Boiler hot water discharge

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  #1  
Old 10-07-02, 12:58 PM
dorian-13
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Boiler hot water discharge

Need help to identify the cause of hot water discharging (escaping) to outdoors from our boiler fired hot water heating system (4 zones). Just turned it on and all 4 zones are being heated perfectly. However, noticed that about 3-4 gallons per hour of hot water is escaping to the outside through a 1" diameter pipe. Have now shut down the system until I can figure out why so much water is escaping. Would appreciate some ideas (any) as to why this is happening before I run to the heating specialist to come out and look at it....(thanks).
 
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Old 10-07-02, 04:03 PM
bigjohn
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Can you follow the pipe back to the boiler? I'll betcha it goes to the relief valve. Try lifting the handle and see if maybe there's just some junk in the valve. If not, then either the valve is leaking or your system pressure is too high. Is there a pressure guage on the front of the boiler? How many lbs. does it indicate?
 
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Old 10-07-02, 04:16 PM
dorian-13
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Hot Water Boiler Water Discharge

Thanks for the advice! I will check the release valve as you suggested. Also, the pressure seems pretty normal to me. When I turned it on the needle pointed at about 20psi, as I recall. I'll turn the system back on and see. The problem may be with the pressure release valve. Never thought about that...
Thanks again!
 
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Old 10-07-02, 04:38 PM
bigjohn
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The relief valve should be set for 30 lbs. [actually it's a fixed, non-adjustable setting] If you've got 20 lbs. of pressure AND the guage is accurate, then the relief valve is probably leaking which is a common occurence.
 
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Old 10-07-02, 06:07 PM
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boiler

like john said look at the relief valve. pull it a few times. also if you have an auto water fill on this boiler when it was down and cold it could have put more water in it and that is what you see comeing out the relief valve now.Most of the old gauges dont show right either. ED
 
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Old 02-15-09, 03:34 PM
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Hello. I'm having the same issue. The pressure release is releasing h2o it seems when the pressure hits 30, when the furnace is on. The water really stinks, like cat urine! Probably from the minerals in the h2o as we have hard water.

This just started. Should the pressure release be releasing so much h2o?

Should the pressure be getting to 30 when the furnace is on?

Is the pressure release valve easy to replace?

Thanks,

Bob
 
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Old 02-15-09, 05:08 PM
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Pressure Relief Valve

It sounds like the valve is operating normally. The pressure should not get to 30#. Some pictures of the boiler & nearby piping would help. You can post them on photobucket.com or similar site & provide a link here.
 
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Old 02-15-09, 07:59 PM
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Hello Grady,

Here's my furnace: http://i713.photobucket.com/albums/w...8-01-08001.jpg

It's a Weil-McLain oil fired, hot water boiler. The 3 zones are over on the left, one circulator pump for all 3. The dark stain on the floor to the right is from the water, from the pressure release valve, after it evaporated.

At the end of the "on" cycle, the psi hits 30 while the temp hits 160.

Does this help any?
 
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Old 02-15-09, 10:12 PM
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Originally Posted by PCsByBob View Post
Hello Grady,

Here's my furnace: http://i713.photobucket.com/albums/w...8-01-08001.jpg

It's a Weil-McLain oil fired, hot water boiler. The 3 zones are over on the left, one circulator pump for all 3. The dark stain on the floor to the right is from the water, from the pressure release valve, after it evaporated.

At the end of the "on" cycle, the psi hits 30 while the temp hits 160.

Does this help any?
As Grady said, the pressure shouldn't be 30. I'd be looking at the expansion tank.

Troubleshooting a Hot Water Boiler - Expansion Tank Has Excess Water and Inadequate Air
 
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Old 02-16-09, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by pfd27 View Post
As Grady said, the pressure shouldn't be 30. I'd be looking at the expansion tank.

Troubleshooting a Hot Water Boiler - Expansion Tank Has Excess Water and Inadequate Air
Alll rightee then... seems the expansion tank is suspect. It is quite cold on the bottom, indicating it has more h2o in it than it should. Knocking on it sure sounds like it's full of h2o also.

The valve on the bottom has a needle valve in it. First: pushing it up did nothing. Second: how can I drain several gallons by just pushing this valve in? That could get quite tiring.

There is an air pressure release above the tank. Does that come into draining the water somehow?

Thanx!
 
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Old 02-16-09, 11:20 AM
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Rarely can you determine anything about a diaphragm-type expansion tank by feeling its temperature or rapping on the side. If you get nothing out of the tire valve on the bottom (no air and no water) then it is likely that you have just lost the air charge. If you get any water from the tire valve then the diaphragm has ruptured and you need to install a new tank.

If you have no water then you can try to recharge the air by first turning off the make-up water valve to the system and then lowering the system pressure to zero by draining off some water. Do not drain any more water than necessary to drop the pressure to zero. Then, using either a tire pump or an air compressor add air to the tire valve and bring the pressure back to a level of 12 to 15 psi on the boiler gauge. Again drop the boiler pressure to zero and then using a good tire pressure gauge check the pressure at the tire valve. If it is less than 12-15 psi (it will be the first time) then repeat the addition of air and draining of water until the pressure at the tire valve is steady between 12 and 15 psi with no pressure on the boiler gauge.

When you achieve this steady state you can then open the make-up water valve and allow the pressure in the boiler to stabilize at the setting of the make-up regulator. This should get you back in business.


If you DO get any water from the tire valve then you have to replace the expansion tank. This requires you to have the new tank ready to install and then you turn off the make-up water, reduce the pressure to zero and start to remove the tank. You will want to cover the boiler with a sheet of plastic because you will have a fair amount of water fall out when you remove the old tank. Also, the tank will be quite heavy as it is full of water so be careful. Install the new tank and turn on the make-up water and you should be okay to go.

You may want to install a valve between the expansion tank and the air eliminator fitting rather than just the tank, this will make it easier to replace the tank the next time it fails, which may not be for many years.
 
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