Extremely Dry or Extremely Humid, Why?


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Old 02-26-03, 10:34 PM
J
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Question Extremely Dry or Extremely Humid, Why?

I realize that air is dryer in a home in the winter and humid in the summer, but our house is so dry that I have some bleeding in my nose. In the summer, the humidity is so bad that when stepping out of a shower, it is impossible to get dry because you are sweating from all of the humidity. It is almost unbearable when doing housework as well. What is causing this and what can be done?
 
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Old 02-27-03, 04:52 AM
firsthvac
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I've encountered this problem quite a few times and it is definitely not a one answer type of question. In most of my cases the cause was either too large/too small of a system for the home or not enough/inadequate air movement. Oversized units bring excessive heat into the space during the winter while not being able to run long enough in the summer to adequately remove humidity (has occurred with both heat pump and gas/electric systems). Too small of an air flow caused the units to run a higher outlet temperature in the winter but did not allow full use of the indoor coil in the summer resulting in a lack of proper humidity removal. A couple of times the cause was found to be an improper refrigerant level. Too much or too little can drastically affect the way a unit works.

There are other possible causes too. Whether you have a heat pump or a furnace-a/c combination, it would be best to have your unit and ducting evaluated by a local HVAC contractor who is well experienced AND been around in the area for a while. Check with your friends, co-workers and neighbors to see who they use and if they are happy with the service provided before selecting a company for the job. Word of mouth is an excellent indicator of quality and reputation.
 
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Old 02-27-03, 05:26 AM
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Question More info please.

julbox3134:

firsthvac is correct in that your system is not up to the task.

For the humidity problem in the winter you need to have a properly functioning humidifier.
Do you have one that is possibly not working?

The high humidity in the summer can also be corrected by a properly sized central airconditioner. Too high of humidity when airconditioning is working is a symptom of an oversized unit.
Do you have an airconditioner?

More info on your situation would be helpful.
If you read the B-4 Posting at the top of this forum, what we need to know is there.
 
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Old 02-27-03, 01:28 PM
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Wet Or Dry

The good book calls for about 35% to 45% humidity in the winter with the heat on and about 50% in the summer with the A/C on. So It can be a lot of things here for your home like was said before.Get a hvac company to go over everything in the home . from the size of the furnace to the size of the A/C. Also look at the duct work that you have. See if the humidifier is working if you have one. ED
 
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Old 02-27-03, 04:54 PM
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ED:

I wish I was able to read from your "good book"!

My "good book" says the lowest winter setting should be about 20%.
At 45% our average windows would supply all our families drinking water at 30 below temperature.

Maybe julbox3134 will tell us a little more about his situation.
 

Last edited by GregH; 02-27-03 at 05:23 PM.
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Old 02-27-03, 06:42 PM
H
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Location....

Where is this? You can't just get 45% RH at -10F unless you want the house to rot.... If you live in a cold weather climate too much humidity can cause major house problems...ie. the humidity can perm thru the walls and cause paint to peel on the outside of the house. The Moisture can condence in the insulation and rot the framing, especially if you don't have a very well sealed interior. If you look at the humidistat it will in most cases tell you what setting is safe at certain temperatures. A too dry of an atmosphere will also cause furniture glue joints to loosen, you might be seeing this on wooden chairs or cabinet panels. If it's too wet in the summer, your unit is most likely oversized. You can try slow down the fan speed , this may help some..Make sure your not sucking in outside air, this will make it rain in the summer time...Shut off the water fill to the humidifier if you have one...let the sump dry out, till you need it in NOV...One other thing to check...your return. If it's in the attic, a return line may have fallen off, or poorly connected, this will suck in damp air in the summer. Has it ever run good?
 
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Old 02-27-03, 06:48 PM
H
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Assuming...

I think we are all assuming, you do have air conditioning ,and it brings the temp down to 70F.
 
 

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