cook top slow to start


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Old 03-11-01, 06:47 AM
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Our 13-year-old Tappan cooktop takes up to a minute of igniter snapping before lighting any burner. Then everything works normally. No gas odor. I have some assumptions based on similar problems but haven't located the exact same situation in the archives. Thanks for any advice.
 
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Old 03-11-01, 07:30 AM
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Welcome to the DoItYourself web site and my forum.

Hello: Rich32

There are a few possibilities that may be causing the problem you discribed.

One could be dirty or worn-out spark ignitors.
Another may be plugged ignition ports <holes> on the burner heads.
Weak ignition spark do to the worn-out sparkers.
The spark ignition module may also be all or part of the cause. It may be putting out too low of a voltage to fire the sparkers hot enough to ignite the gas.
The correct air to fuel mixture ratio may not be set correctly.
You can check and correct several of these conditions yourself. Should the module be suspected, the local appliance parts retail store can check and test it for you.

Hope this list of possibilities helps.

 
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Old 03-23-01, 08:02 PM
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Wink Cook top slow to start

Thanks Tom for answering.

For the record, after discussing my problem with a service rep, then, on his advice, scheduling a pressure check by the gas company, I removed the pressure regulator, took it to a couple of supply houses, only to find out that a new one would have to be ordered out and cost at least $75.00! Sure enough, I found a supplier on the web and the price is $69.95 plus delivery.

Well, the slow start is not really that much of a bother, so I bought a tube of pipe dope and put it back together.
The regulator looks like new inside, but it does act like the seal, which I cannot see, is just a little tacky. It does operate quite normally after the first use of the day.
That's just one of many fixin's for this house we recently purchased from a non-DoItYourselfer. Love this site! Rich32
 
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Old 03-24-01, 06:39 PM
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Clearify please... Which regulator?

Hello Rich32

Would you kindly clearify which regulator your referring to? An appliance reg shouldn't cost that much!...

I have to assume your referring to the main reg at the gas meter? Or are you referring to the stove regulator?

If your still having the problem first thing in the morning, do you mean the gas company service person made a service call to your house and tested their gas regulators pressure out of their gas meter???

If the gas company did the pressure test, what was the end result? Their regulator was okay or not? Houseline pressure out of their meter should be between 7 to 10 inches of water column and NOT building pressure upon lockup.

If the gas companies regulator is flowing correctly but fails to lockup when the flow stops, building pressure will create the very condition you state your having in the AM. Be sure to have the gas companies reg checked by them.

If your referring to the stoves regulator, it's vent cap may be plugged. The vent cap will be on top of the stoves regulator. It can be removed carefully with a needle.

The vent slot should be in the side of the hole. Some regs have the air hole in the cap. Holding it up to a bright light source should reveal a tiny hole. Clear it with a pin.

Good Luck,
Tom_Bartco
Natural Gas Energy Conservation Consultant & Appliance Diagnostics Technician.
 
 

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