GE Monogram range wont simmer

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Old 12-06-19, 04:07 PM
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GE Monogram range wont simmer

Hi there, new to the forum, happy to be here. I recently bought a used GE Monogram 48 inch dual fuel range, model ZDP486NDP4SS. I'm having trouble getting the burners to work on the simmer setting, and when they're between high and simmer, they make sort of a fft fft fft sound. Not a technical description but pretty accurate. Any ideas, anyone?
Thanks!
 
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Old 12-06-19, 08:33 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

One thread is allowed per topic. This is yours.

There is usually a low adjustment for simmer so that the flame stays running reliably.
However..... adjusting anything higher over the simmer position should be ok.

Are all the burners doing this ?
Can we assume natural gas ?
Almost sounds like a low pressure issue.
How does the oven work ?
 
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Old 12-07-19, 07:54 AM
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Thanks for the reply, Pete. The ovens are electric, so they're fine. It is natural gas, and all of the burners are doing this. What should the pressure be? And how do I check it? It's a new gas line install, there was gas to the furnace and water heater but the kitchen is a significant distance away from the meter, and this is a big stove, so the gas company came and did a meter split. They installed a 2 lb regulator to feed the gas line to the kitchen and I had the stove hooked up by my plumbers, who installed the gas line.
 
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Old 12-07-19, 10:10 AM
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You said "It is natural gas...". What specifically is natural gas? Is your stove configured for natural gas? Is the gas in your house natural gas?

You said you had a 2 psi regulator installed for the stove. Are you certain that is the pressure the stove needs? I have gas distributed through my house at 2 psi but I also have a regulator at each appliance to drop down to the required working pressure.
 
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Old 12-07-19, 02:09 PM
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The gas in my house is natural gas, and yes, that's what the stove is configured for. I don't know what the pressure requirement for the stove is, I've been unable to find that information yet. When you say you have a regulator at each appliance, is that in addition to the regulator already installed with the appliance? I'm not terribly familiar with gas appliances, so I relied on professionals to hook the thing up correctly. If an additional regulator was required and they neglected to install it, I'll have to have a talk with them. If the internal regulator for the stove is not functioning, that's my problem to fix and I'm happy to do it as I got a very good deal on the stove and don't mind spending some money to get it operating the way it should.
 
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Old 12-08-19, 05:43 AM
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Most appliances do NOT operate at 2 psi. 7 in/wc (.25 psi) pressure is a much more common pressure. 2 psi is used to allow a smaller size gas line. If your stove is a upgrade from your previous stove the piping in the wall of you home might not have been big enough to deliver enough gas for the larger stove. Running 2 psi allows them to get more gas through the smaller line but it does mean another regulator might be required at the appliance to drop the pressure down to what the stove needs.
 
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Old 12-08-19, 10:18 AM
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Thanks for the reply. It is a 1/2 inch gas line that's approximately 65 feet long, so that's why the 2 lb regulator was installed. I understand about the need for an additional regulator, but I'm unclear if you are suggesting one in addition to the one that is installed in the stove itself, or are you referring to the one in the stove? Thanks!
 
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Old 12-08-19, 03:56 PM
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If your stove has a placard, manual or any other documentation stating the supply gas and pressure. That is what you must feed it. Any regulator in the stove is designed to work with that required inlet pressure.
 
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Old 12-08-19, 09:15 PM
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Looked a couple things up.
Spec for stove said 7 to 13 water column at the stove for it's regulator which runs at 5 water column.
Also found 1 water column equals 1/28th psi.
So you should have about 1/3rd psi at the stove.

So if my math is correct your supply regulator is too high,
But then again I am not a mathematician or a gas guy.
 
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Old 12-09-19, 05:35 AM
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I agree with Manden's assessment. It is very unusual for a gas appliance to be fed with 2 psi and another regulator is required to drop the pressure required by the appliance.
 
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Old 12-17-19, 05:37 PM
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Update: plumber came today and installed regulator. All works like it should now, it was a pressure problem. Pressure was too high...glad to have it taken care of. Thanks everyone for your replies and input.
 
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