Ignitor coils keep failing


  #1  
Old 04-11-01, 01:31 PM
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My 10 year old Whirlpool range/oven, model SS373PEXTO, was not getting the food cooked (oven) and I was advised that the ignitor coil was weak. I replaced the coil and the oven worked fine for about 2 weeks, then the coil failed (tip cracked). The parts store gave me a new one (warranty) and it failed exactly like the first new one did, only this time it took just 4 days. The parts store guy checked with the experts (?), then said that it had to be the safety valve not turning the ignitor off after the oven was lit and this was "blowing out" the ignitors. I bought and installed a new safety valve along with a third new ignitor. I noticed that the ignitor continues to glow brightly long after the burner lights (as does the broiler igniter as well). After a 5 minute test of both the oven and broiler. I turned it off and called the parts store. They claim that something else is wrong (they and the experts? have no idea)and still insist that the ignitors should be turning off after the burner is lit. I went through a bunch of your archive postings to try to understand the system better and found a couple of references that indicate that the ignitor should continue to glow as long as the burner is lit. Can you help me with this? P.S. I was very careful installing the new ignitor coils and never touched the tip or otherwise did anything to damage it. I've learned the hard way about this little item. Thanks for your time.
 
  #2  
Old 04-11-01, 07:45 PM
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Glow Coil

Hello and Welcome Dale to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Gas Appliance forum.

An ovens glow coil is suppose to remain ON as long as the thermostats set temperature has not been reached. Which means as long as the burner is ON.

If that is happening, then the glow coil in the oven works correctly. End of story.

The parts supply house personal are not always service reps. Therefore, they may not understand the functions nor the reason the glow coils in ovens are suppose to stay on.

Regards & Good Luck
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Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.
 
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Old 04-12-01, 06:28 AM
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Thanks for the info - that helps a lot. Any idea why the two new ignitors failed? I was extremely careful installing both of them. I didn't touch the element or bump anything as I know how fragile they are. When I purchased the first one, I had a choice between a $80 one and a $60 one. Being the cheapskate I am, I chose the cheaper one. The second replacement was also the cheaper one. The most recent one is the more expensive one, but looking at them, they are identical, same part number and made by the same company (Norton?). Will the new safety valve keep this last one from failing or is there something else I should be looking at? Thanks, Dale
 
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Old 04-12-01, 09:39 PM
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Hello: Dale

I neglected to cover the topic of quick burning out glow coils because the normal situation would not apply in your case. However, that wasn't the best idea either, since many others read these postings as well.

That being the case, the only reason I know of for a quick failure of a glow coil, besides breakage due to damage from moving the appliance, etc. is oven cleaner.

YES! Oven cleaner. If it is sprayed onto the coil or any mist gets on the coil, the coil will be history almost asap!
Even though this does not apply in your case, it's worth a mention for others to know.

I haven't got a clue as to why the prior coils failure prematurely. It could very well be do to the price. Just besure they look identical to the naked eye, they may be made with inferior quality material or something in the manufacturing the process.

If you have not replaced the fuse and the coil burns out, replace the fuse as a precaution. This is not a common 120 volt type house fuse. It is a special appliance 5 volt fuse available at appliance stores. Don't use anything but an oem fuse from a dealer. In my opinion, it is not wise.

In regards to those prior coils you installed, I guess, once again, the old saying does apply, buy cheap, get cheap?...

Regards,
Tom
 
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Old 04-13-01, 06:04 AM
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Tom, thanks for all the great advice. This helps a lot.
Dale
 
  #6  
Old 07-09-01, 08:17 AM
trippydad
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Question Premature Ignitor failure

Dale,
I am having a simalr problem with going throw a bunch of oven ignitors. How did your story end? Did you find a good ignitor, or did replacing the valve help, or???. Also, where did you end up buying the parts?
Thanks and best regards,
Chris
 
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Old 07-09-01, 03:02 PM
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For Trippydad

Fortunately, my last efforts seem to be working. To review, I changed the control valve and put in a "brand name, premium price" coil. I firmly believe that the control valve was working fine to start with, but the guy at the parts store said that sometimes it was the culprit in these situations. Most likely, the "bargain brand" coils I originally used were defective from the start. In any case, my oven is working fine now and I'm keeping my fingers crossed that it continues. Good luck with your unit. Dale.
 
 

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