Heat Pump Question

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  #1  
Old 11-05-02, 07:38 PM
pghrepair
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Lennox Heat Pump

My townhouse has a Lennox heat pump. No matter how high you set the thermostat the house never gets comfortably warm. Its always chilly. I always keep the filters changed. is this the way heat pumps work or is there a problem. Last year I had it checked and he said it was fine that I was used to gas heat. i cannot believe that everyone who has a heat pump has a cold house all winter! can you help me out? thanks
 
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Old 11-06-02, 03:57 PM
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check

your inlet/outlet temps. make sure your strips are not on, what is the temp rise?
 
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Old 11-07-02, 12:56 PM
pghrepair
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Heat Pump

I do not understand what you are asking me to check. I don't know what you mean by checking in/out temps or what strips are and so on. Could you please give me easier instructions! Thanks...
 
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Old 11-07-02, 03:33 PM
STIMPY21
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Inlet = temperature in your return filter grill, outlet = register in the floor or ceiling.Temperature rise is how much hotter air is coming out or the floor or ceiling register than it is sucking in at the return. Example: 65 degrees at return and 80 degrees at the register is 15 degree temperature rise. If you can get 15 degree rise without the electric strips that would probably be ok.
STIMPY21
 
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Old 11-19-02, 06:01 PM
pghrepair
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heat pump

Hello,

The air temp at cold air return is 73 , at register is 100. Is this normal? Also the water valve for the humidifier was shut off. I turned the water back on. What do you mean when you say electric strips.
 
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Old 11-19-02, 06:36 PM
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pghrepair:
The effect of humidity on human comfort is one of the most neglected and misunderstood subjects.
The human body to be comfortable needs to be surrounded by a humidity level that doesn't cause perspiration on one's body to evaporate too quickly. This will cause a cooling effect, which may be happening in your case. The other end of the spectrum is that in too high a humidity the sweat on your body will not evaporate at all and gives you a muggy feeling.
The generally accepted comfort level is 40% - 50% relative humidity.
Not only turn on your humidifier, but service or have it serviced to ensure it is working properly. Also, there are digital temperature/humidity indictors available that are not too expensive. I stock a Honeywell one that sells for about thirty dollars. Very easy to sell when I explain the above to my clients.

Another thing to check for is drafts from poor fitting doors and windows and the effects of large inneficient windows.
 
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