propane gas pressure?


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Old 07-01-06, 03:54 PM
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propane gas pressure?

If anyone is knowlegeable about propane gas pressured appliances I could sure use some help. I have a cabin in the hills, right now I am running a 36 inch kitchen stove from a 100
lb propane tank. ( 5 burners) I also want to install a 40 gallon hot water tank to the propane. My question is........what kind of regulater will I need? or do I need one? I do not know if the stove has one built in or not but it is working perfectly. In the future I might even want to throw in a small propane fireplace. It's too far back into the mountains for a large propane tank set up. The cabin is only used 5 weeks out of the year. Thank you in advance.
 
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Old 07-02-06, 08:00 PM
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Hello hillbilly1955 and Welcome into my Gas Appliances topic.

The fuel tank already has it's own regulator. The stove most likely does too. Most likely but not always. Depends upon the year model and brand. May just have orifices drilled to comply to the pipe line pressure. Not as likely but possible.

You will need to investigate by looking for an appliance regulator on the stove. Should be located on the inlet gas pipe of the stove. Should be but may not be. May be installed on the house line pipe just behind the stove. May be there but not as likely.

If no regulator is found installed anywhere on the stove or one the gas supply pipe to the stove, may not be any. You will need to look for one. Than advise us here in a reply.

Water heater will use up the main propane tanks gas much faster. Meaning more frequent fuel deliveries. Buy the water heater already set up for propane fuel. In that manner no conversion needed....

Fireplace? More propane usage. Check with gas supplier how frequent deliveries are made in that remote location before installing too many gas appliances or opt for a larger propane tank.

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Old 07-03-06, 02:21 PM
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You should be more concerned with the volume of propane (BTU's) being utillized than pressue. Propane appliances regardless if it's a range, fire place, dryer, water heater or any combination of the above will require the same pressure (11 inches water column).

What you need is a regulator at you tank capable of flowing enough volume of propane that the appliances will consume.

Rough estimates will be 40,000 BTU's for you water heater, 70,000 BTU's for your range and 25,000 BTU's for a small fireplace.

In addition to the right size regulator at the tank, you will need a large enough diameter gas line to supply the appliances. I would not go with anything less than 1/2 inch inside diameter black iron pipe. Chances are if you are running just the range, you may have 3/8 inch (out side diameter) copper tubing. This will not provide enough volume to everything you are looking to run.

None of the appliances should require an external appliance regulator. Most domestic ranges have them internally. The only exception I've seen are the high end cooktops such as Viking and Dacor. I would double check the manufacturers paperwork to be sure.

If you're looking to buy the proper regulator yourself, I would look though a propane supplier or commercial supply house. I don't think any retail hardware stores or big box stores will carry what you need.

Lastly, I don't think one 100 lbs tank will last you five weeks with this kind of usage. It would be dependant of mainly water usage (amount of showers, etc.)
 
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Old 07-03-06, 03:23 PM
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Thank you for the replies. I finally found paperwork for the water heater which has a max. pressure of 14.0 WC and minimum pressure is 11.0 WC. Does this mean it has a regulator built in? The stove has a built in regulator and the outlet pressure is 10 WC and canot be adjusted. At present time there is 1/2" copper tubing supplying the stove. The water heater is not in service yet. Both are already setup for propane. I can't find any information for the BTU's on either appliance.I have to haul the propane back to the cabin. It's so far back in i even have to pump in the sunshine. LOL I have a coal/woodburning stove for heat so I guess I will just stay with that. If I understand right the most propane usage will be the hot water tank. We mainly use the stove for breakfast and the rest of the time we use a grill. If two adults are showering once a day, and pilot lights will be lit on both appliances........100 lb of propane won't last 5 weeks? Thanks again.
 
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Old 07-03-06, 08:17 PM
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Water heaters do not need an additional regulator. If the pressures say it's for between 10 and 14 inches w.c., it's telling me it's for propane gas.

You should be able to get away with the 1/2 copper tubing for supply since that's what you currently have. This is dependant on the distance between the tank and the appliances.

Regardless of specific regulators on appliances, you need one on the tank. This is a must! Do not try to tie the gas line into the tank with out one, the concequenses could be disasterous.

You largest propane consumption will be from you hot water heater. Most domestic 40 gallon water heaters will burn between 35,000 and 40,000 BTU's/hour. That equals less than 1/2 gal per hour. 1 gallon or propane equals 92,000 btus. I might add it will only burn that amount when it's physically burning (maintaining temperature).

For 2 adults showering once a day, plus dishes, laundry, etc. 100#'s (24.6 gallons) might make the five weeks. It will be cutting it close. I would consider (at a minimum) a second 100#'s.
 
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Old 07-04-06, 04:17 AM
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Thanks for the quick reply. Maybe I should have went with electric, but what is done is done. I bought the tank at a garage sale for $50.00. It was used for three months they switched to natural gas. Quite a deal since they go for over $300.00. Ok maybe a second 100 lb tank should be installed. Would I need a regualator on both or could I hook it up in a series? There is a gas supply company close to where I work so what would I ask for when I go there? Thanks again. It's great to have professionals answer my questions.
 
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Old 07-04-06, 11:12 AM
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You can hook the tanks together with one regulator. You would need a block tee on one tank, a pig tail from the tee to the second tank and the regulator with pigtail to the house line.

Hooked up in this configuration you will draw from both tanks at once for optimal performance.
 
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Old 07-05-06, 01:19 PM
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Thank you so much,
I'll give it a shot and let you know how I make out.
 
 

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