Gas range installation (DIY or professional?)


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Old 09-05-07, 11:24 PM
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Question Gas range installation (DIY or professional?)

My 60 yr. old house originally had a natural gas stove. At some point a previous owner capped the supply line for the stove and put in an electric stove. I'm going back to natural gas and want to make sure that I do things correctly - or call in a pro if need be. I also have a natural gas furnace and water heater.

If the DIY gods smiled upon me, all I'd need to do is shut off gas, remove cap, clean-up threads, apply pipe dope as appropriate and hook-up the new stove,
test for leaks, and revel in the glory of my work - but for some reason that seems too easy. So, here's the specifics:
(all parts seem to be original with the house)

1) The supply line that is capped is 1" outer diameter black steel pipe. The stove delivery people stated that the supply line needs to be 3/4" inner diameter. Can I assume that the supply line's inner diameter is 3/4"?

2) The shut-off valve for the supply line is 6' from the cap and is located in an easily accessible place in the basement (not the kitchen). Can I leave it where it is? Technically, aren't I just connecting a new stove to an existing line? Kinda like replacing an existing faucet or light fixture.

3) I don't know what accessories come with the stove other than a 60" flexible connector with 1/2" MIP x 1/2" MIP fittings.
(http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_02249694000P?vName=Appliances&keyword=49694&sLevel=0)

What pieces will I likely need between the supply line and the flexible connector?
And how do I determine if any of the fittings should be flared or not?

4) I (really my wife) don't want to be running to the hardware store looking for some odd sized part after the stove is delivered. If I need a new shut-off value or other pieces to attach the flexible connector, should I cap it until the store arrives?


I'm confident in my abilities once I know that I have the right parts and have an installation manual in hand. My biggest concern is finding new pieces that properly fit the old and getting as much setup before the stove is delivered.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 09-06-07, 04:47 AM
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Hello BHB_RHG and Welcome to the Gas Appliances topic.

First a compliment. Great job describing the scenero... Lost of details and specific info needed. Thanks.

#1
No. Inside pipe diameter is the diameter. Outside diameter slightly larger. Pipes are always measured using the inside diameter not the outside diameter. So the one inch pipe has an inside diameter of one inch, just as it is stated to be and referred to.

#1A to above.
No downsize in pipe diameter should be done. What needs to be installed on the end of the gas supply pipe, is a shut off valve that is one inch diameter on the female connection to pipe threads end with a seven eights (7/8ths) inch male end. Male end is where the flex connector gets connected to.

The above shut off valve is available at any local (non big box) hardware store. Same available for the flex connector. Large diameter shut offs and connectors are common for full sized free standing cooking stoves and ranges. These types of appliances have a surprising potential for a large gas volume demand.

Half inch is much to small a diameter for a supply, as would be a three quarter inch (3/4) supply pipe and connector. Both would work but not suggested nor recommended by appliance manufacturers. Read to installation instructions, if available.

#2
Yes. Leave the existing shut off valve, commonly referred to as a isolation valve, exactly where it is. Just turn it off prior to removing the cap and reconnecting the appliance.

#3
Use a NEW 60 inch length 7/8ths inch diameter range cooking stove natural gas flex connector and shut off valve (end of pipe shut off valve) as described above. No flaring of any thing or part required. All parts are pre-manufactured to fit together exactly.

#4
No need to cap any gas pipe should be needed if no gas odor detected. However, the end of the supply pipe should already have a cap on it's end, if I am reading your post correctly and that is what you're referring to in this paragraph. (???)

***If and or when you attempt any repairs, "Be sure the electrical power to the appliance is turned off, before attempting any repairs. Always check for gas leaks whenever the appliance is moved and/or a repair includes any connection of a gas part."

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Old 09-25-07, 07:06 PM
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Smile

Thanks for the advice. Everything went smoothly and we've been enjoying our gas stove for 2 weeks now.
 
 

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