Installation of gas range


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Old 05-22-18, 08:27 AM
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Installation of gas range

I just bought a gas range at Home Depot that was on a deep discount. I want to try to install it myself. I already have an electric range so the space in the countertop is already taken care of. So far i know to do the following:
  • Shut of the main gas valve
  • Add a shutoff valve
  • attache with flexible hose
  • test for leaks with soapy water
Is this something that can be done without a certified installer, doesn't seem too hard.
Also, should I get some kind of CO2 Sensor to check for gas?
 
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Old 05-22-18, 08:37 AM
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If the gas is already to the appliance location.... it should currently have a shut off valve and a cap over the end of the pipe or in the valve.

If you're mechanically handy it should not be a problem. Any fitting that gets touched, changed or added gets checked with soapy water.

CO is the odorless gas given off during burning of fossil fuels.
A CO detector won't sense gas.
 
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Old 05-24-18, 04:53 PM
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Hey Pete, thanks for the reply. I just see a pipe with a cap on the end and no shutoff valve. It could be behind the cabinet panel but I am thinking not.

The pipe was probably put in there when the house was built in 1999 and not touched since. Seems a bit rusty.

So what do people use the CO detector for? is is just to detect if there is a build up of too much CO when you are burning the gas?
 
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Old 05-24-18, 05:49 PM
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CO is a colorless, odorless gas that displaces oxygen. Since you have gas burning appliances... a CO detector is a good thing to have outside the doors of the sleeping area.

If you have a gas furnace..... a second detector on that level is also a good idea.

If there is just a capped pipe then maybe the valve was removed with the appliance and the pipe was just capped. There needs to be a shutoff valve there behind the stove. You will need to shutoff the gas to that pipe..... quite possibly the main shutoff at the meter.

When you turn the gas back on..... you check for leaks and relight any extinguished pilots like the water heater.
 
 

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