boiler room venting


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Old 12-20-02, 12:33 PM
chrisgod1
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boiler room venting

I installed a bathroom exhaust fan last night the burner puffed back(house stinks)the repair guy told me to seal off the boiler room and put a dryer vent in the window in the room.Im unsure wich way to put the vent (louvers insde or out)or is this even the right thing to do any help is appreciated
 
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Old 12-20-02, 01:01 PM
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AIR

If you are talking about combustion air for that burner you need 1 sq" per 1000 btu on the burner. Thats for most codes. I dont see how a dryer vent is the thing to use. But if you do, the vent would have to swing in to let air in when the fan is on ED
 
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Old 12-20-02, 02:17 PM
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Depending on whan brand of oil burner you have, you might be able to buy an air intake kit that matches your burner. There is also a company that makes a universal intake kit I will try to find a link to a site to show you what I mean. You definitely do not want a dryer vent kit unless you plan to rip out the backdraft flap. Then when the wind blows in the winter you will have air conditioning too. Let us know what brand the oil burner is (not the furnace or boiler just the burner) and model if possible. It should be on a tag right on the burner.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 02:59 PM
fesjr
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If you are going to use the vent idea, you actually need 2. One is piped to about a foot from the floor, the other is left as it is. This is needed to creat airflow. Without both it won't work. You can buy a power venter that is wired with the burner and only runs when the burner runs. Also they usally mix ambient air with the ouside air to keep the intake from bringing in very cold air during the winter.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 03:50 PM
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Actually, the preferred method is to connect the fresh air inlet directly to the burner inlet and use 100% outside air for combustion. That totally prevents infiltration and provides adequate air for combustion. Some burners don't have a fresh air intake adapter so the best you can do is to bring fresh air near the burner and let a small negative pressure open the damper that allows outside air to reach the burner area. It prevents the wind from blowing into the boiler room every time a blizzard rolls through. Unless fesjr is located somewhere that temperatures reach well below 0, I have never heard of mixing ambient air with outside air. If your climate is more severe than the northeast US, you might explore the possibilities.
 
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Old 12-20-02, 04:34 PM
bugsmeso
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The manufacture "Field Controls" makes a fresh air kit for oil burners that bring fresh directly into the burner
 
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Old 12-21-02, 05:19 AM
chrisgod1
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This is a beckett 519150 .Will connecting it to fresh air allow me to use my bathroom vent without affecting the burner? thanks for the help
 

Last edited by chrisgod1; 12-21-02 at 06:06 AM.
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Old 12-21-02, 06:25 AM
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Field makes an intake kit that fastens to the burner and lets you bring outside air right into the burner with 4" dryer vent pipe. Use hard pipe or aluminum flex, not the plastic flexible. The only other concern is if you have a draft regulator in the flue pipe between the boiler/furnace and the chimney. If you do, you still can't run the boiler room in a negative pressure or you will draw flue gasses from there. Here is a url for that product.

http://www.fieldcontrols.com/contractor/cas1-2.html

I would suggest that you block off the draft regulator. Unless you have a 40 foot chimney, it is not saving you much cash anyway. Just get a tee cap the correct size and clamp it in place. You might consider having an oil burner technician come and check your work and adjust the burner for smoke & C02. Good luck.
 
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Old 12-21-02, 06:37 AM
chrisgod1
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what are my options as far as using the bath exhaust fan without affecting the burner.I also have a oil fired hot water heater in the same room.thanks again for the reply.This is a ranch with a basement.Thats where I relax so I want to cut down the noise and odor and still use my 200 dollar bathroom exhaust fan
 
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Old 12-21-02, 06:53 AM
bugsmeso
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did you install the bath exhaust to draw air in or draw air out. In is OK...(But expensive)for fresh air, but natural draft is fine if opening is large enough, draw air out is bad.......you are creating a negative pressure situation in the room
 
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Old 12-21-02, 06:57 AM
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The saga continues.
You could put an intake kit on that serves both units.

The cause of the problem is your bathroom fan evacuating the house of air. You can open a bathroom window if you want and that will make the problem go away. Not an acceptable solution in my book. What your bath fan is trying to tell you is that your home is built tightly. No drafty windows or poor sill seal or anything. When air leaves the house, air needs to come back in. The lesson to be learned is that your furnace and water heater also evacuate air from the house every time they run. If you closed up the house on a cold night and both units were running, you could get a similar problem. They will eventually run out of air for combustion and start burning poorly. You might not find it because as soon as someone opens the front door to let the service man in, the air pressure is equalized again. So if you don't do it for the bath fan, do it for the heat/hot water systems. The ultimate fix is an air to air heat exchanger. It isn't too hard to install but it isn't cheap either. It gives fresh air a path into your home and heats it with air that is already in the house.

A reality check would be to turn on the bath fan and open the bathroom window 2 or 3 inches and feel the amount of air that needs to find its way into the house to replace the air the fan is exhausting.

You could build a room around the furnace and water heater. Put on a door that seals well and allow outside air to reach that room. It will be cold in there in the winter and not easy to build because of the ceiling having plumbing & duct penetrations.

Sorry to get so lengthy but you will have to make the decision on this one based on all the facts and solutions. Good Luck
 
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Old 12-21-02, 11:31 AM
chrisgod1
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thanks for the info youve been a great help!
 
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Old 11-23-10, 12:07 PM
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Cold combustion air...Resurrecturing an old interesting thread??

This is exactly what I am interested in doing.
I now live in a century old home that was designed with coal stove individual room heat, no electric, primitave, if any plumbing, no insulation, drafty windows....no automobiles......no closets......the drift..
If I succeed, the new home will be newer, but with an antique boiler system and oil.
I'd like to bring it into the 21st century, even if kicking and screaming.
Cold combustion air is a must....I had no idea it was so complex, but it is.
An exterior boiler using coal might be better..
More to come.
 
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Old 11-23-10, 12:11 PM
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But, as I see it, you need about 3 to 5 times that size for the necessary air.
A dryer sized vent set-up would be far too small.
Better too much than too little.
 
 

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