Special Grease for Gas range jets


  #1  
Old 12-20-00, 12:43 PM
Joe_F
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Hi Jeff,

One more time please, the name (or technical term) of that special grease that is used to condition and lubricate the gas valves on my mom's 1968 Vintage Magic Chef range?

I believe it's called stem and valve grease? I want to ask for the right stuff when I hit the hardware store. Will this help condition a valve that is difficult to turn?

Thanks again and happy holidays.

 
  #2  
Old 12-20-00, 06:02 PM
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Post Valve Core Grease

Hi: Joe_F

This is the gas appliance forum. Jeff is in the electric appliance forum. However, you have come to the correct place either way.

The grease you want is called valve core grease. It's designed to work in area's of high temperature. Johnson Controls makes the grease and I am sure others do also.

This high temperature grease is often used on commerical ovens. Since stove top burner valves on residential stoves are not exposed to the high temperatures of commerical equipment, any light weight grease will do fine.

The commerical grease, if you still want it, you'll have to buy at the appliance retail parts store. However, cost wise and the small amount needed for one stove, may not be cost effective.

Any light weight oil will do just as well. Our field reps. use it currently and have been for years. Fact is: they don't even remove the valve nor disassembly the valve to oil it.

Close the main gas valve behind the stove. Remove the burner from the orifice, put 5 or 6 drops of oil in a piece of unused automobile fuel hose. Apply one end over the orifice and the other end into your mouth.

With a bent nose pliers, gentily pull up on the valve stem to unseat the valve core, then gently blow the oil into the core while turning the valve. Once the oil enters the core, lower the core back in place, remove the hose.

PRESTO! An oiled valve that now turns like new.

After doing all the valves that needed this done, replace the burners, turn on the gas, relight any and all pilots.
Turn on the burners that were oiled and let the excess oil, if any, burn away.
 
  #3  
Old 12-20-00, 06:18 PM
Joe_F
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Thanks Tom.

I could be wrong, but I do not think these valves have this type of orifice. They have a nut on top of the shaft much the same way a compression style water valve does. This one that is hard to turn is only 5 years old, I replaced it in 1995. One or two of the others has been repacked and renewed by the appliance shop.

I'll check out my appliance place, Home Depot and my local hardware store. If you're referring to light oil as say "3 in 1" oil, I've got plenty of that. If I let it soak down the shaft area, would that work out?

Thanks again.

 
  #4  
Old 12-22-00, 02:39 PM
Joe_F
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Wohoo. Thanks Tom. Works like new now. I took a little 3 and 1 oil and eased some down the shafts of all the valves.

I cleaned the unit while I had it apart and turned on the jets, much easier to turn. I will now periodically lubricate them again every once and a while.

Thanks again. Happy holidays.
 
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Old 12-22-00, 06:08 PM
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Hi:Joe_F

Glad you had success oiling the top burner valves through the valve stems. Often times that method doesn't work well.

You did actually locate the orifices. Every stove has them and they are all located on the manifold. They are screwed onto threaded shafts that extend out from the manifold pipe. Orifices are those brass thimble like caps with wrench ends. They are all standard in size and any thin walled 7/16 open ended wrench will fit them.

Once you removed the burner, the orifice is that cap that supports the tube end of the burner. This is the place to push one end of the hose onto. Then extend the hose vertical, add a few drops of light oil and blow into the other end of the hose to force the oil into the valve core while pulling up GENTLY on the stem and turning it.

Although you had success oiling through the stem, this isn't the correct way nor will it last. Fact is: it may cause some problems later. Keep an eye on those valves and smell for gas leaks which may or may not develope later.

Much of the information contained in this posting is for anyone else whom may attempt to oil a stoves top burner gas valves, as you have. They may not have the luck you did. I suggest they follow the correct method or have a professional do this for them using oil or valve grease.

The advantage of oil is ANY stove top valve can be lubed this way. However, not ALL valves will disassemble or resassemble. Any valve that clicks to adjust the burner flame or has preset settings that click into a position is called a 3 or 4 speed valve. These types should NEVER be disassembled. Often times even the very best stove tech will wish he/she hadn't taken one apart...LOL

Once again, glad the results you got worked.
Also, thanks for your repost of success using a variation of my instructions...:-)
 
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Old 12-22-00, 06:21 PM
Joe_F
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Lightbulb

Tom,

Will of course keep my senses out for any problems.

You make a good point. Originally, this old Magic Chef had on-off burners. However, Magic Chef/Macor has superseded the burners to the simmer type burners. Makes you wonder what the actual difference was for this base model stove versus the simmer type ones from the factory. I suspect only in the valves.

In '95, when I had some trouble, I had the gas company come. At that time, it was a regulated gas company (Brooklyn Union Gas here in NYC). The tech came and explained to me what the problem was. The valves were basically leaking from age.

I brought the units into my local parts house and they rebuilt some of the originals (again, the originals are were all on-off units), but I had subsequent problems with one and had to order a new one. When I got the part from the supplier, they were the simmer type (with the clicks you describe). I still have the bag with the part # on it stapled to the instruction booklet.

If they give subsequent problems in the future, I will probably just replace all of the offending valves with new ones, which will likely be of the simmer type, since this is what I understand they use to service these now. It seems the appliance shop where I get my parts had some trouble with some of them, as I had to order that new one in 1995. As I recall, it was about 40 bucks for the new valve. Figure 150 bucks and about 15 minutes of my time is a lot better than a service call. The valves were very easy to change, took me about five minutes.

Once again, the offending valve is the 1995 issue simmer type. So, from your post I did the only thing possible as I would not have had success in lubing it the way you prescribed? Maybe I caught it before it got very bad perhaps.
 
  #7  
Old 01-04-01, 01:37 PM
Joe_F
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Tom, I just reread my post and your reply.

Let me clarify:

I never took anything apart. I just put a little oil on the shaft area and let it work its way down into the valve. Nothing more. How does this cause/intoduce a gas leak? Curious.

I would fear that disassembling the valve would cause trouble (even the appliance guy had some problems when they were rebuilt).

I have the folks at Gem Products checking this and the wall oven hinges out and hopefully I'll have a reply soon.

Thanks again and will keep an eye on everything.
 
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Old 01-04-01, 03:15 PM
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Hi:Joe_F

I know how you oiled those valves. You let oil drain down the stem. I mentioned another method using a hose and the pressure of your breath. You didn't use this method but somehow got lucky and it worked. So be it.

I am also aware you didn't want to take the valves apart nor did I suggest or reccommend you attempt it. I never advise anyone to attempt it and I'm aware that even the best of the stove repair service persons have difficulties oiling or greasing top burner valves.

Topic closed.

In referrence to the oil causing problems later on, oil traps dirt and debris which may accelerate valve stem and core wear under the hold down bracket. The oil is only suppose to be inside the valve on the core. However, not to worry. All my be okay.

Topic closed.

Regards,
Tom
 
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Old 01-04-01, 04:05 PM
Joe_F
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Thanks for the input Tom. Will keep an eye out.

The next time there is any trouble, I will likely R&R (remove and replace with new) those valves. I've got Gem looking into equivalents for them.

My local appliance parts depot charged me 36.00 each back in 1995/96 when I got the one replacement.

Once again, thanks for the insight.

 
  #10  
Old 01-04-01, 10:21 PM
jeff1
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Cool

**I WAS TOLD BY AN OLD TECH THAT THE GREASE THAT THEY USE IN HOT WATER FAUCETS I USE HIGH TEMP GREASE. YOU CAN BUY IT IN THE PLUMING SUPPLY STORE. I USE IT ALL THE TIME IN BBQ CONTROL VALVES**

**can't go wrong with silicone grease. It is available at most industrial supply places. I use dow corning 111 valve lubricant and sealant. I think dow makes a whole line of silcone lubricants.**

Hi Joe, Hi Tom,

These where from other postings....glad you got them working!!...how did you make out with the hinges??

jeff.

http://www.applianceaid.com/


 
  #11  
Old 01-05-01, 05:29 AM
Joe_F
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Hi Jeff and happy new year.


I have Gem Products (www.gemproducts.com) checking on the hinges. I also asked them to see if they have these valves available (either the old on-off type or the simmer "4 speed" style valves) so if I need them in the future, I have the part numbers handy.

In the past they were also kind enough to fax me the parts breakdown for my oldies so I could easily locate the part numbers in question.

They are supposed to be faxing me a drawing of the hinge.

I'd rather not go to Maycor if I don't have to. However, I have not tried my appliance parts depot. I'm sure he can come up with something.

Jeff: I saw the lubricant you were talking about in the hardware store (High Temp. Valve and Stem grease). I didn't buy it because it did not specifically list valves for natural gas, but did for water. Didn't want to risk it.

I'll keep you posted. The stove is working great now. I have to get into those hinges probably in the spring. I'm collecting the info. now though.

If you guys ever have a car problem, pop on the automotive forum where I post help and replies very frequently. Or, e mail me directly if you want. Hopefully I can return the favor one day.

Thanks and best regards,
 
 

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