Using premade burners on the fire pit

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Old 05-10-11, 12:23 PM
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Using premade burners on the fire pit

Tried another forum, no answer, so hoping someone here will be able to help.

I have already built a fire pit with 1/2" fireplace valve on it. It's seven feet long and 18" wide. The guy who was suppose to make a burner for me has disappeared so I need to improvise now.
I have been told that I can use a universal H burner(s) from Home Depot and don't worry about the custom burners.
Char-Broil Universal Replacement H-Burner - 2386254P at The Home Depot
These don't have a thread at the end of the flex pipe that attaches to the burner, I have a hard time imagining how to convert these to a threaded connection (Assuming that is preferred type for my application) between supply line and the burner.
Following are the stainless burners available specifically for the fire pits on ebay.
12 Inch Stainless Steel H Fire Pit / Fireplace Burner | eBay
I assume these are better option because they are already threaded and I could connect 3 or 4 of them in parallel for better gas distribution throughout my firepit.
Can someone please advise me on which option is viable and should I turn the burner holes upside-down or rite-side up. I've been told that facing them down prevents ( to a certain degree) plugging in the holes with lava rock dust.
Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 05-11-11, 06:49 AM
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Hello Newbie

Based on how and what I am reading in your post, you would have to install a gas supply pipe and then connect each burner to it with it's own shut off valve. Each valve for each burner will allow you to use each burner seperately, if that's what you want. Or use only one shut off valve for all burners.

Try asking at local retail outdoor patio BBQ supply stores for additional ideas and/or suggestions. Welding shops can also build you a customized burner if that's what is needed and/or wanted. About all I can suggest for you. Check back. May be additional posts with more ideas and suggestions.
 
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Old 05-11-11, 07:54 AM
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thanks

Thanks for your reply Sharp!

That actually how I started my search, going to local shops, unfortunately they all suggesting custom made burners. Since I am building my own fire pit, not many of shops are willing to just come in and install the burner and the only one that agreed to do it, has a tendency to disappear. When I called a local welding shop, the guy there, actually suggested going with the Home Depot route because he said custom making the burner will be BIG money compare to pre-made burners purchased from HD.
My goal is to try connecting all separate burners to one or two main rails that would feed from one valve.
 
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Old 06-01-11, 11:02 AM
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I got my burners (damaged - but that's another story) and ready to install them. I am wondering what should I use as a sealant on my pipe threads inside the fire pit.
I know not to use anything on the compression type fittings, but the pipe threads need something.
Your opinions please.
& as always - THANKS!
 
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Old 06-01-11, 07:48 PM
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Forgot to ask one more question.
I have 12" flexible lines to connect my burners. Because I am not laying them directly on the floor of my fire pit, I can theoretically install the burners without those lines. Is there a befeit of using or not using the flex lines?
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-04-11, 02:50 PM
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Personally I recommend AGAINST home brew equipment, especially home brew outdoor equipment.

I've seen some of it, and it usually isn't adequately designed in various respects, and can be unsafe. That's especially true for outdoor equipment and fire pits --- the ones I've seen usually do a poor job of managing the demands of water and weather.

There are some commercially made outdoor firepits available. I'd buy one of those.
 
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Old 06-10-11, 07:15 AM
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Thanks,

That was my initial idea, to get one of those portable round thingys, but I ended up building a concrete enclosure for the fire pit, so there's no going back now. I was just wondering, what makes those premade fire pits better and if I can replicate their success.
Thanks,
 
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Old 06-16-11, 05:41 PM
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What makes the manufactured fire pits better is much better design and conformity to engineering standards of rating agencies.

Few people are going to understand the wide variety of stresses outdoor equipment in particular is exposed to ---- corrosion, insects, flooding and so on. It's a very harsh environment.

I wouldn't begin to assemble such a system myself, and I have a good deal of knowledge and experience with outdoor systems.


Frankly, my suggestion would be to start over. Any DIY project should BEGIN with the assumption that you will have to do things over a time or two before you get it right.
 
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