Safe to extinguish pilot light?


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Old 07-04-08, 07:34 PM
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Safe to extinguish pilot light?

I would like to extinguish the pilot lights in my 20-yr old Magic Chef range (it came with my recently-purchased house) and just match-light it because the pilots really heat up the place. This was great over the winter but not now, in summer.

Is this safe? Do the pilots quit emitting gas when blown out in the same way a water-heater does?

Sorry if this is painfully obvious but I don't know anything about appliances and I didn't find the answer in Search or in perusing the site.

Thanks, -Bill
 

Last edited by 1crow; 07-04-08 at 07:39 PM. Reason: error
  #2  
Old 07-05-08, 06:51 AM
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Hello Bill. Welcome to the Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

Yes. The pilots to the top burners can be turned off. To accomplish this, look at the pilots cup. Where the flame is. Under neath that cup might be a set screw to turn off the flame.

Another location could be on the pilot gas tube (aluminum tubing) where it connects to the black gas supply manifold. The pilots are usually connected two to each tube.

A set screw will be located on the brass or bronze hex nut. Turning that set screw on the hex nut will turn off the gas to the pilots.

Use CAUTION: Those set screw slots can brake easily. Be sure the screw driver used is of the correct size and it fits the slot correctly. If one side of the slot breaks, you'll have to replace the hex nut or the entire pilot tubing for that side with the broken hex nut slot.

Pilot(s) in most ovens and/or broilers should not be turned off. Constantly burning pilots, in most types of ovens or oven/broilers heat a safety element. Which must remain heated or the burner(s) will not operate.

Oven/broiler burner pilot set screw turn offs can either be located under the thermostat knob/dial or on the gas control valve that supplies gas to the burner.

Under temp dial may have two set screws. LOOK closely at the markings before turning either screw. One set screw controls pilot gas and the other controls gas to the burner, on several types of controls. Depends upon brand, model and year of manufacture, etc.

"Be sure the electrical power and the gas supply to the appliance is turned off, before attempting any repairs. Always check for gas leaks whenever the appliance is moved and/or a repair includes any connection of a gas part."

Kindly use the reply button to post all replies, add additional information or ask additional questions when replies are posted. Using this method moves and/or keeps the topic back up to the top of the list of questions automatically and keeps all content on the same subject within one thread.

Web Site Host, Gas Appliances Topic Moderator & Multiple Forums Moderator. Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics and Repair Technician.
 
  #3  
Old 07-07-08, 07:22 AM
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Thanks so much Sharp. It worked. Sooner or later I will buy a new one.

btw, great site; this is a great resource.

-Bill
 

Last edited by 1crow; 07-07-08 at 07:25 AM. Reason: spelling error
 

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