Gas Shut Off Valve


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Old 02-19-07, 08:51 AM
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Question Gas Shut Off Valve

I'm having a new kitchen gas range installed to replace an older one. This may require a shutoff valve to be installed within 4 feet of the new range gas connetion. Is a new shut off valve required or can a good 'previously used' one be used for this purpose?

The question arises because I understand that flexible gas lines can be used only once ( ie: not reusable) by reading the information on the packages of new flexible gas lines. And I wondered if previously used black gas line stubs, regulators, and shut off valves had the same limitation ( ie: not reusable after being connected once).

Thanks for any comments.
 
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Old 02-19-07, 12:13 PM
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Hello dale houser. Welcome to my Gas Appliances topic.

Gas stub, as you stated, applies to the iron or steel natural gas supply line. That is called a stub. If that is what you are referring to, the pipe does not need to be replaced and can be re-used forever unless the threads become damaged, etc. etc. etc. Not sure what you mean on this issue. (???)

A natural gas flex connector can be reused providing it is the new style. New style is the chrome coated type. Not the brass or bronze types or any like them. No longer are these types allowed in many areas of this country. Check with local codes and inquire at plumbing parts supply stores, non big box hardware stores, etc in your area.

Old style shut off valves also need to be replaced. They will not allow the connection of new style natural gas flex connectors to be connected.

Appliance regulators usually and most often come packaged with the appliance. Follow the instructions supplied to the letter. Remove any natural gas regulators installed in/or on a natural gas supply pipe.

If the appliance is propane (not mentioned which type of GAS will be used) contact the propane gas supplier for instructions. Never alter, change or install or remove any part at a natural gas meter or propane supply tank.

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Old 02-20-07, 03:23 AM
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GAs Shut Off Valve

Thank you for your comments. They are very helpful. Additional information is that this appliance is for natural gas.

I'm not sure exactly what an "old style" shut off valve is. The one I have ( my "previously used" one) has two female ends and a short threaded stub in each end. Each threaded stub is about one inch long and has an inside diameter of 9/16 inch and outside diameter of 13/16 inch. Looks like the threads are about 15 per inch. Can you tell from this information if this is an "old style " shut off valve? From what I've read in other posts on this site, I don't think it is, but I've come to wrong conclusions before.
 
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Old 02-20-07, 06:31 AM
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Hello: Dale

Based on the description you provided and how I am interpreting it, what you have is a dual sided female shut off valve with two male adapters installed into it. Used to connect two flex connectors together.

Two connectors together in order to double the length of one connector. Meaning the supply gas pipe may be to far away from the cooking stove/range. Two connectors connected in this manner can be done but it is not advisable. May not be code in your area either.

What is needed, if one stove/range connector can be used is a shut off valve that is installed directly onto the Nat gas gas supply pipe. Supply pipe diameter is usually one inch. On to it gets installed the shut off valve. Shut off valve will be a female pipe threaded end which goes onto the supply pipe.

The other end of the shut off valve will be a male threaded end. This end will have the tapered end (cone shaped) for the flex connector to be installed on. The other end of the flex connector gets installed onto an adapter which is installed onto the gas intake manifold of the cook stove/range.

The adapter that should come with the flex connector installation kit, or may have to be purchased separately, will be a double sided (male end on one side and female on the other side) installed onto the appliances gas inlet pipe.

Any local non big box hardware store will have the needed parts that comply to the new styles and types shut off vales and flex connectors used to connect new appliances.

If any newly purchased flex connector does not fit what is presently installed on the gas supply and/or shut off valve there, or parts you already have, etc. replace everything with new parts.

In this fashion it will not make any difference between old and new styles or types. Less work for both of us trying to describe parts and define them.... Plus, with all new parts installed correctly per instructions supplied with connector, the job will be correctly done.

Good Luck.
 
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Old 02-21-07, 06:06 AM
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GAs shut Off Valve

Hello and thanks again Sharp,

I'm off to the local hardware stores today to look over the parts you described for hooking up the new range. I may have to get a 90 degree elbow to attach to the gas line that comes out of the wall due to the short 3" clearance in the back of the range and run a gas line parallel to the wall about 24 inches reach the range gas inlet. Since the gas supply line coming out the wall already has a 90 degree elbow on it ( the supply line comes up through the wall and has an 1" elbow on it ) attaching another 90 degree elbow would result in the gas line having a U shape with the distance between two gas lines parallel to the wall of about 4 inches. I was wondering if there are code requirements that limit the diameter of gas line bends? My thought here is that the bends ( or sharp turns using 90 degree elbows) in the gas pipe probably cause more friction for the gas and result in lower gas pressure at the appliances, and if there are code requirements regarding them.
 
 

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