Venting requirements for gas dryer


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Old 01-10-01, 07:17 PM
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Question

I would like to replace my current electric {no pun intended}dryer with a natural gas model. The electric dryer is vented horizontally outside thru the wall.
Questions:
Can this same vent be used for a gas dryer?

The gas hot water heater and vent stack {which passes through the roof}is located 10 feet away. If the dryer has to be vented vertically, can the dryer vent be tied into the existing heater stack or do I have to cut another hole in the roof?

Would a gas stove require a hood vented to the outside?

Thank you in advance for your comments.
 
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Old 01-10-01, 08:12 PM
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Hi:Housemarried

A dryer should avoid being vented vertically. The fan doesn't have the needed power to push the air up to the roof, in most cases. Vertical venting should be avoided.

You should never tie into any other vent when one appliance has a fan or forced vent fan. Doing so will cause fumes to back up <spill> out of the downdraft divertor.

Tieing into any existing vent to add another appliance to the vent will overload the existing vent and cause fumes to backup also. Doing this is not code and can be hazardous.

The vents used when two or more appliances are sharing a common vent to the outside are always larger to handle the extra load.

A dryer must have it's own venting and horizontally is the best and safest method. Therefore, I do not suggest you cut any holes in the roof. Vent it outside thru the existing electric dryers vent.

There isn't any area in this country that I am aware of where code requires a hood vent be installed over a stove. You can contact your local city building and safety department for further information.
 
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Old 01-10-01, 08:23 PM
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Dryer vent requirements

Thank you for your prompt response! It is a relief to hear I can use the existing vent.

If you don't mind, I have a few more questions:
The current vent pipe is a flexible plastic hose attached to a plastic wall vent with louvers {sp} Should I change these to flexible metal?

Of course the current electric dryer is 220 volts. Do gas dryers operate on 220 volts or 110 volts? If they are 110 volts can I just disconnect and tape off one of the hot leads and change out the circuit breaker at the panel?
 
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Old 01-10-01, 08:46 PM
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Hi:Ray Kane

There isn't any need to change to a metal exhaust vent pipe. Anyone telling you differently is either misinformed or selling you something you don't need.

Gas dryers run fine on the plastic venting tubes. Since you changing the dryer, I would suggest you go the extra few bucks and replace the flex plastic vent tubing and the vent too. Plastic or metal vent is okay as well.

In regards to the electrical, You may beable to do that part yourself as well. However, I am not an expert in that area nor would I feel comfortable telling you how to. You can post the electrical part of the question in the electrical forum and I am sure the pros there can help you.

What I can tell you is there isn't any 220 volt gas dryers I am aware of made. All gas dryers run on standard 120 volt house current.

Good Luck,
TomBartco
 
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Old 01-10-01, 08:52 PM
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Gratitude

Thanks again Tom and thanks to all who have taken the time to respond to the questions. This website has been a time and money saver!
 
  #6  
Old 01-11-01, 07:09 AM
camachinist
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Lightbulb

Dryer...concur with Tom
Additionally, if you use the flex plastic vent tubing (I have the same setup on my LPG dryer), I would recommend occasionally disconnecting the vent tube and cleaning it out....lint can get by the lint screen in the dryer or the lint screen can fail and the vent can become blocked, especially if you have any sharp bends (like I do).

My mom has an electric dryer with the same setup and it's worked (with 3 different dryers) just fine over the last 50 years...

BTW...if you have a washer located nearby, there should be a 120V duplex outlet sited for it (that's how it is at our house and my moms)... I have my dryer plugged into the other recepticle and it works fine....the 220 outlet is sitting there empty (Yes, gas dryers are always 110V unless special ordered or European)

Gas stove...
Although codes may vary around the country, in our area (Central California), I've seen many homes with gas (and electric) stoves and cooktops which aren't vented to the outside. Some are unvented, like my mom's or have recirculating filtered hoods (which in my opinion are useless). I have a vented hood (the house came with it 32 years ago) and upgraded it from the essentially impotent unit it was to a new design, more efficient unit when installing my new gas cooktop a couple of weeks ago...

All I can say in favor of vent hoods (regardless of code) is that they keep the kitchen a whole lot cleaner and the house a whole lot less stinky from cooking odors (we love sauteed onions)...and, in our case, vent the combusition byproducts of our big cooktop out of the kitchen so we don't load up on CO if something isn't working right with the cooktop...

My wife loves gas appliances but it does occur to me that, with natural gas prices skyrocketing, that cost of use would become a consideration. We're on LP so we've been used to somewhat higher prices for energy but I just fill up the big tank once a year, pay the piper, and don't really notice the usage the rest of the time...

Good luck with your projects...

Pat
 
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Old 01-11-01, 05:35 PM
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Stove vent continued

Thanks camachinist,

I agree with you regarding the stove recirculating hoods. I think the purpose of these units is to direct the exhaust back into your face!

The stove is located on a preimeter wall. Could I run the exhaust vent tube up from the hood into the attic and then down through a soffit vent?

Regards,
 
  #8  
Old 01-11-01, 07:36 PM
camachinist
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Cool Stove Venting

The preferred method (check your local code for details) is to vent vertically with metal vent tubing (mine is 7" round; there is also a 3 1/4 x 10") with a minimum of bends, preferably with at least a 24" run between them...

I have only seen installations with soffit venting or sidewall venting where the blower unit is remotely mounted, eg. in the attic, near the vent outlet..

You're talking restaurant quality hardware that's way out of the depth of my wallet *G*

It's really not difficult to invade the roof to install a vent unless you've got clay tile or slate or something similar. Many of the DIY shows on TV have had episodes covering how to do it...ever watch HGTV?

You might pose the venting question in one of the other forums here.....

Pat
 
 

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