Old gas stove w/Bryant pilot has oven problem


  #1  
Old 08-29-01, 06:02 PM
J
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I have an older gas stove made by Western Stove Company and it has an intermittent problem(but occurs very often) where the over will heat up to about 250-300 degrees and then shut off. Sometimes it will start up again after a while, but often I have to turn it off and wait a long time and then it will start up and have the same problem. Occasionally it will work long enough to cook, but that isa rare,

The stove has a Wilcolator thermostat(control valve) and a Bryant pilot device(w/2 pilots and a bi-metal strip). I have removed the Bryant device and opened it up to check the lever and the large ball bearing for freedom. The lever, when it is not hooked to the bi-metal strip, is completely free and so is the ball bearing. I have also cleaned out the orfices that direct pilot flame towards the bi-metal strip.

Could it be either the thermostat or the Bryant device causing the problem. I've been told that this is a typical problem associated with a Bryant pilot device that has a rusted and frozed lever, but that isn't the case here. So, is there something else with the Bryant pilot device that could be causing this problem, or is it possible for the Wilcolator control valve to cause this kind of problem.

I don't mean to seem like a know it all, what you see here is the extent of my knowledge about this stove, all learned this week. But I think I probably will have to replace one of these two devices, and I don't know enough to decide which.

Please tell me if there is another possiblity besides these two cited above, I'm learning as I go.

Thanks for any help.

John
 
  #2  
Old 08-29-01, 08:44 PM
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Hello John and Welcome to the Do It Yourself Web Site and my Gas Appliances forum.

I'm impressed. Let me congratulate you for a written posting and your knowledge of the parts and there functions. Now the sad news.

To the best of my knowledge, replacement Bryant lighters aren't available. Neither are any of the parts. I could be incorrect on this. Search the web.

You'll need to reassemble and reinstall the one you have and test it. It's very possible the Bryant lighter bi-metal warp strip is wornout.

Be very careful during reassembly. If the lighter fails to function correctly, there will not be any means to shut off the burner gas should the pilot go out during oven useage.

There must be a delay between the time the thermostat is turned ON and the burner lights up. If gas comes out of the burner immediately, the lighter is failing.

If your efforts to correct the problem fail after reinstalling the lighter, it could be the thermostat. However, they usually do not display the problem you discribe when defective.

Check the control panel also. If the stove has a clock and timer that doesn't work, unplug it. Sometimes this will help to bypass the optional functions and allow manual oven operation.

Check under the stove top near the right hand or left hand side about mid point. There may be a solenoid valve there if the stove has timed bake and or a keep warm cycle. If you locate this device, disconnect it and re-test the oven.

Hope some of these suggestions are helpful.

Regards & Good Luck
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Tom_Bartco
Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.
Please be advised that although I have spent 18 years in the service industry, I am currently working in the office. Some diagnostic information provided is exclusively from memory....
 
  #3  
Old 09-09-01, 09:04 PM
J
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Hi Tom.

Thanks for the information and the help. I have tested the Bryant lighter by heating the bimetal strip(at the point where the pilot heats it) with a propane torch, and it seems to work normally, moving the lever enough so that it moves under the ball and that lifts the ball up a bit. The propane torch was probably hotter than a pilot light, so I'm not sure if it was a realistic or accurate test. And BTW, there is a shop here in LA that rebuilds Bryant lighters, but they charge $200 for the job, and having taken mine apart, I'd be hard pressed to see how they could even charge $50.00 because there isn't much to do inside. Free up the lever, replace the bimetal strip...I'd be surprised if they ever had to machine the seat. They also sell the thermostat valve for about $200.00. Fortunately there is another stove closer by that sells the Wilcolator valves(rebuilt) for around $80.00.

I have a couple of questions for you. First, when I reassemble the Bryant lighter, there is a large threaded plug that screws in above the stainless steel ball chamber. Is there a sealant that I should use on those threads, or just tighten them nice and tight?
Second, is it possible to convert this stove(or any stove) to a more modern safety pilot setup? You're the second professional who has warned me about the dangers of the Bryant lighter. And since I don't like leaving the pilot light on all the time, and have been lighting the primary pilot with a match, I have been unwittingly exposing myself
to a dangerous situation.

And finally, is there a way to test the thermostat valve
after the oven has shut off prematurely? Or, is it possible to replace the sensing tube without replacing the entire valve, as a cheaper way of testing.

Thanks again for the help.

John
 
  #4  
Old 09-10-01, 01:46 PM
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Hi: John

There isn't any means I know of to test a thermostat at the home nor retail parts store level. These items are simply replaceable with new units or rebuilt units by service persons.

The sensing element part of the thermostat contains a vapor charge. During the building of the part, the charge is added and the element is sealed. Since it is an integral part of the main unit, it cannot be replaced seperately.

Pertaining to the Bryant lighter, I would suggest you use only a light oil on the threads during reassembly.

Although conversion parts may be available to replace the Bryant lighter, I have not seen any done by appliance service persons. You may want to inquire at the local appliance parts store.

Basically, Bryant lighters were will built and have outlasted the normal life of most ovens. When the ovens are totally wornout, it's replaced with new units. Used appliance dealers salvage the parts from these replaced units, rebuild the parts, refurbish the appliances for antique appliance customers.

Regards & Good Luck
Tom
 
 

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