Baseboard Sizing

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Old 12-11-02, 07:54 AM
a12
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Question Determining the Length of Baseboard for Rooms

Is there a rule of thumb, or a simple formula that the contractors use to determine the length of baseboard heat for each room of a house? I have a Weil-Mclain gas boiler, forced hot water. A few of the rooms seem to be cooler than others and the length of baseboard in these cooler rooms appears to me to be shorter in length than in other houses that I have owned with similar room sizes. So I am curious to find out if what I have is enough for each room. Any comments would be appreciated. Thanks
 
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Old 12-11-02, 10:32 AM
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Hot water

You have to run a heat loss on the rooms. But this is what you want to know Slant fin baseboard is.

heat output at 200 Deg F water temperature, 4 g.p.m. flow is 720 BTU per foot.
Thats what the good book said. ED
 
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Old 12-11-02, 12:08 PM
rclhvac
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Rule of thumb- cover the outside walls with as much baseboard element as possible
 
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Old 12-19-02, 01:15 PM
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The short answer to your question is NO. There is no simple way to calculate the amount of baseboard. You are probably now living in a house where someone thought there was a simple way. The ONLY way to get it right is to do a heat loss calculation on the house. It is not very difficult if you have all the construction values that pertain to your house. I can do it with you over the telephone if you need it done. I do not agree with blanketing the walls with baseboard. And I use 580 btus per foot of standard capacity baseboard because I use 180 degrees for rated output. It is not wise to make your boiler have to run at 200 degrees just to get the output you need. Just like many areas of every trade, there are many opinions about which is the best way to do a job. I have been calculating my own heatloss for 22 years and have never had to go back and make changes due to improper sizing.
 
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Old 12-19-02, 06:51 PM
rclhvac
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I only use 180-190 water temps. Never had any problem with any that i've installed.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 11:14 AM
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hot water

Sorry but The book-------- Rates base board at 200deg no one said you cant drop it down.But you will lower the BTU output. I to run them at 180 to190 and they work ok But he asked what the out put wasfor the base board ED
 
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Old 12-20-02, 04:05 PM
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If every radiator on the entire zone was being changed, the way to calculate would be a heat loss on the entire zone. If one radiator is being changed, the sequence would be, measure the radiator and count the sections and convert to square ft. of hot water radiation and then to btus. Then CAST IRON baseboard could be installed in place of the radiator. Not copper finned baseboard. Copper finned baseboards output is rated at every temperature from 110 degrees all the way up to 210 degrees so you can match it to your system. You also have to determine what your design temperature is. In my area I design for keeping 70 degrees inside while it is 0 outside. I'm sure it is different in other parts of the country.
 
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