More of a Heating Question

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Old 04-21-03, 03:03 PM
dougd
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More of a Heating Question

We're adding an addition to our home. In truth it is a replacement of a porch with attached shed that are getting torn down this summer.

We have sun coming across our field from 10 a.m. until sunset so we'll have a nice collection of windows for passive solar. But this is NH and this addition will be built on the windward side of the existing structure. The size of the addition is 14'x37' and will be split, not evenly, into a bedroom and an extension of the current kitchen.

We were thinking of putting electric baseboard heaters into the bedroom as we won't be tapping into the furnance to heat it. The room that will be ajoining the current kitchen will have a small wood stove but am thinking about putting some kind of heater in there as well. My thoughts are that the current furnance may not be able to heat this area very well and there is a problem with existing foundation/new foundation and costs, coming off a Chapter 13 bankruptcy of a contractor I hired, he filed, I'm paying.

What are the alternatives to electric baseboard heaters? Would propane be more cost effective? In NH we have some of the highest electric bills in the nation and we want to avoid some of the pain when it comes time to pay. I'm putting some faith in the passive solar part to aid some.

My apologizes for the length of this but am hoping I painted a good mental picture to work off of. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated.

dougd
 
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Old 04-21-03, 06:57 PM
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Question More info please.

dougd:

It would be helpful to have more info on your house.
Size, heating system etc.
More about what we need to know: http://forum.doityourself.com/showth...hreadid=122673
 

Last edited by GregH; 04-22-03 at 04:44 AM.
  #3  
Old 04-24-03, 03:55 AM
H
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Thumbs up home shows

Look around for some home shows, I'm not sure if the BIg E is still there for Springfield, MA but they had heating alternatives I saw one year for pellets that fed a woodstove like deal but the pellets were made of defective / or excess corn, and it had a conveyor belt feeder. The guy said the bags of corn were available everywhere. I do remember seeing them somewhere like Costco....I think they have some kind of catalitic heater and an air pump but it put out quite a bit of warm air. You could use your electric as back-up set for 60F and the wood stove or pellet stove for the rest. NH has tons of wood though....
 
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Old 04-24-03, 08:16 AM
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All these are government sites that may interest you;
http://www.ornl.gov/roofs%2bwalls/facts/index.html
This one concerns new construction techniques.

http://www.nrel.gov/wind/
This one concerns low wind technology.

http://www.nrel.gov/photovoltaics.html
This one concerns solar panels.

http://www.nrel.gov/documents/trombe_wall.html
This one concerns passive solar energy walls.

http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumeri...riefs/bd4.html
This one concerns vapor barriers and air barriers.

Each State, including yours, must provide Renewable Energy (RE) programs and Energy Efficient (EE) programs. In most States these programs are administered by the State's Regulatory Board and implemented by your local Utility. The incentives for these programs vary from State to State. For example in California, solar panels have rebates up to 50%, whereas in New Jersey it is as high as 70% of cost of installation. Not the cost of the product, but the cost of installation. Funding for these programs also vary, example in New Jersey they set aside $125,000,000 per year, while other States it's about $100,000,000. per year.

Besides the very large funding for these programs and the number of different programs, (I did not list all of them because it would overwhelm you.) most States provide some type of technical advice. Including statistical data on feasibility and design at no cost to you.

If you are interested in any one of the programs or wish to find out more about these programs in your State, contact your local Utility and/or State's Regulatory Board. If they do not provide you with the information you want or you fail to get in contact with the right people, contact the U.S. Department of Energy and/or U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and they will get you in touch with the right people in your State.
 
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