Westinghouse-no gas to oven

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  #1  
Old 11-03-01, 02:00 PM
vscj
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We have a westinghouse gas with glow coil ignition.After reading the other post none quite fit my problem
First-oven doesnt heat
2nd-glow coil is ok...glows as should
3rd-regulater valve replaced but it still doesn't work
When turned on the coil works but there is no hiss or gas smell. what is suggested?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-03-01, 03:06 PM
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More Detailed Information Requested

Hi: vscj

Most ovens have what is known as an isolation valve. This tiny valve has a lever on it and it's located at the beginning on the gas feed supply to the ovens gas valve. It must be in the ON position to allow gas to flow to the ovens gas valve.

If you need to locate it, follow the aluminum gas supply tube going to the ovens gas valve back from the valve to it's opposite end.

Usually it's on the main gas supply manifold which supplies gas to the top burners. At other times it could be located in the oven under the lower oven panel, behind the stove, under the oven, etc.

I'm mentioning all this because you stated the regulator was changed? I'm assuming you mean the ovens gas valve and not the appliance regulator. The two parts are totally different and do not do the same type function.

If it is infact the appliances regulator that was defective prior and it was replaced, I would have to know why? It's not a part that often becomes defective without a pressure problem causing it to become damaged.

My suggestion would be to reply back with more history on the appliance. What happened prior, who fixed it and appliance age and type...{{{freestanding stove with oven...built in oven...type of gas used}}}...other info that I can use to determine {interpret} what may be the actual problem.

Regards,
Tom
 
  #3  
Old 11-03-01, 04:05 PM
vscj
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I apologize I did mean valve.It was problem that just occured one day when we tried to use the oven, no prior problems. I replaced the valve after this.This is a natural gas freestanding stove with oven that is about8-10 yrs old.The burners work but not the oven. The valve your speaking of is on.
 
  #4  
Old 11-03-01, 04:55 PM
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Hi: vscj

Thanks for the updated and more complete information. No appologies needed.

I very often can determine an appliances problems by phrases used, discriptions of problem occurrences, appliance history, models, types etc. I often look for 'Key Words' 'terms' or 'Key Phrases.'

Based upon both postings, I would suggest you replace that glow coil. Do not assume the glow coil isn't defective simply because it glows.

Here is why:

If it's orange in color while glowing, then it is not glowing hot enough to function correctly. A hot glow coil, working correctly, will glow an intense bright yellow orange in color. Too much orange, any reddish color or a dull orange means the glow coil is weak. Glow coil and gas valve replacement, should be done as a set. It is often done this way by appliance service persons to avoid a later problem with the unchanged part.

Each wire should be checked through it's entire length. Check each electrical connection, terminal and junction connection. Also check for loose wires between the glow coil, gas valve and every switch.

The current gas valve could be defective. Have it tested or replace it.

Do electrical tests and continuity tests on several of the other parts. However, be aware that neither of these tests will provide proof positive the part being tested is actually functioning correctly. Therefore, do not rely solely on either test.

Good Luck,
Tom
 
  #5  
Old 11-06-01, 04:12 PM
wonderskink
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gas valve

I would not replace the gas valve and glow coil "as a set to avoid further problems". the gas valve is bad probably less than 1 percent of the time. Replacing multiple parts is done by folks that don't know how to diagnose problems. Have a competent person connect the ignitor to a wattmeter. That will tell you if the coil is indeed weak or not. 99 times out of a hundred it is the coil that is at fault. Replace the coil, as Mr. Bartco has wisely advised, if you cannot bring the part to anyone to check. Gas valves can be very expensive.
 
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