GE Gas Stove JGB910


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Old 01-28-10, 08:49 AM
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GE Gas Stove JGB910

Read most posts re: HSI defects...my Broiler HSI glows, gas turns on and lights....my Oven HSI glows (brightly) but no gas flow and no burner lighting. My guess from reading posts is that the HSI doesn't reach proper temp to turn on gas. How do I determine whether this is the case and that I can eliminate a faulty gas valve as the culprit.????
 
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Old 01-28-10, 10:32 AM
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Hello PETERKSS and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and the Gas Appliances topic.

Very valid question. Also a difficult one to determine. Regarding which part (HSI or gas valve) may be the culprit.

However, what you may want to due as I often suggest, is to remove the broilers known good HSI and install it into the oven. Meaning replace the known good HSI into the location of the suspected inoperative HSI and/or suspected defective HSI.

Then turn on the oven and note what happens. If the gas valve opens and the burner lights, the removed HSI is defective. Replace it. Install the new HSI into the broiler to save time and effort removing the used HSI from the oven and reinstalling it back into the broiler.

If the broilers HSI does not resolve the problem of the oven burner not working, then replace BOTH the HSI and Gas Control Valve in the oven. Often this is done by service techs to insure operation and a satisfied customer.

Also helps to insure there is no free call back from customer for the same condition that was not resolved on the first call........

Try the above. Note the results and take the appropriate action to resolve the problem. Then post back the results...

Use the reply button to add additional information or questions. Using the reply button keeps or moves the topic back up to the top of the list automatically and keeps all communications on this subject in this thread.

Additionally Suggestion:
Retail parts dealers and appliances parts stores can also help determine what the possible problem may be based upon that specific brand and model. Bring the make, model and serial numbers. Dealers and appliances parts stores are listed in the phone book.

Additional Information, Helpful Advice and Instructions: HERE

Cautionary Reminder Note:
Before attempting any cleaning or repairs, be sure to unplug the appliance from the wall receptacle power source first.
 
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Old 01-29-10, 11:30 AM
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Thanks for the prompt reply....it's no fun to not have an appliance when someone needs it.

Your suggestion was the very first thing that came to mind. When I took the similar broiler HSI out to replace the oven HSI I discovered that they epoxied in place a different housing and bracket, making each HSI different. I then put everything together and in the process of retesting the ignition I discovered that shaking or tapping the gas valve made the gas flow. It thereafter had intermittent starting and stopping. Now the question becomes, Is the gas valve not receiving enough voltage to open the valve without help or is it just a sticking valve??

The valve is more expensive and I may indeed end up replacing everything out of frustration, but I would rather have an accurate diagnosis than throwing parts indiscriminately at the problem

Pete
 
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Old 01-30-10, 06:28 AM
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Hello: Pete

Tapping on the gas valve is a trick field service techs and reps use to open the gas valve when the igniter will not due it automatically. It usually indicates a weak hot surface igniter (HSI) condition.

The word above, Usually, indicates or means when the existing HSI has not already been replaced with a new one. Replacing the HSI with a new one almost always resolves the problem described.

Try replacing the existing HSI with an OEM HSI before assuming the gas valve is the cause. Chances are that will resolve the problem.

However, it may not or may not solve the problem for very long. Or it may. Often likely the gas valve will have to be replaced next time the HSI gets replaced.

Nothing us techs service is always a for sured first time solution for us techs either...... Which is why service reps/techs often replace both the HSI and the gas control valve on the first service call.....
 
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Old 01-30-10, 03:20 PM
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I haven'd had to dabble in gas stoves as much as gas dryers or gas water heaters, since days of working on prehistoric gas stoves in trailers years ago.

Do the newer gas stove gas valves sometimes have those same replaceable solenoid spools that the other mentioned newer appliances do, that might be faulty? Shouldn't he at least be getting gas if the sequence of the ignitor takes place, regardless of if the igntior is weak or not? I can't recall either if one can or should be able to discern or feel a click coming from that type of gas valve, if the gas valve has made the attempt to try to open? If no click? -bad solenoid spool? (if it has that).
 
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Old 01-30-10, 03:45 PM
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Sounds like a plan. Thanks for the advice......will follow up with resolution. Have a nice weekend Beer 4U2
Pete
 
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Old 01-30-10, 04:02 PM
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Sharp Advice is the big kahuna when it comes to this stuff. But since he was not around doing anymore give and take, I thought I'd offer my opinnion. You might see if your gas valve has those spools(usually 2, one next to each other) that have a couple spades with wires on them to each spool. I have replaced them on dryers and water heaters already.

You should also be able to ohms test that ignitor across it's 2 wires to see if you have an acceptible reading or something too high. The last gas range I worked on about 2 years ago, that was the problem. I found it through obsevation (crack) and ohms test.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 06:04 AM
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Arrow Oven and Broiler Gas Valves

The gas valves used in ovens/broilers differs dramatically from those used in dryers and often in forced warm air furnaces, etc. Dryers use two solenoids (coils) on a gas valve as a redundant safety backup system, which ensures the burner is turned off, should the flame become extinguished.

Also, so the dryers HSI can turn off while the burner remains lit. A dryer also has a flame sensor and another safety devices which ovens due not have.

Forced warm air furnaces are more like dryers then they are ovens/broilers. Both dryers and furnaces have several safety devices which are not used in ovens/broilers.

They primary purpose is both a dryer and a furnace and in some appliances like newer HSI ignited water heaters, are classified as remotely operated and automatically functional.

An oven is classified as a manually operated appliance. Which means only used when someone is there tending to it or someone is close by. And not remotely and totally out of sight etc. Therefore, such appliances due not need any redundant backup safety system and/or devices.

Summation: Oven gas valves do not have coils/solenoids. What is inside is a warp switch. when heated by electrical current flowing through the two metal stripes inside, one warps to come into contact with the other which completes the electrical circuit and the valves gas plunger/valve opens. Allowing gas to flow to the burner....

Hope all the above helps to explain why each appliance uses different types of gas valves.
 
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Old 01-31-10, 12:48 PM
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Sharp Advice,

Thanks for the info!

Hopefully we get to learn water Peter's problem turns out to be and how/if he was able to find the problem or just change a part.
 
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Old 02-04-10, 01:03 PM
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Smile

Thanks to Sharp Advice the problem is now solved in the most economic and sensible way. I went to a local (30 miles) Appliance parts place....showed him the two HSI's and their differing brackets...he reached behind his back,and immediately put the right replacement part on the counter. Turns out that the oven HSI bracket fits both broiler and oven but not the other way around. I took the part home,installed it (pretty quick after you do it once or twice)fired it up......PROBLEM SOLVED. Now I will go back to the Appliance Store and buy another HSI to back up the next failure.

Thanks for all the input.

Pete
 
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Old 02-16-10, 03:42 AM
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An oven is classified as a manually operated appliance. Which means only used when someone is there tending to it or someone is close by.
 
 

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