaners. An HSI that is sprayed or comes into contact with any chemicals or liquids burns out very quickly.

Read some or all of the already posted questions pertaining to ovens in this forum topic. Doing so will provide you with additional information on how to access the ignitor, remove the old one and install the replacement.

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  #7  
Old 12-24-05, 12:07 PM
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Arrow Helpful Information Link Pages!

United States Department Of Energy Home Site:
http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/your_home/

EIA Energy Gov. Information Center:
http://eia.doe.gov/

Natural Gas Web Site:
http://www.naturalgas.org/index.asp

Natural Gas Information Source:
http://www.naturalgas.com/

American Gas Association:
http://www.aga.org/

Benefits Of Natural Gas:
http://www.fuelingthefuture.org/cont...ThanEnergy.asp

Natural Gas Energy Information Administration:
http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/natur...tural_gas.html

All About Natural Gas:
http://www.bydesign.com/fossilfuels/...tural_gas.html

What You Need to Know About Natural Gas Detectors:
http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/smelltaste/gasdtctr.asp

Natural Gas Safety:
http://www.powerhousetv.com/stellent..._ga_index.hcsp

http://www.chenergygroup.com/news/NR_Oct4_2005.html

http://www.hsvutil.org/news/gassafety.shtml

http://www.charlottesville.org/defau...7-38C9269421EB

PGE Home Site-Safety-Find Your Gas Appliances:
http://www.pge.com/microsite/safety_.../activity.html

PGE Teachers Guide:
http://www.pge.com/microsite/safety_...ide/index.html

Tips on Efficiency, Conservation, and Appliance Selection.
Conservation Tips: http://www.socalgas.com/residential/interactivehome/
Reading The Meter: http://www.socalgas.com/residential/...html#readmeter
Emergency Information Page: http://www.socalgas.com/safety/emergency.shtml

Electrcial Energy Efficiency:
http://www.sce.com/_CustomerView/Res...al/default.htm

SCE HOME PAGE:
http://www.sce.com/

SCE SAFETY TIPS PAGE:
http://www.sce.com/Safety/

Appliance & Equipment Info:
http://www.negasco.com/home/appliance.php

Natural Gas In The Home:
http://www.atcogas.com/About_NG/NG_Home.asp

All About Gas Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/info/qnaplumbheatair.htm

Natural Gas Dryer Information:
http://forum.doityourself.com/showthread.php?t=159481

Natural Gas Energy Calculator (Provided By Wisconsin Gas)
http://www.wisconsinpublicservice.co...ppcalc_gas.asp

All Fossil Fuels Web Site: (Lots of info here)
http://www.bydesign.com/fossilfuels/links/index.html

How To Buy And Service Natural Gas Appliances:
http://www.cngcorp.com/products_tech...ppliances.html

Propane National Gas Association:
http://www.npga.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=1

Propane Energy Home Page:
http://usepropane.com/faq/

Fire Safety Manual And Information:
http://www.npga.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=962

Propane Gas Appliances Tune-up Page:
http://www.npga.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=692

Gas Check Program:
http://www.npga.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=574

Electric Dryers. How They Work Pages:
Home Page. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer.htm
Page 1. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer1.htm
Page 2. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer2.htm
Page 3. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer3.htm
Page 4. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer4.htm
Page 5. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer5.htm
Page 6. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer6.htm
Page 7. http://home.howstuffworks.com/dryer7.htm
(Page Seven Is All Links To Additional Help and Information)

Dryer Venting Page:
http://home.howstuffworks.com/framed...dryervent.html

Dryer Installation Information From The "How Stuff Works" Web Site:
http://home.howstuffworks.com/framed...e/irpdryer.htm

How Appliances Work:
http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-a...es-channel.htm

DIY Appliance Repair:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Thermador Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Jenn Air:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Cooking Ranges and Stoves:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Frigidaire Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...splay.php?f=65

Ranges and Hoods:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...ysprune=60&f=1

Bosch Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...sprune=60&f=67

Major Kitchen Appliances:
http://doityourself.com/radlinks/ad_...sprune=60&f=67
 
  #8  
Old 12-26-05, 07:03 PM
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Arrow Natural Gas Appliance Basic Installations Instructions

Below is a composite of basic appliances installation proccesses, steps, method and tips. Applies to almost all natural gas appliance installations.

If there isn't already a gas shut off valve installed on the natural gas supply pipe at the location where the stove and/or built in oven is to be installed, you will need to purchase a shut off valve. Usually one is present where another appliance was already installed but not always. Circumstances vary.

If there is an older style shut of valve already installed on the supply pipe, most likely you will need to replace it with a new one. The new one will match with the new connector. New connectors and old style shut off valves do not match.

If there isn't a shut off valve on the supply pipe, turn off the main gas and install a valve. The size for most free standing cooking stoves with ovens is 7/8ths. The flex connector must match the shut off valve. Which is usually but not always, 1" (one inch) pipe thread size on the female end. May be 3/4 inch in some cases. Buy the correct size to fit the existing needs.

All the required parts are available at the local hardware stores. This forum contains several questions on this subject of appliance connecting. Reading them will provide you with most, if not all, the additional information required.

Reminder. Gas has to be "OFF" to the supply line, if there isn't presently a gas shut off valve installed. Or the existing shut off valve has to be replaced.

In most cases, the existing shut off valve may not be the newer designed type. Which means the existing shut off (core valve) will have to be removed and a new design (ball valve) type installed.

The older shut off valves will not allow the newer type of flex connectors to screw onto them. Male thread ends different and the outside diameter is different sizes. So the existing shut off valve will than need to be removed first and the new style installed.

Which is when the main supply gas has to be turned off first. Once main gas supply is turned off, any existing gas in the line will not be of any major concern. Providing the main shut off valve at the meter totally shut off the gas. Some of the older types are known to allow a small amount to pass through....

Remove old style valve on supply pipe and install new type shut off valve. Use pipe thread compound on the threads or any type of oil. Avoid pipe tap unless you know how to use it properly. If you use pipe tape, once around the male threads on the supply pipe is enough. To much pipe tape creates problems.

The basic rule of thumb is to ONLY apply pipe tape to pipe joints and threads. Applying pipe thread compound {Dope} may also be used.

However, DO NOT apply pipe tape to the connector threads. Connector threads are those inside the female cap ends of the flex connector and or those on the adaptors. Doing so usually creates more problems of gas leaks that it was intended to solve. Especailly when too much is used and or the tape is rapped on the pipe threads in the wrong direction.

Flex connector threads either should be installed dry or apply a light oil to the threads only. Wiggle the connector, as you hand thread it onto the adaptor or shut-off valve, then only snug it up with a wrench.

Once that is completed, finger thread female nut of the flex connect onto the male end of the shut off valve. Finger threading is done to help prevent cross threading the threads.

Once cap nut firmly threaded onto male end of shut off valve, tighten cap nut with wrench to firmly secure it. Do not overtighten. Thread stripping or damage can occur.

New appliances will have an inlet gas pipe. Thread adapter that comes with flex connector onto pipe. Lube with thread compound, oil or one rap of pipe thread. Use same procedure as above and tighten firmly but do not overtighten. Just snug it up.

Once all the above is completed, turn gas on where ever you had to turn it off at. Turn on shut off valve to machine. Soap test for leaks. Use leak detection soap, if possible and available. Look for tiny bubbles at all connections made. No bubbles no leaks. Allow suffcient time for any bubbles to form. Be sure to soap well and all parts connected, and around all sides!

ADDITIONAL VIP INFORMATION:
Connector threads must fit together correctly. They connector nut on both ends of the connector should be hand threaded first, before using any wrenches. Use only oil to seal the threads. Do not use pipe tape or any other compounds on the threads of connectors, etc.

Leaks at most connections can be easily corrected. If not, the threads could be damaged or the parts are not compatible. Any doubts as to the condition of the parts used to connect the appliance should be replaced with new parts.

Best leak detection method is to use "Leak Detection Soap." Mix per instructions. Not having that, a soapy water solution made from commonly used dish soap will do fine. A slightly thick mixture to insure the soapy water remains on the parts and will still allow bubbles to form. A small cupful will do fine for the purpose.

Do not turn off the gas. Apply the soapy water solution using a sponge or common paint brush. Cover every connection location part and point. Especially connection locations you made and some locations which may have been unintentionally disrupted, etc. Then wait and watch.

Wherever a leak happens to be, regardless of how tiny, bubbles will form. Note every leak spots. Allow several minutes, if needed, for additional bubbles to appear.

Tiny leaks create tiny bubbles which may take time to develop. A second application may be required to locate some very tiny leaks.

Turn off the gas, at the gas valve on the supply pipe and make the needed repairs. Then retest the results. Repeat this process until all leaks are located and corrected.

Cautionary Reminder Note:
Before attempting any repairs, be sure to unplug the appliance from the wall receptacle power source first.

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  #9  
Old 01-01-06, 07:57 AM
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Kitchen Exhaust Vent Hoods

The fact is gas cooktops do not need an overhead exhaust venting system. Nor does an oven or stove with oven and broiler. Fumes are not the reason a hood is installed. The reason is the classification of the appliance.

Gas cooktop burners and appliances mentioned above are classified as non automatic and non remotely operated appliances.

Clarification and Classification:
Non automatic and Non remotely operated appliances.

Meaning any gas burning appliance that is Thermostically operated with the appliance located in another area, not visable, out of direct sight and one that turns on and off automatically. One has to be there physically present to turn the appliance on manually.

Even initially turning on any such an appliance as noted above (an appliance with or without a thermostat) is classified as non remotely operated and non automatically operated appliance.

A cooktop, stove with oven and/or built in oven and including a gas dryer are all classified as Non automatic and Non remotely operated appliances.

Since all the above are appliances where the operator has to be present for the appliance to operate and manually turn it on, the assumption is the operator will see, hear and be aware of any problems and/or conditions that are not normal operations or where any unsafe conditions may exist, etc.

The arguement or assumption is the burning of a fossil fuel produces products of combustion which are unfit and/or unsafe to breath is not true and there are no facts to prove otherwise. Providing the burners work well, the fuel burns cleanly and normally, the only byproducts of combustion is carbon dioxides and water vapors.

Only additional products of combustion is tract elements of sulfurs, carbon monoxides etc. in quantities much to small or low in volume to be of any health and/or risk hazards to anyone. Period.

So the arguements and/or assumptions an exhaust is required for any of the above mentioned reasons or any like and/or similar are not valid and/or do not apply. Best of my knowledge after all my years in the gas industry, no one has every died as a result of using a gas cooktop, for the purposes of cooking and/or when used as intended.

The exhaust hood is primarily there to provide direct overhead lighting, remove heat, cooking odors, moistures and for appearances. Some locals do require an exhaust hood but they are not needed and are not automactically operated.

Therefore, an exhaust hood not being an automatically operated unit, one can choose to turn it on or leave it off. If the hood was required because of any potential hazard due to burner exhausts fumes, the exhaust fan would turn on automatically, whenever a burner is turned on. This is not the case in non commerical establishment applications.

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  #10  
Old 01-12-06, 09:34 PM
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Question Oven Causing Carbon Monoxide?

Hello all, A couple of weeks ago my wife cleaned our propane gas oven with the self cleaning mode. Since then, every time the oven is used it has a strong odor, like something is burning, and it sets off the carbon monoxide detector.
Any ideas what that might be from? Maybe something is down below by the burners and needs to be cleaned out? If carbon monoxide is indeed being generated in large quantities what would need to be replaced?
Can't afford a new range, sure would like to just fix this one.
 
  #11  
Old 01-13-06, 06:43 AM
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Hello Kevin and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Gas Appliances topic.

I highly doubt cleaning (generically speaking) an oven will and/or could upset the flame characteristics enough to produce carbon monoxides.

Providing during the cleaning nothing was changed with the burner, it was not removed and replaced incorrectly. The inside plates and/or panels where reinstalled correctly, etc.

No aluminum foil is used to cover any interior part of the oven, including the racks. The vent opening inside the ovens baking compartment is not blocked and or restricted nor is the external vent or grill area. And the burner flames are all blue in color.

Chances are the remaining oven cleaners residue is burning off producing the odor and some invisable smoke particles which will set off a smoke alarm and/or a carbon monoxide detector. I have encounter this same type of incidents (oven cleaning setting off CO detectors) many many times.

Burning dust from heaters, and burning toast also can set them off. False alarms.... Happens here too on rare occassions....

Condition will not or should not continue once oven burns off the remaining residue of the cleaner. Providing all is correct in the oven as noted above. Inspect the interior and clean out any remain food particles, etc.

Use the reply button to add additional information or questions. Using the reply button keeps or moves the topic back up to the top of the list automatically.

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  #12  
Old 01-13-06, 12:39 PM
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Thanks for the reply Sharp.

Question regarding the use of aluminum foil. My wife did put a layer on the bottom, in the past she's just used an old cookie sheet, but she wanted more coverage. Is that burning and causing the problem?
 
  #13  
Old 01-14-06, 06:06 AM
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Hello: Kevin.

The foil is not burning. But chances are it is covering the holes and slots around the ends and edges of that bottom plate. Doing so restricts and/or blocks air flow needed to allow for complete combustion.

Therefore, with the foil usage and the vent holes/slots in the lower plate, the flames are sufficating do to a lack of oxygen. Air enterrs the bottom of the oven, supplies air to the burner and raises upwards with the heat. The foil prevents or restricts that natural flow. The gas than does not burn completely and/or fully. That's when Carbon Monoxide is produced, regardless of flame color.

DO NOT use foil. DO NOT use flame color as an indicator to determine complete combustion is taking place. Opening either door allows air into the oven. Which distorts the flames back into appearing as if the normal combustion is taking place, when it really is not. Using visual flame appearance and/or characteristics under different circumstances is best left to the professionals.

Remove ALL foil from anywhere it is in the oven and/or entire appliance. Allow the appliance to operate in the same condition it was designed to operate in by the manufacturer and prior to the present condition. Problem should than not result.

Problem was not present before the cleaning and/or usage of foil, thus it was caused by a change of some type after the cleaning. Usually foil is used and/or parts not reassembled correctly.

Logic often resolves more problems than it appears to.....
 
  #14  
Old 01-15-06, 05:11 PM
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I removed the foil and low and behold everything is back to normal. Thanks for the help. Saved me the cost of an oven which is what my wife wanted!
 
  #15  
Old 01-16-06, 06:23 AM
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Hello: Kevin

Glad I was able to provide you with the solution that resolved the condition. Happens often. Foil is used in an attempt to keep an ovens surfaces clean. Problem arises when that foil restricts normal air flow.

Foil also restricts the heats rising and changes internal baking compartments temperatures and air flow characteristics, even if the foil does not block and/or restrict air flow. Foil is both an insulator and heat reflector. Reflects heat as an insulator, to some amount. Thus, internal oven temperature will be effected.

Usually causing food items to be under baked on the bottom and over baked on the top of the item. Or to some uneven amount of heat based upon how much foil is used and where it is placed, etc. Always best NOT to use any foil anywhere inside any oven, gas or electric.

Thanks for posting back the results. And thanks for asking the question. Helps everyone else whom is reading this thread to learn more too....

I will use this thread by merging it into the sticky note.

Thanks, Regards and Good Luck.
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