Finding gas line for stove?


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Old 02-28-19, 07:51 AM
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Finding gas line for stove?

So I want to replace my electric cooktop in my ~1960 residential house with gas. Looking under the cooktop, I see all the electric cables, but I don't see a gas line. Now, I *know* a gas line is in that wall, because I can see where the gas plumbing is behind the oven (which happens to be electric) near the cooktop, and because the wall is shared with the gas hot water heater. Under the cooktop I see a thin wood wall that was probably installed with the cabinets on that side of the kitchen. It's gotta be behind that.

So how do I find the gas outlet (which MUST) be behind the cooktop somewhere, without ripping out a large section of wall? Does a contractor have a sensor that can track where the metal pipes are located behind a panel? How does a contractor FIND the gas line in a wall?
 
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Old 02-28-19, 07:59 AM
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Is the water heater on the other side of the wall? Sounds like there is only a gas line going to it. It might be difficult to disassemble that line and hard to tell if that line is big enough to support 2 appliances.
 
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Old 02-28-19, 10:35 AM
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I agree with Mark..... since your stove and oven are both electric...... there was probably not a connection left for either. If the water heater is behind the appliances..... it should be easy to connect there.
 
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Old 02-28-19, 03:10 PM
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What I am assuming (and I think this is standard in most modern kitchens) is that the place where a stove is going it be is plumbed for both gas and electric. Gives the resident both options. The question is, how does one locate the piping, and know where to hack into the back of the cabinets? As I said, there *is* a gas connection behind my electric oven. I've seen that when I was doing an electrical connection in the wall behind the oven.

The gas water heater is ten feet down the wall. Not close. There is 220v there.
 
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Old 02-28-19, 03:52 PM
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No.... it is not standard to have both electric and gas at an appliances location. That would have been strictly up to the builder or architect or purchasing homeowner at time of build.

Typically in an all gas house..... the gas is run to all appliances.

If you feel the gas line is there.... you will need to pull the range away form the wall to check. It would be highly unlikely they would run a stub and bury it in the wall.
 
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Old 02-28-19, 04:53 PM
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It's not a range. It's a cooktop, and the cooktop is mounted on some cabinets. So I don't have a range to pull away from the wall. You remove one of the drawers in the cabinet under the cooktop, and look back towards the wall that way. We're not talking about being buried behind a sheetrock wall, but buried behind the back sideboard of the cabinets that were mounted against the wall. For all I know, there is no sheetrock behind that sideboard.

As I said, in my house, I have a gas outlet behind the electric oven. So maybe my house, and the development that we're in, is non-standard.
 
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Old 03-01-19, 04:19 AM
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I've painted a lot of new residential construction and have never seen a stove location plumbed for gas along with cable for electric ..... unless there was a miscommunication and it was set up for the wrong one. A gas valve wouldn't be hid behind the cabinet back as the back is normally up against or within a fraction of an inch to the drywall.

If you want to investigate further it's likely easiest to do so on the water heater side as that wall would be easier to patch. If running a new gas line you'd want to just drill a hole thru the back of the cabinet anyway.
 
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Old 03-01-19, 05:27 AM
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A gas valve wouldn't be hid behind the cabinet back as the back is normally up against or within a fraction of an inch to the drywall.
Mark said it right here. If a gas line was installed as an appliance option. it must be valved and exposed.
 
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Old 03-01-19, 07:54 AM
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Well, I just told you that I had an oven that was plumbed for both. Behind the oven, it wasn't valved, just plugged. Who says it has to be valved? A plug is more secure than a valve. Not at all clear there is drywall behind the cabinet. No sense in having a kitchen wall not outfitted for cabinets, so why would you even bother to put in drywall? Before the cabinets were put in, the gas line certainly would have been exposed.

I just went up in my attic, and followed the gas line running along the attic floor past the T-drop to the water heater where it heads eventually to the furnace. There is clearly another T-drop in the line where it passes my cooktop vent. If that isn't going to a port behind my cooktop, I have no idea where it is going!

But in answer to my question, I now believe that magnetic sensors can easily locate metal pipes, and even properly tuned stud sensors can do it. I'll get someone to come out and do an assessment. Just need to determine where that pipe is, and exactly where it terminates.
 

Last edited by diffl; 03-01-19 at 08:39 AM.
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Old 03-01-19, 08:48 AM
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You are correct, a plug is better and would be used to cap off an appliance that was no longer in use. If an appliance (gas stove) was there it should've been valved. And a plug or nipple and cap would've been added after the valve. Yes the valve could've been removed and then pipe capped. But I don't see why it would've been buried in the wall.

No sense in having a kitchen wall not outfitted for cabinets, so why would you even bother to put in drywall?
I don't understand this. All walls regardless of what room or use should be dry walled. Then if needed cabinets can be installed. Not all kitchen walls need to have cabinets on them.

Are you the original owner or second owner?

Can you send in a pic of your layout.
 
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Old 03-01-19, 09:32 AM
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Yes, the electric cooktop that is there was probably original - probably 50 years old. You can imagine why we want to get rid of it! Parts simply don't exist anymore. I suspect there never was a gas cooktop there, so the lack of a gas valve isn't surprising. We are third owner, but have been here for 25 years.

Now, there are several large scale renovations being done in our neighborhood, and I can say for a fact that when the kitchen cabinets are torn out, such that they will be replaced, there is no drywall behind them, and the renovators don't put any drywall in before the new cabinets are installed. These are inside walls, so there is no insulation to constrain.

This is what I'm looking at, under the cooktop.

Name:  cab.jpg
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The brown pressboard wall in back is the back of the cabinet I'm looking into. You can see the bottom of the cooktop at top. Obviously, the electrical connections were strapped onto that brown pressboard wall. (The yellow cord is just my shoplight.) I believe that *somewhere* behind that brown pressboard wall is a gas line. The question is - where? Do I have to remove that whole back wall to get to that gas line, or can I make a smarter penetration? As I said, I think the answer is YES. There are tools that will let me locate that pipe behind the pressboard wall. If they were smart, they didn't put the electrical junction box right over the gas line!
 

Last edited by PJmax; 03-02-19 at 02:40 PM. Reason: inserted picture from incorrect link
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Old 03-02-19, 08:08 AM
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So it sounds like no one here has any experience with pipe-locating sensors. If I go online, it seems to be a common tool. Would be nice to know how accurate these are, and how they are used.
 
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Old 03-02-19, 02:18 PM
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You picture never came through.
There is a device you can use to look through walls. It's called a WALABOT. I have one and it does work. It goes for about $75 on Amazon. You are able to see thorough walls and locate pipes wires and studs. It uses your smart phone as a screen. It can even detect rodent movement in walls.

https://walabot.com/diy
 
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Old 03-04-19, 09:15 AM
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I see the picture on my display. It's at https://www.doityourself.com/forum/a...-stove-cab.jpg if it isn't displaying for you.

Thank you for the info about Walabot. It "sees" 4 inches deep, which is pretty slick. So it can view the entire thickness of the studs. That's exactly what I was wondering about. I'm not likely to do this job myself (the do-it-yourself part for me is assessing the doability), but it means that service professionals have the tools to do what I'd like to see done.
 
 

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