Gas stove valve repair

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Old 01-11-11, 02:42 PM
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Gas stove valve repair

Hello,

I have a GE JGP389 gas stove, circa 1998, needing some TLC. Four burners.

I have determined that one of our valves (p/n WB21X5322) has a small leak, seems to be from around what looks like a flow adjustment screw (appears to adjust gas flow for low-medium setting) in the top of the valve core. This adjustment screw turns freely on the valve core in question, but the same screw on the other three valves do not appear to turn. I'm not sure if this is due to age and the others are simply stuck, or if they are intentionally sealed into position. Does anyone know whether that screw should be sealed into place or able to turn?

If that screw should be sealed, is this something I can fix with a sealant or must I now buy a new $150+ valve because of that screw?

thanks!
Henry
 
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Old 01-12-11, 06:56 AM
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Hello Henry. Welcome to the Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

I'm not really sure what your stove has as far as top burner valves. The description you're posting is to vague and mixed in with summations and personal opinions, etc.

Not to offend you surely but more to inform you and request exactly what the condition is, exactly where a leak may be, etc. Would be best to positively determine exactly where a leak is.

Suggestion would be to apply leak detection soap first to the tip end of the orifice. Note if any bubble or bubbles appear after waiting a brief time span. If the inner core valve leaks, bubbles will appear on the orifices tip end where the hole is.

In such a case, my suggestion to you would be to replace the entire valve. Which, by the way, should not cost $150.00!... Not even close...... to that amount far as I remember when working in the industry not so long ago.

If not leak at the orifice, then soap the top of the valve and wait some time for bubbles to appear. If none appear, not the location of any leak either. If bubbles due appear from either location, best possible solution is to replace the valve with a new OEM part. At least as a do it yourself repair replace entire valve. Not how I would due it as a repair tech but how you should should as a DIY repair.

If there is no indication of any leaks at either location, then a leak exists in another location. Replacing the valve would then not solve the problem regardless of that single loose screw or what seems to be a loose screw on that specific valve.

Use the leak soap and reply back with your findings and any addition positive and exact findings. Leak test soap available at all or some appliance parts store locally near by your location. Refer to phone book.

>Retail appliance parts dealers can also help determine what the possible problem may be also. They will need the make, model an serial numbers. Appliance parts dealers are an excellent source for original replacement parts. Dealers are listed in the phone book under appliances.<

Kindly use the reply button to post all replies, add additional information or ask additional questions when replies are posted. Using this method moves and/or keeps the topic back up to the top of the list of questions automatically and keeps all content on the same subject within one thread.

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Old 01-13-11, 01:58 PM
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Thanks very much for the follow-up. Here is a link to the valve assembly in question, just so you can visualize (Appliance Zone - Product: Stove / Oven / Range Right Burner Valve - WB21X5322). This was the best price I could find online, but still $100+ship seems a bit steep. If you know of a more economical source I'd much appreciate it.

I did earlier go through the process of soaping the area and looking for bubbles, but there are so many crevasses in this part it was hard to make sure I had good soap coverage and I was not able to get it to produce any bubbling. So as a plan B, I put a balloon over the valve stem and stretched it over the square housing, which produced a good seal. If I let it sit there for about 10mins the balloon would lightly fill enough to make the balloon stand (but not enough pressure to make it stretch the rubber and inflate). I did this over the other valves too and saw no sign of inflation so fairly certain I had localized to to the valve.

The valve part I suspect is leaking is not visible in the assembly picture I linked above. Imagine teardown, the stem turns against a washer-like plate that compresses a spring into the valve core. The core appears to be stainless steel and is shaped like an upside-down cone (sitting in a cone-shaped bore) with various holes around it to control the gas flow as it is turned. In the top of the core (the base of the cone) there is a brass screw-top (flathead) that appears to control gas flow to one of the holes in the cone. This screw-top turns freely (whereas the same screw in the other valves do not) so it is the only area in the valve I can imagine is the source of the leak, but that's the bit that's hard to prove.

If someone could tell me if that screw-top adjustment should be sealed (perhaps adjusted at the factory and glued in place somehow) then it would help confirm that the leak is coming around that screw-top; otherwise, I'm not sure where else in the valve would be leaking. The valve core seats smoothly in its bore and no signs of separation. The valve cores definitely do need lubrication, but all of them do, so if its possible for lack of lubrication to produce leaks between the valve core and bore then I would expect at least one of the other valves to be leaking too.

So do you know if the screw-top adjustment I refer to should be sealed or turn freely?

thanks for your help,
Henry
 
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Old 01-14-11, 04:40 AM
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Hello: Henry

Seeing is believing.... And part pricing has really gone up......since I was a field service tech....

That valve cannot be repaired and no attempts to do so should even be considered. A more complex valve then a standard core valve. Center set screw used to set flame setting and should not be loose. Valve worn out and must be replaced with a new OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturers) part.

However, there have been some instances where the standard non adjustable valve can be used in place of the one already there. But not a do it yourself repair I would suggest UNLESS a local parts dealers has such a replacement part intended exclusively for the conversion. Not likely but one may exist.

IMO, you should Inquire at a local retail parts dealer in your area. Not from an on line parts site.
 
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Old 01-14-11, 08:08 AM
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Unfortunately, range valves in recent decades usually have a bunch of tiny little parts. You are getting correct and Sharp advice against trying to rebuild it, in my opinion.

Never heard of the balloon method for identifying gas leaks before!

To soap out fitting use a 1:1 solution of dish-washing detergent and water. Use a paint brush or spray bottle to saturate the area being tested, and wait 3-5 minutes while looking for very tiny bubbles.

The fact that the balloon method worked suggests a fair amount of gas from the leak, which usually makes it MORE difficult to get the leak to bubble.
 
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Old 01-14-11, 09:02 AM
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Thanks for all of the advice. Consensus is to bite the bullet and replace the valve, hopefully find a better price. I do have a few more questions...

1. For starters, just to help reconcile this frustration, about that center set screw (in the valve core) used to adjust flame that before was fixed in position but now turns freely -- is that something that would have been factory set and sealed into place? Is it logical that it now turning freely would be the source of the leak?

2. I can't tell from the valve part picture, but I've read elsewhere that these are threaded to screw into the manifold, so a reasonable DIY?

3. I've read about using a colored teflon tape to use for gas threads, but also a thread compound that comes in a stick? recommendations?

4. On lubricating valves, I've read about the ideal "valve core grease" but also that general household oil will work just as well?

thanks again for all the sage advice,
Henry
 
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Old 01-15-11, 06:13 AM
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Hello; Henry

I do not like nor often use quotes in my replies. However, in this instance it may be a good idea to do so.

1.
...is that something that would have been factory set and sealed into place?
Answer: YES. Most, if not all, are now pre-set and sealed.

Is it logical that it now turning freely would be the source of the leak?
Answer: YES. Also may indicate it was sealed at one time and then the seal was broken for some reason.....

2.
I can't tell from the valve part picture, but I've read elsewhere that these are threaded to screw into the manifold, so a reasonable DIY?
Some valves do screw into the manifolds. Others do not. They clip onto the manifolds. If the gas supply manifold pipe is round it will use a threaded valve. If manifold is square and flat it will use a clipped on valve with an "O" ring acting as a seal. These are just slightly more difficult to DIY replace.

3.
I've read about using a colored teflon tape to use for gas threads, but also a thread compound that comes in a stick? recommendations?
Personally, I do not suggest nor recommend using tape to a DIY'er. Often to much is used which is worse then none at all. Best to use thread compound or just plain "OIL." 3 in 1 or some type like it.

4.
On lubricating valves, I've read about the ideal "valve core grease" but also that general household oil will work just as well?
As a tech I've used both. Oiling works well if done correctly with the right tools and methods. Valve Core grease works best. But not on 2-3 stage valves when done by a professional. And no pros I know of oil or grease multiple stage gas valves. Simply to difficult to R&R.

On simple rotary valves, grease works best. But not to much!...:NO NO NO: A little grease goes a long way........

About all the advice, suggestions, recommendations, etc info I can offer you on this project. Good Luck....
 
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