Propane cook stove oven control knob issue


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Old 01-31-23, 01:22 PM
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Propane cook stove oven control knob issue

The on/off and temperature control knob of my gas oven became harder and harder to move. I was unable to pull it off to clean it so I tried using pliers to pull it off. This caused a whoosh of flame underneath the stovetop. I was able to shut it off, finally, but a few days later I found the center of the front of the top of the stove, just above the oven control knob, was very hot. I could see a small flame, like a pilot light, under the stovetop.

By turning the knob "more off", whatever was leaking under there stopped leaking and this unwanted "pilot" was snuffed out. Another few days went by with no issues (aside from being unable to use the oven), then I found that flame on again, bigger and hotter. It had caused the control knob to soften enough that it was easy to turn, and I turned it past "off" and again the flame was extinguished.

Well now I am not comfortable having any gas going to that stove at all until I can fix whatever has gone wrong under there. What should I be looking for under there?
 
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Old 01-31-23, 03:19 PM
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"What should I be looking for under there?"
Start by looking for a brand name and model number.

I don't know what stove you have so I can't offer specific advice. But... stop using the appliance. Pull the stove out so you can get behind and shut off the gas supply.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 03:32 PM
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I did shut off the gas but first I opened the lid and sniffed around where the unwanted flame was. There is definitely a leak there. Unfortunately the way this house was configured, shutting off the gas to the stove means also shutting off the only source of heat. So I will have to disconnect the stove from the gas line altogether and put a plug in that line for the time being. Then I will photograph the apparatus from which the leak was coming and upload that here.

The make and model of the stove are not apparent, and I have not been able to move the stove away from the wall yet.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 04:36 PM
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Here is the defective part. I can't tell precisely where the leak is coming from... I tried using soapy water, spread the juice all over the thing but couldn't see any bubbles forming. The top of the image shows the extension going to the control knob. It was covered in black soot which I cleaned off. Incidentally this stove has not been moved away from the wall since it was put in about 20 years ago (and it was already old back then), nor have I removed the stovetop in at least 15 years. I have tried to move the stove but it will not budge.

The long wide tube running horizontally underneath is the gas supply.


 
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Old 01-31-23, 04:52 PM
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Sorry.... I service these appliances but cannot recognize yours from that picture.
Does this range have a pilot light ?

A larger picture may be a little more helpful but without a model number I can't offer any replacement parts.

It looks like the oven valve is a part of the manifold which means it may not be replaceable.
The entire manifold with valves would cost more then a new stove.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 05:43 PM
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There are two pilot lights for the four burners, plus one pilot light under the oven.

What are the "A" and "B" called in the image you posted?

I will try to get you a photo of the whole underside of the stovetop.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:00 PM
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There is actually an A, B and C.
A looks like the oven pilot.
B looks like the oven burner.
C looks like the top side pilot(s).
 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:02 PM
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Is this helpful?



 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:10 PM
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I am going to have to put a brass plug in the end of the gas line where the pressure regulator goes in now. That is, *if* I can get the regulator off, and *if* someone in my tiny town has the right size brass plug for sale. Meanwhile since I can't move the stove to find out if there's a shut off valve back there, and I can't find a separate shut off valve in the crawl space for the cook stove, I have had to shut off all the gas to the house, and thus have lost my only heat source. It's going down into single-digit temps tonight, so this will be loads of fun. I couldn't have gone anywhere today anyhow because everyone is snowed in.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:12 PM
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Try lifting the stove top. The older stoves had a shutoff under there.
I need just the model number. I can't read it off that.

I can also see manufactured by ????? for White Consolidated.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:27 PM
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White Consolidated was part of Kelvinator and early Westinghouse. (originally sewing machines)
Later they merged with Electrolux.

Many of those stoves were manufactured in Canada too. Might not find any info on those models.

They had a recall on stoves back in 1997..... recall.
 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:31 PM
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I don't see a shut-off under the stove top.

Model # MPF300PBWB
 
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Old 01-31-23, 06:35 PM
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I corrected your model number. Your second guess was correct.
That is a Frigidaire stove. Built in 1995.
Not seeing an oven thermostat available...... OEM 5303935014 P1
Sear's Parts Direct exploded views
 

Last edited by PJmax; 01-31-23 at 06:51 PM.
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Old 01-31-23, 07:03 PM
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part #5303935014 oven thermostat is no longer available but maybe an aftermarket part is, or maybe it can be repaired?
 
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Old 01-31-23, 07:08 PM
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There was one listed incorrectly on ebay. A substitute would not be available as that's a custom valve.
Rebuild may be possible. I'll check.
 
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Old 02-01-23, 11:08 AM
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It got so cold in here by late last night that I had no choice but to turn the gas back on. I can smell the leak if I sniff close to the oven thermostat but it is quite small, no more than one would get with an unlit pilot, and with the stove top and knob gone it escapes instead of catching fire inside there.

I have a cast-iron three-burner counter-top stove that I might be able to connect to the line that is currently connected to this old stove. I wonder if the pressure regular will fit. I had been using the counter-top stove for camping, connected to a five-gallon propane bottle, so if the connection to the propane bottle is the same size as the connection to the propane line at this failing stove, I suppose it will work.

I still hope to be able to get the leaking oven thermostat repaired.
 

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Old 02-01-23, 11:53 AM
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I have a concern about connecting the counter-top stove to this line. It appears that whoever installed the original stove here ran the copper line up from below through a hole in the floor, then flared and attached a fitting on the end, and in order to attach it to the stove, the copper line had to be bent somewhat. I can see the crimp in it (and can post a photo if needed).

My concern is this: Since the pressure regulator on the big stove can't be moved, the only way to have enough space to connect the regulator from the counter-top stove will be to un-crimp the copper line enough to make room for the end of the other regulator. Will that make the copper weak somehow? Reconnecting to the original gas stove (or its eventual replacement) will require re-crimping to the original position. If removing the crimp didn't weaken the copper, will re-crimping it do so?
 
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Old 02-01-23, 12:22 PM
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You can not re-crimp. If the fitting needs to come off the end of the copper has to be cut off. To re-install a fitting you would then need the correct flaring tool. There are different flare angels so you have to use the correct tool. Using the wrong tool can crack the copper.

Since you don't have a shut off valve behind the stove I would get a gas 1/4 turn shutoff valve. Install that on the flexible copper coming through the floor. Then when you fix or replace the house's stove use a gas appliance hook-up hose. Big box stores sell them as a kit with adapter fittings fit most fittings.



 
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Old 02-01-23, 12:42 PM
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It appears the copper line was brought up thru the floor and bent directly into the back of the stove.

You would need to cut that copper line coming up the wall, have a flare fitting installed and then install a gas shutoff valve.
 
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Old 02-01-23, 01:02 PM
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Pilot Dane, the copper line currently in place is not flexible. Aside from that I am unable (so far) to move the stove at all. There isn't enough room to do any work on the gas line; the only thing I can do for now is possibly connect the portable stove. But I won't even need to do that if perhaps there is some unorthodox method to permanently seal up that leaking oven thermostat without removing it. Can that be done? If so, I will manage without an oven until such time as I can remove and replace the whole stove.
 
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Old 02-01-23, 01:20 PM
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The oven thermostat bolts on to the gas manifold. There is no easy way to remove it and cap it off.
You will probably have three holes where the screws were as well as the hole where the valve sits.

You would have to turn off your propane service.
Lift the stove stop and disconnect the copper line from the regulator in the back right corner.
Then pull the stove and make your changes.

It may be time to replace the stove as I'm not having much luck with that thermostat.
 
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Old 02-01-23, 01:39 PM
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Can anyone suggest a method for getting that old stove out? It's been sitting in the same place for almost 20 years and I haven't been able to get it to budge.
 
 

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