HELP!!! Heat pump keeps tripping switch

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-10-03, 03:04 PM
sync497
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
HELP!!! Heat pump keeps tripping switch

Hi, I have a Trane electric heat furnace
The problem I am having is with the furnace/heat pump.
When the heat comes on, It keeps tripping the electric circuit
breaker. And when I do get it back on after I reset the breaker
it goes to aux and guess what? I have to reset the breaker.
Up and down the stairs up and down the stairs again.
I had the out side unit replaced because the compressor was bad.
So I was told. Ac works fine all summer.
But it's winter now and I cannot maintain a temp without the
help of a space heater. I have to put a space heater in the
same room as the temp gage, but it still trips the breaker.
Had the breaker switch replaced at the cost of $198.56
I think I got robbed? The unit in question was installed in 1986
Do I need to buy a new furnace or a higher voltage switch to correct
the problem?
Sorry it's sooo long.
 
  #2  
Old 02-10-03, 03:37 PM
hvac4u's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: NW atlanta
Posts: 3,145
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
tripping breaker

go to home depot and see the price of the breaker for your self. nuff said on that...OUCH! sounds like there is a short in the high voltage to your heat strips. turn off the breaker and look inside the unit. do you see any burnt/loose wires? your strip may need restringing, just a thought
 
  #3  
Old 02-10-03, 03:43 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,837
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
The change...

Nothing has changed, has it? So why should you need to replace the furnace? Lets try isolate the problem. I think the compressor is shot! Try this..., kill the power to the outdoor unit, and pull one wire of the compressor contactor coil. Do you understand what that is?
Also, get a long screwdriver and try spin the blade of the outdoor fan, does it coast easily? If not, the fan may be bad we can isolate to find this out as well, we'll do that later.
Do you have a disconnect switch within reach of the outdoor unit? Get me answers to those questions and we'll find the culprit lickity split.
PS when you pull the wire to the contactor coil, tape it so it won't short out the transformer, then apply power, and see what happens ,and write back and explain exactly what you did! If you have a disconnect switch beside the unit, keep it off till you reset the breaker, control the on and off testing from the outdoor disconnect switch. Do a visual inspection of the electrical control box, if something is fried, you'll usually see indicators there.
 
  #4  
Old 02-10-03, 05:55 PM
sync497
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for replying.
I had the out side unit replaced because the compressor
was bad. (Got new unit) The breaker was replaced also
because it had melted. So both were replaced.
but that was during the summer and everything was
working fine until winter came and that's when I started
having problems again with the unit shuting off.
(breaker tripping) I was having this very same problem
during the summer so that's why I had the out side
unit replaced. other then that I don't know what else
to do. I don't know anything about AC/heating.
I can change the filter.. ha, ha
 
  #5  
Old 02-10-03, 07:02 PM
hvac4u's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: NW atlanta
Posts: 3,145
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
could be

a wiring problem, wires could be shorting out between the panel and a/c. you need a good, experienced tech to look at it.
 
  #6  
Old 02-11-03, 04:57 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,837
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
repairs

replacing the outdoor unit may have been a quick fix but it appears the problem is still there! A goo HVAC tech will be able to tell you the problem without too much difficulty. It should have two separate dedicated electrical circuit breakers. One about 30 or 35 amp , this is for the outdoor unit, and one about 50 - 60 amp for the indoor unit. My company would refuse to put them on one circuit,because they require their own protection anyway in the form of a fused disconnect, this cost is offsets anything saved using one circuit. It appears you are drawing too many amps from the equipment serviced or there is a short . This may be from corrosion in the fuse panel due to water leakage corroding the connections causing a high amp draw. Get a pro involved...
 
  #7  
Old 02-11-03, 06:18 AM
sync497
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the infor.
HVAC tech is coming today to look at the problem again.
I guess I might have to buy a new electric furnace.
Because last time they came, they installed a new heatpump
unit out side. Trane 1986 model. Toooo old????
Thanks


Maybe this is important.
Have to set temp as same as room temp because
when I try to increase the temp to around 70
the aux kicks in and that's when the breaker tripps
can set temp to 70, but the breaker will tripp.
but at 64- 66 it's fine for a long time. (room temp)
 

Last edited by sync497; 02-11-03 at 07:11 AM.
  #8  
Old 02-11-03, 02:47 PM
bigjohn
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yes sir, that's very important. The C/B that's tripping- does it supply power to the outdoor section or the indoor section of your system?
 
  #9  
Old 02-12-03, 04:55 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,837
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
Air handler...

I wouldn't recommend replacing the air handler unless the cooling coil had leaks in it. Just have the air handler repaired. It may have a bad contactor, sequenser, or need a new element, these repairs are push pull...don't sweat it. I would be asking myself WHY didnt the circuit breaker trip before it melted down??? Have the tech amp the draw, and check the temperature rise , this should be about 55F above the return temp. I think your problem is in the heating elements,.... most likely one is shorted and causing too much resistance...have the tech show you the problem and explain why it was tripping, you'll sleep alot better knowing the whys to the problem, keep in mind your purchasing confidence in his ability to isolate and identify problems, and solutions. If you don't TRUST him...get someone else , and if he does good work for you, call his company and give him an attaboy!
 
  #10  
Old 02-12-03, 12:53 PM
sync497
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Problem fixed. I think for now.
Tech came this morning and put a new breaker
for $195.00 Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh
He told me the breaker was bad. even through it
was replaced last year and he told me: yeah, it
goes bad sometimes, even if it is new.
That's almost $400 that I spent on breakers.
I wish I could do it myself.
Thanks all for reading and replying.
 
  #11  
Old 02-12-03, 02:18 PM
KField's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 3,245
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If I may be so bold

You need to find a service company that you can trust. That breaker story doesn't cut it with me. If you have a high current draw, you will eventually ruin a breaker but Yours was almost new. Don't be surprised if the same thing happens next year. Did the guy at least look at the heat elements? I'm thinking he did NOT. If there is something wrong in there, you will have trouble very soon again. I think several hundred dollars is a little salty for a $25 breaker and a half hour of tech time.

And they wonder why people want to DIY. You get better information right here than many others in this forum have gotten from high priced SO-CALLED technicians.

I'll bet if you had a service contract with them, they wouldn't replace the breaker every year, unless it wasn't covered.
 
  #12  
Old 02-13-03, 01:06 PM
sync497
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
hey, at first they had some kind of repair kit for the furnace
then I told him about the breaker problem and that's
when he check it and took the old one out. it was some where
between warm and hot. So that's why he replaced it and
never used the repair kit for the furnace.
He did check the furnace and said: it's ok
so did the last company. o(
 
  #13  
Old 02-13-03, 03:23 PM
KField's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 3,245
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It would have only taken a minute to snap an amprobe on the wires and check the draw. Thats one of the things that makes a breaker hot. It also could reveal a high draw that exceeds the breakers rating. Too many tech are parts-changers today and don't really get to the bottom of a malfunction. You may have heard the saying 'do it right, or do it twice'. There is a lot of truth in that. Good luck with the new breaker.
 
  #14  
Old 02-14-03, 12:01 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 18,386
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
HEAT PUMP

I think I went over the hole 9 yards here but didnt see for sure If anyone there pulled the wires on the strip heaters and ring them out. Just each strip can be replacednot the whole blower unit. Didnt sync say that they had heat till the AUX kicked in. Some of the others asked did the tech amp out anything. Well did anyone amp out the unit inside an outside that you have ???Id say go buy your own amprobe here.
ED
 
  #15  
Old 02-15-03, 08:30 AM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 1,837
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
strip heaters..

I think were all agreed there is a connection between the strip heaters and the circuit breaker. First did you get a look at the old breakers?Were there signs of corrosion? I had breakers corroded in my own house (NEW) that had water coming into the fuse panel by way of the main outdoor wire inside the insulation, it ended up being the rain cap was cracked. This made for a bad connection that caused high amp draw on the breaker. Also do you have copper clad aluminum wire? Many homes used this cheaper wire and it requires burdees grease and annual tightening if it does. The breaker should never draw more than 80% of its rated capacity ( except for the inrush amperage ), I'd disconnect the wiring at the air handler and amp the disconnected wiring at the fuse panel, any draw will show up on that end if there is a load of any sort anywhere along it's path. Reconnect the wiring. Then read the data plate...it will tell you the minimum size of the breaker required...does it meet this ? With the t'stat all the way up, (this may take up to 10 minutes for all the sequencers to kick in), amp each bank of heaters, amp only one conductor wire at a time, the heaters are usually the same size, do they all amp the same?
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: