Air vents don't blow any air?


  #1  
Old 05-30-03, 07:44 AM
silversvt26
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Question Air vents don't blow any air?

I have a 2 story home with 1 central air unit. My house is approx. 1900 s.f. The ac unit is 3yrs old and is supposedly big enough for a 2100 s.f. home. My question is that the upstairs vents hardly blow any air at all out of them. So we have to have the downstairs very cold in order to have the upstairs at a descent temperature. Is this normal or is their anything I can do about it? The furnace in the house is approx 10yrs old. Any help would be appreciated.
 
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Old 05-30-03, 11:01 AM
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Sometimes in the basement there are zone dampers on the ducts. You can try dampering down some that feed the 1st floor to send more air upstairs. If you don't have dampers they are very inexpensive and pretty simple to install or some diffusers give you the ability to close them off. Also do you have returns upstairs? If not look into getting a couple installed.
 
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Old 06-04-03, 01:53 AM
tinknocker86
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First thing, I am assuming that you have a basement door, if you do you must make sure it is always shut durring the AC season, this is becase the cold air is heavy and it will fall to the lowest point, making your basement into a walk-in cooler.
Next, I recommend that you close all af your doors upstairs on the second floor. Again, all of your cold air will go to the 1st floor if the doors are open on the upstairs rooms, those rooms will be robbed of the air needed to cool those rooms. Being that you have a newer home, the contractor that designed your heat and AC system, should have put at least one supply and one return in each room, except the bathroom, and walkin closet. This will create a little system in each room and when it is time to go to bed, the room should be nice and comfortable, as long as you keep the doors shut durring the night.
The final tip I recommend, is that you should close all of the dampers that supply air to the basement, because basements are usually cool and people dont spend as much time down there as the first floor living area. Air does not need to be blowing out of the register in the basement in the summer months, only the winter months. Remember to open them up durring the heat season, because heat rises, this will make your floors warm in the winter.
If all of this fails the next step would be to balance the system, trying to make an equal amount of air go to each heat run or supply if you will. For example, if you have alot of air comming out of a first floor supply, find where it is comming from in the basement and close it a quarter turn, not all the way. Then go to the next supply on the first floor until it seems there is more air going upstairs. Kind of like robbing Peter to pay Paul. This will give more air to the upstairs supplies.
Please let me know how this works or if you have any questions about what I wrote. This has help my customers in the past and my good friends. Two story homes can be tricky to cool down, but these tips should help. Remember Cold Air is heavy and it needs help to stay where it is needed. Warm is light and is easier to keep where it is needed.
 
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Old 06-04-03, 08:47 AM
silversvt26
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Thank you for the replies. My house does not have a basement, it only has the first and second floor. As far as returns are conderned, you will have to forgive me as I am not very knowledgible in this area at all. I have 6 vents on the first floor and 2 return vents or what i guess is a return vent, one is in the nook area and the other is in the hallway. Their is no vent in the bathroom downstairs. Their are 2 vents in the living room, 1 in the dinning room, 2 in the kitchen/nook area, and 1 in the laundry room. Their are large grills in the ceiling which I assume are return air vents and when I look up in them I can see wood and beams. Upstairs I have 5 vents, one for each bedroom and one for each bathroom and only 1 return vent in the hallway. When I hold a piece of toilet paper up to the return air vents in the ceiling the paper just barley stays up their. I have a slab house. Thank you again for your time and help.
 
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Old 06-04-03, 09:59 AM
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You gotta love the common return in the upstairs hall. They use these common returns in apartments alot and cut about 2" off the bottom of the bedroom doors and expect to get return to flow through. Bad design. Try balancing like Tinknocker describes and consider getting returns installed in the bedrooms.

Hey Tinknocker, Your 1st tip of keeping the basement door shut brought back old memories of a replacement I did about 10 years ago. After finishing up and everything running great I get called 2 days later and she's complaining that it's not cooling. I go there and sure enough the "ranch style home" is 76* and the basement door is open. You go downstairs and the basement is 67* ! I tell her she needs to keep the basement door shut because the cold air falls to the basement. Well she acts like that's just impossible and I need to fix it. Wow that was a tough one to explain to this lady without making her feel stupid and upsetting her but it all worked out in the end after about 45 minutes and finally her husband came home and set her straight and thanked me for being so patient with her.
 
 

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