How important is cold air returns?


  #1  
Old 06-03-03, 08:48 PM
bryan77
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How important is cold air returns?

Ok I have a 2 story cape cod style house 1400 sq ft, and I have 1 heat run in every bedroom, and of course as the way to do things back then was to put the cold air in the floor on the 1st floor around 18" by 36" long..................... Yrs ago when I was working in residential, each room had its own seperate cold air........... is this worth while trying to get each room to have its own cold air return, and if so do these normally go on an inside wall or outside or there is no prefernce........... In some rooms I get good air flow, and in others I get barely enough....................In the basement I have 1 main trunk and all the heat runs tie into this, Now im no tin nocker but that doesnt seem right, it looks like an octopus in my basement, could this be my problems?
 
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Old 06-04-03, 04:39 PM
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returns in every bedroom, living room, dining room and hall etc is better than a centrally located return, this will not affect supply volume though, as you menton some are weak. not sure what you mean by all lines supplied by one trunk, yet looks like octopus. generally a trunk will have individual runs coming off as it reduces in size to keep pressure up. where is the furnace located? i am assuming one system for a 2 story home?
 
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Old 06-04-03, 05:06 PM
bryan77
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Yes it is 1 system for a 2 story house, located in the basement. When I say 1 trunk, I have 1 duct work that comes from the furnace, im guessing 8" by 16" that has all 9-6" vents for the entire house. Hope this helps. Should the returns be on an interior wall of the house?
 
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Old 06-04-03, 05:22 PM
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yes

returns on the interior
 
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Old 06-04-03, 06:15 PM
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The path of least resistance

One way to increase air volume to a particular drop is to reduce the resistance. hardpipe and metal elbows are less resistant to air flow. Flex pulled tight and straight also. The returns for each room arn't too important as long as you keep all the doors open to the rooms it services. Choke down the airflow to one will force it to go to all the others....its a balancing job unless your job has none....then your very limited. A perfectly sized system can be done without dampers, but rarely.
 
 

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