which type of heating

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  #1  
Old 05-08-03, 06:00 AM
sue garner
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which type of heating

hi...

i'm in the process of begining the design to build a house, and am completely new to this, so.....in the northeast...new york state in sullivan county, what's the most efficent and healthy and of course cheap type of heating to use in a home??

do solar panels work in this area...i've been told yes, and no.

thanks for any info you can give..

sue garner
 
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Old 05-08-03, 06:36 AM
Brewbeer
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sue, a couple of questions:

Do you want central air conditioning?
What is your budget for the heating system?
What are your fuel source choices? (generally, oil, natural gas, propane, electricity)

Based on the efficiency and healthy criteria, in-floor hydronic radiant heat would be the best, but most expensive, option to install.

Hot water heat is the best for comfort, especially when combined with panel or cast iron radiators.

Forced air heat will likely be the least costly to install, but it has drawbacks.
 
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Old 05-08-03, 06:53 AM
sue garner
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hi brewbeer..

thanks for your reply. i don't care that much (i think..i don't really know though...you see, this is all so new)) for having central air conditioning.....because i bet it's expensive, but....i am very interested in the radiant floor heat, but need to know how to figure out the cost. the house is going to be pretty isolated, and i won't be there all the time, so need to think about making sure the pipes don't freeze too. is there a place i could look at to figure out the relative costs (of installation, and future costs..).....and also the health concerns of different options??

thanks,
sue g
 
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Old 05-08-03, 10:54 AM
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heat and cool

Go over to www.warmair.net there you can compare the fuel cost for where you are. Then go to http://heatinghelp.com
Thats where all the wet heads are and you can find out about hot water heat. If you do want or need AC in this home I would go with hot air heat. You can put hot air in the floor also with a counterflow furnace. This works real good ED
 
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Old 05-08-03, 12:28 PM
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Hi Sue,

This home going to be your "weekend" home??

Planning on this being your retirement home down the road?

Does it have a basement in the plans?
 
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Old 05-08-03, 04:17 PM
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I suggest a high efficiency oil system with a puff switch (draft sensor ) and a safety control with a dry contact alarm output for remote notification of a lockout.

Ken
 
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Old 05-09-03, 06:56 AM
sue garner
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hi...

this won't be a weekend home...i plan to move my work in there, but i won't be there all the time, and it could be that a month or so could go by without going there.

as far as having a basement, i am leaning towards building on a slab. why should i have a basement, when it will just mean trouble for water, and it has to be heated, and it cost to build it??

thanks again.....
sue
 
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Old 05-09-03, 10:14 AM
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basement

You should look at the code there for homes.Can you do the slab there with what we call a grade beam and let the whole home float??? Or do you have to put in a footing and go about 4' deep.If so you only need 4' more of basement wall and you have doubled the sq ft. of the home for a very low cost.Will the home be on any kind of slope. Lots to think about here Sue

ED
 
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Old 05-09-03, 06:50 PM
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I'd do the slab then if you don't want to spend the money, and where you really don't need the extra space with out a basement.

Basements are nice to have extra space to store things, or make more room of the home..

Anyway, For a place that is only going to be use once in a great while at times, I'd go with a forced air system and 80% eff. furnace.

Your not spending alot of money on a raditant floor heat, and don't have to worry about the "slow" recovery of hot water heat when you do turn on the heat in the building that has been turned off or set very low while it's empyt.
 
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Old 05-10-03, 07:17 AM
firsthvac
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Just a couple thoughts to ponder Sue--

You expressed concern over water damage in a basement, so I'm sure your concerned about unexpected wet damage from freezing radiant systems when you're away. There is also the more costly and reliability problems with radiant components when compared to forced air (just read the radiant problems in this forum) as well as the lack of quick comfort gratification when you get back home due to a slow recovery time as mentioned by Jay11j.

Since this will be your home but you will be away for extended periods of time...and with overall operating costs of a properly installed system being about equal...maybe you should seriously consider using some type of combined hydronic/forced air system. Installation cost is about middle of the road but potentially costly and inconvenient problems are fewer. Initial heating is more readily available through use of forced air and the comfort level is more cheaply maintained by the radiant heating. You'll have peace of mind knowing that when the temperatures suddenly drop while you're gone, the forced air heat will better recover the the space temperature by reacting faster, therefore allowing you to keep a lower thermostat setting on both systems while you're gone. You'll get the gratification of 'instant' heat when you get back and have a back up source of heat should one type of system fail. Additionally, you can always add a/c to the forced air system down the road if you need/want to (and doing the ductwork during building is much cheaper than as an afterthought)

I know it's a compromise on installation/maintenence costs, but the long term benefits of preventing deep winter problems from a lack of sufficient heat (both in the home and healthwise) are worth it according to many of the northern/mid-west/eastern retirees who come out here to AZ and have it in their winter homes.
 
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