Kenmore Gas Dryer Not Drying Well


  #1  
Old 11-24-00, 12:57 PM
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I have a Kenmore Gas (LPG) Heavy Duty Soft Dry Dryer that is about 7 years old. From day one it has not in my estimation dryed very well. It takes too long for clothes to dry. I gave-up on drying jeans or heavy cotton clothes. I do not load the dryer with a lot of clothes, but it seems to take over an hour or more to dry anything (well past what I would say is normal drying based upon past experience). There are no kinks in the ventilation line. We use Propane gas. Is there a thermostat problem? Can you increase the temperature output?
 
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Old 11-24-00, 02:05 PM
jeff1
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by MelissaC:
There are no kinks in the ventilation line.<HR>


Hi, trick to try...open window(s) in room where the dryer is...disconnect the vent from the dryer, pull the dryer out a foot or two from the wall...run one load through on a timed cycle of 45-50 minutes. If it drys better = venting/vent hood/lint filter/air flow problem. Do this only as a test!!...gas should not normally be vented indoors.

Thermostats, fan blower, gas burner coils, are just a few things that can effect drying times aswell in the dryer.

If you want to test heat...use a thermomater ( with no clothes inside the dryer ) on the exhaust air flow...on a normal heat setting should cycle approx 120-160F with the vent off...compair to with the vent on.

jeff. http://www.applianceaid.com/


 
  #3  
Old 11-24-00, 08:00 PM
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Hi:Melissa

The suggestions offered by Jeff1 are correct and well worth trying. If disconnecting the vent doesn't either correct nor help the problem you may have an undergassed burner.

An undergassed burner means the burner flame isn't the correct size. <The flame is too small> The dryer is rated at 22,000 BTU's and that's what it should be operating at. It may not be operating at that rate.

The burner BTU rate would have to be clocked <tested> by a technician. That's the only true way to know if the burner is operating correctly.

The gas valve, pressure regulator or orifice size, in the dryer could be the culprit, a restricted gas supply line to the dryer or a pressure supply problem in the house piping.

Good Luck,
TomBartco
Natural Gas Energy Technician and Consultant.

 
  #4  
Old 11-25-00, 06:47 PM
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Thank you Jeff and Tom for your advise. I want to try the thermometer test first. What type of thermometer should I use? Are there types that you can insert into the dryer without breaking while on??
 
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Old 11-25-00, 08:38 PM
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quote:<HR>Originally posted by MelissaC:
What type of thermometer should I use? Are there types that you can insert into the dryer without breaking while on??<HR>


Hi,

You will need a higher than normal temp thermometer..they can usually be purchased at most hardware stores. One that will do up to 200F should do.
Don't put it in side :-) as mentioned...hold it in the air comming out of the dryer exhaust vent at the back of the dryer.

jeff.
http://www.applianceaid.com/

 
 

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