Gas dryer shutoff valve


  #1  
Old 03-04-01, 08:44 PM
Nagoy
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I am replacing a fairly old Kenmore gas dryer the previous owners of my house left me, and in the NEW Kenmore dryer's delivery note (from Sears) it specifies that there should be a separate shut-off valve for the dryer behind it for installation.

The original dryer's gas line is running from the nearby water heater, and has no shut-off itself. I think the water heater has one, its a few feet away.

Can I leave the adding of a shut-off to the line to the dryer to the installers, if I tell them before hand. Or is this a 'DIY-able' project? I've never touched gas lines before, though I'm comfortable doing it if I knew what to do (sound familiar?!).

Thanks,
Mark
 
  #2  
Old 03-05-01, 08:22 PM
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Hello Mark

I highly doubt the delivery people will install the dryer without an already existing shut off valve on the gas pipe.

Unless I misunderstand or Sears has a different policy in your area, the installers are only delivery persons and connect the appliance as a courtsey.

Delivery persons are not trained to replace gas valves on <Live> pipes with the gas on. Live is the term we use in the industry for replacing a shut off valve on a gas line with the gas on.

If your handy, turn OFF the main house gas at the meter. Then remove the old dryers gas line from that pipe. Then remove any adaptor fitting installed on the gas pipe.

Install a 1/2 inch by 3/8's inch ball valve type gas shut off valve directly onto the steel gas pipe threads.

Most commonly, a gasline to a dryer is 1/2 inch. If that is what is currently there, the standard dryer shut off valve mentioned above will fit.

Be sure the valve is turned off when your done. turn on the main gas to the house and soap test the newly installed valve to check for leaks on the threads.

Relite any pilots on the existing appliances. If your not sure how to, call your local gas company for advice or service.
 
  #3  
Old 03-06-01, 01:18 AM
Nagoy
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Hi Tom,

The Sears delivery leaflet has a number to call for installation 'issues' like this. I don't know if a technician comes out beforehand, tags along, or the delivery guys are just gifted...in any case, its probably an additional fee.

The gas line to the dryer from the water heater looks a lot like flexible armored electric cable. I think I was expecting something more like a copper supply line. I'll have to measure it in the daytime, but it looks wider than the water heater line it branches off. How many sizes are there? I should probably arm myself with all possibilities and return the unused ones. Hope this isn't too silly a question, but does the diameter refer to the inside or the outside of the tube....to help me estimate the size.

Finally, as well as the water heater, my air heater is gas too. Presumably these should go through the shut-down procedures before shutting off the main? Sorry if these questions are a little basic - just want to make sure I understand what I'm doing completely. I'd like to be able to post to these forums again!

Thanks again
Mark

 
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Old 03-06-01, 06:04 PM
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Hi: Mark

Some confusion on the terminology used here. What I gather is the useage of the terms gas pipe and gasline are causing a problem.

Pipe and gas line both refer to the visable steel pipe.
Often times the words are used interchangeably. The solid steel pipe should be within 2 feet of the appliance.

Gas flex line or gas line <armored electric cable as you call it> refers to the flexible connector. There should only be one of these. It should connect between the appliance and the steel gas pipe.

Diameter refers to the inside size. Just ask for the size I mentioned. The steel gas supply pipe should be 1/2 inch. The standard 3/8's dryer gas flex comes with all the parts.

Not shutdown needed for the other appliances. Just turn off the gas at the main or call your local gas company.

Regarding the Sears installors in your area and what you read in whatever leaflet they pass out, I cannot comment further on. What I wrote in my first 3 paragraphs of my prior reply is all I know in general terms. There may be variations state to state and area to area.

Good Luck,
Tom
 
  #5  
Old 03-07-01, 01:31 AM
Nagoy
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Thanks Tom.

Called the number in the Sears leaflet - they didn't know what I was talking about...!

So anyway, went to Home Depot to look at what was what, picked up a leaflet, then went home and pulled out the dryer. Pretty gross what collects behind there!

Using (hopefully) the correct terminology, heres what I found:

The gas pipe comes out of the wall. Its in the corner of the garage behind the water heater, and REALLY difficult to even see, let alone reach. I had to use a torch (sorry, flashlight - I'm a Brit!) and a mirror. I thinks its 3/4", not 1/2". Theres a lever fitting on the end of it, presumably the original shut-off, and then theres a short length of copper tubing connected to it. Theres a T-connector on the end of this, and flexible gas lines come out of that (one to the water heater, one to the dryer). The line to the water heater looks like its smaller diameter (3/8"?) than the line to the dryer (looks like 1/2"). The line to the dryer is actually TWO lines to the dryer....joined in the middle.

Its a bit messy, isn't it! The shut-off is there, then, before both the appliances, but not very accessible. However, being so inaccessible, I can't reach it and definitely won't be able to check it for leaks properly. I'm not even sure about using the existing shut off there, in case something cracks when I try and turn it - it looks a bit cruddy. I'll give it a (gentle) try first, though.

I was thinking, put a shutoff on the end of the line to the dryer (the join in the middle also looks pretty cruddy, but well joined). There should be a shutoff just to the water heater, too, but again I think I might end up making things worse by uncoupling that line.

What do you think, Tom? Can I put a shut-off on the end of the dryer line for now?

Thanks again,
Mark

PS Looks like the water heater was installed in 1991, according to the paperwork, if that helps.
 
  #6  
Old 03-07-01, 05:54 PM
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Hi: Mark

Glad you clarified torch...haha...YIKES...you had me worried there for a moment.

I do follow your thoughts. You may not want to tackle the job yourself if there will be a need to work with tools behind the water heater.

A shut off valve can be installed on the end of the steel gas pipe. Then install the 3/8" gas flex line.

The steel gas pipe coming out of the wall and going to the water heater should be 1/2" The gas flex line should also be 1/2"

You mentioned copper. Depending on what state your in, copper may be legal. I wouldn't know on that topic. Laws vary state to state but I do not approve of copper for the useage of carrying natural gas.

If you think this job is going to intail more then you can deal with, contact a licensed plumber in your area.

This is about all the info I can offer you.

Good Luck,
Tom
 
  #7  
Old 03-07-01, 07:46 PM
jeff1
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Exclamation

Originally posted by Tom_Bartco


Glad you clarified torch...haha...YIKES...you had me worried there for a moment.

BVCNCBJNZGMXCVNZ;ODF

What typed on the keys when I saw the word "torch"...my chin hit the key board!! LOL

jeff.

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