anticipator setting


  #1  
Old 11-11-01, 07:34 AM
Dave_CA
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I'm installing a Honeywell CT50A Heating thermostat and it requires an anticipator setting that ranges from 0.18 to 1.0 Amps. I don't see anything on the old thermostat to indicate this nor do I see anything on the gas valve.

Is there any way to find this setting based on the model of the gas valve? The house was built in 1962 and I believe this is the original heater. The valve was made by General Controls, B60 Gas Valve, Cat B60YS53C112, Ser K1AA, 1/2 PSI G-LP. I'm wondering if the 60 might indicate 0.6 Amps. Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 11-11-01, 12:57 PM
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Hello: Dave

The heat anticipator is not on the furnace nor gas valve.

It's on the thermostat's body just under the front cover.
It looks like a rheostat indicator and usually has a pointer arrow.

The anticipator is used to balance the temperature swings between the desired room temperature and the actual temperature.

If the anticipator swing temperature is set too far, the room temperature will drop too low before the furnace cycles on. Conversely, the furnace will remain on too long after the thermostats selected room temperature is reached.

To obtain the all around best selected average room temperature, set the thermostats room temperature selection and then adjust the anticipator to one of the highest or lowest settings.

Then notice how the furnace cycles on and off and the room temperature readings before and after each cycle. Tested correctly and allowing one or two hours between anticipator setting changes.

You will notice how the heated area {house, room etc.} gets warmer after the heater just cycles off. You'll also notice how the area {house, room etc.} gets cooler before the furnace cycles back on again.

The above is called the temperature "Swing." The function of the heat anticipator is to control the swings.

The actual numbers in amps isn't all that important for the intent of this forum. What is important is the setting you desire, which can be obtained by using the anticipators adjustment selections.

Regards & Good Luck
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Tom_Bartco
Energy Conservation Consultant & Natural Gas Appliance Diagnostics Technician.
 
  #3  
Old 11-14-01, 05:09 AM
Dave_CA
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Tom, thanks for the reply. What you said makes sense and I now see that the Troubleshooting section of the thermostat manual talks about adjusting the anticpator setting if the temp swings are too large.

As a side note, let me tell you what it says in the Installation section of the manual and you will see why I was looking for info on the valve.

"If installing CT50A, make sure you have the current (anticipator setting) for your system. The anticipator setting will be set at one of a series of numbers representing the (electrical) current rating of the primary control of your system in amps. This information can be found printed on the primary control at the furnace. The primary control is usually a gas valve, zone valve, or a relay or burner control box with the thermostat wires connected to it. Set anticipator setting indicator at rating printed on primary control."

It also has a caution that says "If your anticipator is set too low, it may burn out."
 
  #4  
Old 11-14-01, 03:46 PM
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Hello Dave

I read your posting regarding what the so called service manual/instructions whatever say. I agree with you, they can be confusing and complicated etc. But they do explain it in terms that are relevent to the gas control.

However, that is exactly why I do not often get too deep into all the techno babble etc. in my replies. I am concerned that I may further add to the problem, confusion etc.

My only intent is to help someone understand how to correct a problem or answer a question with a reply in "Laymans Terms."

I am glad to know that you understood what I was hoping to explain on how best to adjust the setting. Once you make the required adjustments to the anticipator that best suites your needs, you'll not have to adjust it again.

By the way: Often times I think the booklets that come with some products in general are designed and worded to confuse us all...

Best Regards,
Tom
 
 

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