Replacing Gas Regulator - Magic Chef Gas Range


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Old 03-21-09, 06:26 AM
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Replacing Gas Regulator - Magic Chef Gas Range

I have a Magic Chef 34MN-5TKVW-EV. It is about 15-17 years old. It was professionally installed and converted to LP when we moved four years ago. There was no previous gas installed so the rest of the installation was brand new. All the burners (stovetop and oven) recently started surging which suggested to me that the regulator is bad. I am mechanically inclined but have little experience working with gas.

The regulator is an Eaton Model:RR-23040 P/N:Y-63234-37. 1/2" inlet with two 3/8" outlets. Apparently the current replacement is Maytag P/N: 7510P059-60. I have found a couple of sources for this regulator.

The flex tube is four years old and appears to be in good condition. Is it reasonable to reuse it or must it be replaced?

It appears that the installer used teflon tape and pipe dope on the 1/2" tapered pipe thread connection, is this recommended practice?

The internal gas line appear to be 3/8" aluminum, with some type of compression fitting - not a flare, but what appears to be a swaged ridge that the compression nut presses against. I assume that this is to be assembled dry?

I realize I need pipe dope and/or teflon tape suitable for LP gas service, and plan to test all my connections with soapy water. Is there anything else I should know?
 
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Old 03-22-09, 08:19 AM
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Hello RobMcD and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and to the Gas Appliances topic.

Pulsing burner flames? Using propane gas as the fuel. I am not a propane gas tech but may offer some possibilities, since natural gas can cause the same type or similar conditions.

If the stove is the only appliance in the home, problem may be with the propane supply. Before any attempts are made to correct the condition, contact the propane supplier. May be their regulator.

Can also be excessively cold weather conditions (???) effecting the propane tank regulator or supply lines. Happens to natural gas regulators in extremely cold weather conditions as well as excessively hot weather conditions, which cause over pressurizations, etc.

if there are other propane appliances in the home and they are not effected, can be the appliances regulator. Likely a restricted vent. Not an easily accessible area. Nor an easy to clear opening. Often best to replace the entire regulator.

If you elect to replace the regulator and know for sure it is the appliances regulator, install the replacement per instructions. Be sure the arrow faces the appliances inlet.

I suggest you purchase the new regualtor at a locate appliance parts store too. Retail appliances parts stores can also help determine what the possible problem may be based upon that specific brand and model. Bring the make, model and serial numbers. Dealers and appliances parts stores are listed in the phone book.

Cautionary Reminder Note:
Before attempting any repairs, be sure to unplug the appliance from the wall receptacle power source first.

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Old 03-22-09, 12:48 PM
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I'll second what Sharp Advise stated. Contact your propane service provider. There is a good chance that the issue is isolated to their regulator. They'll be able to do a flow and lock up test of the gas regulator and determine if this is the case or it is an issue with the range.
 
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Old 04-24-09, 04:03 AM
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Here's the solution

A followup in case anybody else encounters this: I replaced the regulator in the stove - no change.

I got another two stage regulator to replace the one mounted on the side of the house next to the tank. When I disconnected the line into the house, something that appeared to be either very thick oil, or a light grease started dripping out of the line. it had a strong smell of both grease and mercaptan...

I use a 100# tank to supply this stove and fill it once a year. It must have been placed on it's side when being transported, so when it was connected some grease/oil was blown from the tank into the line. The tank was last filled about six months ago, so the link was not obvious. The problem occurred when the outdoor temperature hit the -25C to -30C range (-13F to -22F).

Amazingly this went through the outdoor regulator without any apparent damage. All we had to do was blow out the line with compressed air, reconnect and leak check everything. It has worked flawlessly for a few weeks now. As a bonus, the oven heats up faster - the grease must have restricted the gas flow.

Rob
 
 

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