Swamp Cooler - Size & Installation

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Old 07-14-03, 01:33 PM
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Swamp Cooler - Size & Installation

Hi,

I am looking to install a swamp cooler in my house. There has never been one before.

I have two q's related to this:

1) How to determine the CFM of the unit. I have seen a formula (ft^3/2 = CFM), is this correct? Seems a little high since it computes a much higher CFM than is easily available (building centers...).

2) How to tie into duct work. What seems most logical to me is to tie into my existing furnace's cold air return. Is this OK, or are there reasons not to do so. If it's OK, do I then block the cold air return trunk from the house and only feed it swamp cooler air, or do I leave the "regular" CAR open and let both air streams mix?

I would like to tie into the duct system since (by my thinking) each room would get some cooling; I wouldn't need to leave bedroom/bathroom/[any room I don't want the dog to have access to] doors open.

FYI, I live N. CO, lately temps are around 100F with an RH ~40-50 at midnight, dropping to ~10 by noon and staying low for the majority of the day.
 
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Old 07-14-03, 02:55 PM
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evaporative cooling

All the units have the cfm on them a small 1/3 hp about 2000 cfm On up to the big ones at 5600 cfm on a 1 hp.. I have never heard of any one trying to put it in the duct work in a home on the furnace,I know I dont and have put a lot in. Think about it you want to put air in the home ,it has to get out some where. So if its blowing in and you open a window in a room down the hall the air will go down there to get out. So if you open all the windows a little all the room will get the air. If you blow this wet air in your duct work for the furnace you will have a mess. ED
 
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Old 07-15-03, 09:03 AM
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Thanks for the reply Ed.

I guess I wasn't clear on the first question though. What I meant was, How do you compute the needed CFM?

IE) An 1800 ft^2 house needs a cooler that moves _____ CFM.

Thanks
 
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Old 07-15-03, 10:21 AM
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cooler

The good book said for where you are

Cubic ft of home---divide by min. per air change, where you are at it's 3 so I get at 0"static pressure 4800 cfm for the home. Or a unit with about a 3/4 hp on it. That would give you a 5000 cfm.
This is out of Grainger. ED
 
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Old 07-15-03, 02:05 PM
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Thanks for the info Ed!
 
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Old 07-15-03, 02:17 PM
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cool

With this you put it so it will blow out like in the center of the home. Then you open the windows in the rooms you want to cool and let the air go out that way dont put this into the furnace duct work. ED
 
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