Whooshing sound after replacing oven igniter

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Old 08-08-15, 11:56 AM
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Whooshing sound after replacing oven igniter

My Kenmore gas oven (model # 36275271692) was not heating so I replaced the glow igniter, a Norton style 501A, with a replacement part I purchased through Amazon. I spliced the wires from the new igniter to the connector from the old igniter and plugged it back into the oven. All seemed to go well. The oven heated up fine but after maybe 20 minutes of use at 350 degrees it made louder than usual puffing sounds when it turned on and then made a really loud whooshing sound. I thought for sure that flames would start shooting out of the oven. I shut it off and the sound stopped after 20 seconds or so. I turned the oven back on and the same thing happened twice more before the bread I was baking was done and I shut it off for good. The last time the whooshing noise happened I didn't shut the oven off right away and the sound soon stopped on its own. Any thoughts about what's going on?
 
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Old 08-09-15, 08:30 AM
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Hello megking. Welcome to the Gas Appliances topic and the Do-It-Yourself Web Site.

Hopefully you got an exactly correct as the OEM glow igniter. The sounds you heard describe a slight delayed ignition. Meaning gas does not instantly but rather milliseconds after coming out of the burner. Not an all that safe nor correct fuel ignition condition.

Be sure the igniter is correctly positioned close enough the burner. Must be correctly positioned to ensure proper ignition each and every time. Both in a cold or cool oven burner compartment as well as in one already warmed up. Temperature varies fuel ignition.

 
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Old 08-27-15, 09:29 AM
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Thanks! I purchased another igniter from a local appliance store. This one was twice as expensive but they assured me it is the correct igniter. When I went to install it there was a faint gas smell under the stove. The smell was concentrated under the stove and did not appear to be coming from the gas lines that lead to the stove. I smelled all the joints and used soapy water to look for leaks. I'm not sure what's up. Did another part of the stove break as a result of the first igniter being the incorrect igniter? or maybe several parts are wearing out at once and it's time to replace the stove. Any ideas?
 
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Old 08-27-15, 09:32 AM
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Also, my propane tank is down to 20% which the gas company said could account for some extra gas smell but it doesn't seem safe to assume that this is the problem. ?
 
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Old 08-27-15, 11:21 AM
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my propane tank is down to 20% which the gas company said could account for some extra gas smell
What ??

Are they inferring that a leak caused you to be at the 20% level ?
Or are they saying that the chemical additive is stronger at a lower propane level ?

Turn the shut-off to the stove off and see if the smell remains. It could be an internal leak inside the stove which may need to be located.
 
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Old 08-28-15, 06:05 AM
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Hello megking.

Did another part of the stove break as a result of the first igniter being the incorrect igniter?
No. Not exactly a result of the first igniter not being the correct one.

or maybe several parts are wearing out at once and it's time to replace the stove. Any ideas?
More commonly a faint gas smell inside the oven is a result of a slightly leaking gas valve. That's the part the burner tube sits on. It's internal gas valve seat wears out. Fails to fully seal. Thus a very tiny amount of gas passes thru it.

Only solution is to replace the gas valve with an exact duplicate of the original. Very common for an appliance service tech to replace both igniter and gas valve at the same time. Or service tech should replace both at the same time in the one service call IMO. Helps illuminate call backs which cannot be charged for.

Best solution I can offer based upon your follow up question and what is known now is to replace the gas valve to illuminate any tiny gas leakage. Be sure to use an OEM gas valve. Suggest you buy it locally as done with the igniter.

Once replaced be sure to leak test the gas line fittings both into the new gas valve and the lines input nut and or fitting. To be sure you did not create any leaks where there was none prior....

 
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Old 12-22-15, 07:10 PM
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Smile "Wooshing Sound" When Gas Oven Ignites

I had virtually the same experience with my 1992 Kenmore oven. This problem occurred for the first time immediately after replacing the oven ignitor. This ignitor was virtually identical in appearance to the original part. It came with a mounting bracket; so, I used the new bracket. After reading the comments on this post and thinking it over, I decided to see if the position of the igntor could be adjusted slightly to bring it just a bit closer to the burner assembly. I moved it just a bit closer by slightly bending it. Afterwards, all of the "wooshing" ( booming sound upon ignition) went away. I also noticed that the burner would ignite almost instantly upon the moment the gas was released into the burner assembly. ( Before, I could hear the gas escaping just a moment before ignition, but not any more !)
Anyway, it doesn't seem quite professional to adjust it by bending the mounting assembly; however, that is the way a spark plug gap is set for a gasoline engine. In any case, if anyone knows of a risk factor, please reply. In the mean time, I will discuss it with some of my appliance professional friends. If I find a comment worthy of attention, I will post it. Thanks, Franklin Thomas, Savannah Ga.
 
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Old 12-22-15, 07:29 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

There is original, almost like original and just like original replacement igniters. They aren't all built the same. There is a reason why the price difference is so large between them.

Many igniters can be used in more then one model or brand so the bracket that comes with it may not be exactly like the original. I usually use the old bracket unless it's rusted out or damaged.

Bending the bracket so that the igniter is closer to the burner is perfectly acceptable.

An additional problem that often gets overlooked is from age and use..... the little holes in the burner get clogged with rust. Especially the ones near the igniter. Instead of the gas coming directly from those holes.... it comes from others causing the delayed ignition.
 
 

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