KitchenAide gas stove creating carbon monoxide


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Old 02-07-08, 12:01 PM
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KitchenAide gas stove creating carbon monoxide

My KitchenAid gas stove, model YKGRT607HW9 is leaking carbon monoxide. This happens when the oven is just turned on and not even heated up yet and our carbon monoxide detector goes off which is situated across the kitchen on top of the fridge. The gas company stated that the carbon monoxide that was being produced was well over the standard amount that should be in any home and they can’t understand the problem b/c the pilot light was burning normal and even the flame in the oven and on the burners were burning normal (blue flame = normal). He suggested we would have to contact a gas fitter to come in and take a look at it and/or call the maker (KitchenAid) and have them look at it. However, all the gas fitters in my area state (over the phone even before they look at the problem) that they cannot help me b/c they don't deal with appliances and I would have to call an appliance service guy. When I contacted KitchenAid they got me in contact with my local “KitchenAid” appliance guy to set up a service call…however, they too said over the phone that they likely will not be able to help me and there’s no point in coming out that I would need a gas fitter??? I called another appliance fixer in my area and he said that even if he thought he could fix the problem (which he didn’t think he could since it’s burning normal) that he doesn't even have the tool/s to test and see if he fixed the problem and/or if it's still leaking carbon monoxide, he’s never had this situation before.

My home is not all that new (10 years old) and is not as air tight as what a newer home would be. My range is a 2004 model and this situation just started to happen 3 months ago (seems odd that it would start after approx. 4 years of use vs. when it was a new appliance and when my house was likely more air tight b/c it was only 6 years old then). I understand that possibly, perhaps in a in a newer home that would be more air tight, that happens to have a gas range that this could happen… however, why then, is this information not more “well known” by KitchenAid and the gas companies? I would hope that if this was a normal situation regarding air tight homes and gas ranges then they would offer this information as being “normal”. Yet, in my current situation, all involved have been inexperienced with the situation with no fix or solution just suggestions of possibilities of what could be the problem without even physically looking at the issue… the gas range.

Are there at all any gas fitters out there that can take apart a gas range stove, or an appliance guy who has their gas license? Since there are many gas ranges out there and they are not a new thing, should there not be a person who is licensed to repair them if there is a potential problem with the appliance leaking gas?

Please help, what could be causing this gas stove to be leaking carbon monoxide?
 

Last edited by Imbaffled; 02-07-08 at 01:08 PM.
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Old 02-08-08, 10:26 AM
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Hello Imbaffled and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and to the Gas Appliances topic.

This may sound strange but IMO and through years of experiences the condition you're experiencing is about normal/average. Save your time, money and all the aggravation, etc.

All ovens will emit high levels of CO when they first fire up and do so until fully warmed up. A co test is not done until an oven reaches 350 degrees and is on for at least 15 minutes after reaching 350 degrees.

Older more used ovens do it more often. Emit a higher level of carbon monoxides until warmed up also. Normal condition.

Ovens that are not spotlessly clean do it more often. Set off smoke detectors as well as carbon monoxide detectors.

Read the carbon monoxide detector instructions. Many instruction booklets will suggest not installing one in or near a kitchen. Many suggest installing the detector low.

In a wall electrical outlet close to the floor. Which is where co accumulates. Not up high on a wall. Same applies to battery units.

Your gas company service person should know all this. And how to lower the flame size, adjust burner air shutter, if need be, to lower a co level to within acceptable limits, etc. Amazing some do not have a clue yet they represent the gas supplier and are suppose to know this all...

My suggestion. Relocate the detector out of the kitchen totally. Rest easy too. You're not likely to experience nor have experienced any health problems.

There is far more co produced in a parking lot or near a busy street produced by car exhausts then you'll get or have been getting in your home until you bought a co detector.
 
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Old 02-08-08, 12:01 PM
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Thank you...

Thank you so much for your help and advice. This is the best information that I've learned so far. I agree my gas company should have known this stuff; however, perhaps my expectations were a bit high... since I just moved to a very remote northern area from a much bigger city where I found answers were more readily available.

I will also relocate my co detector... thank you again, you made my day, at least now I know it’s normal and I can save some $


Originally Posted by Sharp Advice
Hello Imbaffled and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and to the Gas Appliances topic.

This may sound strange but IMO and through years of experiences the condition you're experiencing is about normal/average. Save your time, money and all the aggravation, etc.

All ovens will emit high levels of CO when they first fire up and do so until fully warmed up. A co test is not done until an oven reaches 350 degrees and is on for at least 15 minutes after reaching 350 degrees.

Older more used ovens do it more often. Emit a higher level of carbon monoxides until warmed up also. Normal condition.

Ovens that are not spotlessly clean do it more often. Set off smoke detectors as well as carbon monoxide detectors.

Read the carbon monoxide detector instructions. Many instruction booklets will suggest not installing one in or near a kitchen. Many suggest installing the detector low.

In a wall electrical outlet close to the floor. Which is where co accumulates. Not up high on a wall. Same applies to battery units.

Your gas company service person should know all this. And how to lower the flame size, adjust burner air shutter, if need be, to lower a co level to within acceptable limits, etc. Amazing some do not have a clue yet they represent the gas supplier and are suppose to know this all...

My suggestion. Relocate the detector out of the kitchen totally. Rest easy too. You're not likely to experience nor have experienced any health problems.

There is far more co produced in a parking lot or near a busy street produced by car exhausts then you'll get or have been getting in your home until you bought a co detector.
 
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Old 11-03-08, 04:17 AM
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I'd like to re-open the topic of carbon monoxide from gas stoves.

Along with two space heaters, I've been using my gas stove to heat my apartment. I don't, however, do what most people do, which is to leave the oven door open. Rather, I leave it closed, and have found that it still raises the temperature of the apartment by several degrees. If the oven door is kept closed, it seems to me that it can't be any more harmful to me than cooking a turkey. I've been doing this from 3 to 6 hours a day, depending on how cold it is outside.

One of the reasons I do it is because I think my forced-water heating system is inefficient, and I'm trying to save money on gas. Unlike my heating system, which loses heat in the basement and on the floor below me, I can be sure that I'm getting all the heat when I turn the stove on.

Is it very dangerous to be doing what I'm doing?
 
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Old 11-03-08, 04:39 PM
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Hello Caleb Murdock. Welcome to the Gas Appliances topic.

What you're doing to heat the room or area by using the oven is allowing all of the unwanted products of combustion to enter the living space.

Most of these products of combustion are not harmful health wise. They are moisture and water vapors along with small amounts of other undesirable chemicals caused by combustion.

One major concern, IMO, is the moisture and water vapors created. Secondary, but still very important is the air consumption of breathable oxygen that is used to burn the gas.

All the above are based upon a well burning flame that isn't creating any unburned gasses, odors, soots or fumes, etc. All gas appliances create some carbon monoxides (CO).

Small amounts for short time spans will not cause harm. There is far more CO outdoors in streets and parking lots then you'll likely get using a properly operating oven for heating purposes, IMO. And based upon all the years of testing I have done in homes, etc.

HOWEVER! Cautions should and must be taken. Using any un vented appliance of any type for heating is and or can be dangerous to ones health and/or life. The chances taken are done so at your own possible peril and/or health risks........

The life you save just may be your own............

Use the reply button to add additional information or questions. Using the reply button keeps or moves the topic back up to the top of the list automatically and keeps all communications on this subject in this thread.

Regards and Good Luck. Web Site Host, Moderator Hiring Agent, Gas Appliances Topic Moderator, Multiple Forums Moderator & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.

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