LPgas camping stove playing flamethrower

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Old 12-17-11, 02:45 PM
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LPgas camping stove playing flamethrower

I have a basic cheap LP gas camping stove (designed only for LP gas and not made to be converted to use on other fuels). it is a gasmate 2 burner stove as seen on gasmate.com.au . It ran fine when I first got it, and as time has gone on, it just gets worse. By worse I mean it used to light fine and act normal, but now it will light and throw flames then drop right down and maybe nearly go out, and then flare up again and throw flames and change its flame height up and down between flame thrower and completely dead, all with the knobs being untouched and all very quickly and randomly. After a while the flame only has a minor rise and fall and then within 3 or 4 minutes its acting completely normal. This is a “high pressure stove” running off a bottle with no regulator (as they don’t have them). I have noticed “low pressure” stoves of a similar design with different jets that do have regulators. This stove is about 4 months old.

Although you’re not supposed to do it, I had another stove, same brand same kind, that I ran on automotive lp gas. it was absolutely perfect for 3 or 4 months. i didn't want to empty the car lpgas tank I had hooked to it, so I didn’t touch it for about 9 months and when i turned it back on, it would flare up and have this same problem non-stop no matter how long you ran it for. I replaced one of the gas jets and it made absolutely no difference at all. So I put it away, bought the one I have now, and got proper LP gas bottles from a gas company, only to find after 4 months of use, that this one is starting to get the same problem, and its slowly getting worse. Even though this time I went out and bought the proper gas that it was made for. I thought it could be dirty jets, but considering new jets made no difference to the other one (that I had on automotive gas), i somehow feel it will make no difference to this one. what's going on? i can upload a video if need be.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 06:25 AM
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Hello workknight. Welcome to the Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

Every gas stove I have worked on over the years that exhibited the condition(s) you've described had a pressure related problem of some type with a regulator that was malfunctioning. Since the stove does not have a regulator, pressure from the fuel tank may be the cause and or gas flow may be the cause for the flames to act as described.

Since the stove is portable, I suggest you take it to the propane fuel supply company where you purchase the fuel and ask them what is likely to be the problem. Atmospheric Temperature and altitude also effect how the flames react.

Another suggestion would be to call or contact the manufacturer since the stove is new and likely to still be under warranty. Hopefully it was purchased locally at a retail store where it can be returned or checked by a service person. Like those at RV dealerships and or maybe camping supply stoves, etc.

You can post pictures on a separate photo web site and then link to it by providing the link here in your reply post. Use the reply button to reply back to your post here and include the link(s) to photos of the problem stove etc.
 
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Old 12-18-11, 08:11 AM
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I think you've got bad or clogged regulators. Since it's happened more than once from the same fuel source I suspect you may have contaminated fuel.

One common contaminant is water. Even when your temperatures are above freezing the water in the gas can freeze in the regulator. When the stove is acting up you can slowly pour some hot water on the regulator, making sure that the regulator's vent hole is pointed down so you don't fill it with water. If the stove works better than you've probably got water in the fuel tank.
 
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Old 01-09-12, 06:18 PM
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thanks guys. it could well be water in the line. on hot days or days when i only have the flame very low it doesn't seem to act up. sometimes the flareups even start a rythm!! i have contacted the stove manufacturer and will see what they say. I'm not a big one for taking stuff back to a store, and I feel if I do that, I will end up with a third stove that will do the exact same thing a few months later, and I will be back where I started. i noticed in the manual they mention to turn the gas bottle off, and light the stove to bleed all the gas out of the line. So as to avoid fast decompression of the line resulting in condensation in the line. However I may have only done that once, if at all with this latest stove and gas line. I am not high enough or cold enough to have any altitude or atmospheric problems. I will tell you what the manufacturer says when I hear from them.

thanks again.
 
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Old 01-10-12, 07:08 AM
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Hello: Worknight

I also agree with Pilot Dane. Most likely contaminated fuel. Water in the tank and or fuel line to the stoves regulator and possibly in the regulator itself.

Based upon your statement "sometimes the flareups even start a rythm!!" That condition is referred to as flame fluctuations. Indicates water in fuel lines, regulator and/or in fuel source. The tanks propane fuel possibly has water in it, etc.

Several ways to approach the condition to get it resolved.

Take fuel tank to a propane refilling station. Have them professionally evacuate the tank of all propane, remove shut off valve and dry out the water in the tank. Then reinstall shut off valve (or replace with a new valve, if need be) on the tank and refill with fresh propane. Buy a new tank or exchange for an already filled tank at a local big box store or refilling station. Your choice.

Next. Air dry out the fuel line and regulator while they are detached from the tank. Open the regulators flame size knob fully and air dry the hose fuel line. When regulators valve is open, allow the sun to dry out the regulator and fuel line of any water/moisture, etc. Or replace line and regulator with new. In the future do not allow a repeat of moisture to accumulate in supply lines, tank or regulator during periods on non usage.

Be advised. The existing regulator may never work correctly if water has gotten into it. The internal diaphragm may be permanently damaged. Which means it needs to be replaced.
 
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