turning off gas to stove and gas to dryer

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-13-09, 10:52 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Westchester County, NY
Posts: 211
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question turning off gas to stove and gas to dryer

I am having sears come install a stove and since I never experienced their installation service I had a question. Well, I tried to turn off the gas valve on the pipe by the stove but it is very old and it would not budge. Is sears going to be able to deal with that or are they going to break the valve and cause my home to explode?

Secondly, I am having home depot install an ELECTRIC dryer and hauling away my old dryer which is GAS. I couldn't find a valve on the gas pipe near the dryer, but I think I found a small one after the pipe splits from the furnace. Again, this was impossible to budge. So will home depot be able to get past this problem. Or how can I disconnect the dryer from the gas line before they arrive?


What should I do to make sure the installs go without any problems?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-13-09, 11:05 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,609
Received 205 Votes on 182 Posts
There is also should be a shutoff at the meter to turn off the gas to the whole house.

Do you have a circuit run for the new electric dryer. Their installation would likely only cover getting the old appliances out and the new ones in. Not adding/replacing gas valves or running new circuits for the dryer. If you want everything ready for them so the install goes smoothly you should pretty much have it so they can disconnect the old ones safely and slip the new ones in and make the final connections. If this requires changing the old valves the that is what I would do.
 
  #3  
Old 12-13-09, 11:38 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Are you sure you want to install an electric dryer. In many parts of the country it costs 2-3 times as much to dry your clothes with electric. Then there is the cost of installing a new 120/240v receptacle to run it if you don't already have one. Is there room in your breaker box for a 240v breaker. If not you may need to add tandem breakers if permitted in your panel or a subpanel. Just the cost of installing a receptacle if you don't have one may exceed the price difference between a gas dryer and an electric dryer. Not to mention possible extra cost to operate.
 
  #4  
Old 12-13-09, 03:00 PM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,007
Received 71 Votes on 64 Posts
Sears will not turn gas off to any but the appliance to be installed. If the valve won't turn you need to get a plumber or the gas co. to repair valves before installers come. Sears or HD will not turn frozen valves or replace them.
 
  #5  
Old 12-13-09, 05:05 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Westchester County, NY
Posts: 211
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
thank you all for your responses.

Here is the dryer:
DLE2101W Dryers Appliances
I have a 120 volt receptacle which I believe is 20 amps (i'll double check tomorrow). The website doesn't say the power requirements.

here is the washer:
WM2101HW Washers Appliances
It mentions 110v, 10 amps. But I would guess the dryer is more, 20 amps?

I wanted an electric dryer because I heard they are easier to fix. Also the dryer is energy efficient so what are the differences in cost?

Also, I believe I was able to turn off the gas to the dryer. I turned the thing on the pipe so that it is perpendicular to the flow of gas. However, how do I know if it worked? Start the dryer and see if it heats up? I was hesitant to do that because the dryer is really old and I don't know if it is in working condition.
 
  #6  
Old 12-13-09, 08:05 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
As I said the dryer will need a 120/240v (AKA 4 wire 240v) receptacle. Assuming there is room in your breaker box expect to pay some where between $100-200 if it is a very simple installation.
I wanted an electric dryer because I heard they are easier to fix.
Both electric and gas dryers are the same except the heat source. Gas heat does have a few more parts and may be a bit more work but the parts most likely to go out are the motors and control circuits and those far the most part are identical.
Also the dryer is energy efficient
That really doesn't' necessarily mean anything. So are almost all modern dryers. It can still cost an arm and a leg to use if the fuel is expensive. It just means it dosen't waste the fuel.
so what are the differences in cost
That will vary from place to place. You might call your gas company and ask. Where I live electric costs about 3 times more to use then gas.

Before buying the gas dryer I'd suggest you get bids from a couple of electricians for installing 240v/30a receptacle. Also check around to find the cost of gas vs electric in your area. The more loads you do per week the more important that will be.
 
  #7  
Old 12-14-09, 03:11 AM
pugsl's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 9,007
Received 71 Votes on 64 Posts
All good answers, Just to make sure you know you can not plug dryer into plug you have you need a new 220 circuit to dryer to work. Remember gas range needs a new valve at the back of stove.
 
  #8  
Old 12-14-09, 09:27 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Westchester County, NY
Posts: 211
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
okay, HomeDepot won't change the dryer to a gas, unless I cancel the order and reorder which would almost double the price of the dryer (i got it on black friday).

My concern right now is to close the gas line on the old dryer. So they can haul it away. I'll worry about hirign someone to connect it later.

I looked around and it doesn't look that hard.

1. Turn off gas
2. disconnect gas line from old dryer (could be tricky because this dryer doesn't have a flexible line, its the pipe straight into the back of the dryer)
3. Buy a special end connector for the size of the pipe and buy some liquid gas pipe thread.
4. Place thread on pipe
5. connect end piece and tighten
6. turn on gas
7. untighten end piece to allow air to escape then retighten
8. listen for whistle and then put soapy water on pipe to check for leaks.

Does that sound about right?
 
  #9  
Old 12-14-09, 10:52 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,609
Received 205 Votes on 182 Posts
Sounds about right except you don't have to do #7 and the cap you need is not that special it is just a black pipe cap. If you want you can put on a valve in case you ever want to back to gas.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: