Fresh Air Heat Exchanger Product

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Old 07-28-03, 07:14 AM
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Fresh Air Heat Exchanger Product

Hoyme Manufacturing Inc. in Alberta, Canada (www.hoyme.com) makes a motorless air exchanger for fresh air intake into a forced air heating system of a home. Does anyone have one installed or does anyone know anything about them (Pros and or Cons)?
 
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Old 07-30-03, 06:06 PM
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I am not familiar with this unit and would have some questions of my own.
The reason that most hrv's have fans is because the heat exchangers use a fairly restrictive air path that just bleeding air from the ductwork wouldn't give a very high flow rate.
This would lead me to believe that this thing is not near as efficient as a traditional hrv.

Typical hrv's in cold climates will accumulate frost because the low temp of the incoming air freezes the moisure in the out going air. There doesn't appear to be any defrost system to take care of this.

It really looks kind of Mickey Mouse. By looking at the picture it appears it uses a double wall chimney as the inlet and outlet.
In your climate there would likely be a big ball of frost at the outside vent as soon as November weather hit.
How much does this thing cost and is it approved?

<img src="http://www.hoyme.com/images/airless.jpg">
 
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Old 07-30-03, 08:11 PM
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Thanks for your input. Great advise. I was only looking into this because I want a way to get fresh air into the house during the cold winters in Canada. I don't want to manually keep opening windows each day. The regular Heat Exchangers don't look like they will work in my furnace ductwork because it only has a one speed fan motor and I don't want to keep it running on high continuously. I was hoping that maybe this motorless exchanger might be a possible answer. Your sound advise indicates to me that this is not the way to go. Thanks again. If you have any suggestions, I would be eager to hear.
 
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Old 07-30-03, 09:14 PM
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Hey Chip,

The regular Heat Exchangers don't look like they will work in my furnace ductwork because it only has a one speed fan motor and I don't want to keep it running on high continuously.
A regular HRV should be able to work in any homes.. (Hot water, Forced air.. New system, old system......)

This is from April Aire FAQ.
5. Is a special type of heating or cooling system necessary in order to use an ERV?
No, an ERV can be utilized with any forced air system equipped with a blower and duct system. It can also be used with non-forced air systems as an independent system.


You don't need to run your fan year round in the furnace. Also I've seen in some homes that has hot water heat, they had a vent in the main hall way to "Pull" out the stail air, and a couple of vents eles where "bringing" in fresh air...

also, April Aire just came out with a new vent system for who can't afford HRV system..
 
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Old 07-31-03, 08:39 AM
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Jay and or GregH,

Thanks for your imput. Questions for you or any other viewers:

1. Can I use a traditional HRV in my forced air furnace ductwork so that the fresh air is coming into the cold air plenum just before the furnace and installing a separate exhaust return duct to the HRV from another part of the house independent of the existing forced air ductwork?

2. Will the fans on the HRV intake and exit ports of the unit still distribute a fresh air flow to the house by pushing fresh air past the furnace filter and then furnace blower motor even when it isn't running itself?

3. Will there be an increased frost problem if the HRV where running as set up in question 2 as opposed to with the furnace blower running continually? Chips
 
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Old 07-31-03, 12:52 PM
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Yes you can exhaust through a grill mounted in the living space and push fresh air into the furnace.
It would be preferrable to have the air exchanger interlocked with the furnace fan motor to avoid dumping in cold air.
 
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Old 07-31-03, 05:07 PM
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GregH

Thanks for your response. This leads me to ask a new question:

Could I hook the HRV into my existing forced air system so that it only opperated when my furnace fan ran? I figure that the HRV wouldn't be as efficient this way, but I want to introduce fresh air into my house during the winter heating and summer cooling that my present forced air system is providing. I know that it is ideal to have the furnace motor run continually, but this isn't an option to me, as explained earlier. Appreciate any advice!
 
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Old 07-31-03, 06:32 PM
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Yes, that is what I meant by having the hrv interlocked with the furnace fan.
This means that the hrv only runs when the furnace fan runs.

There is nothing wrong with running the fan almost continuosly on high speed.
You could shut it off at night when going to bed and run it throughout the day.
 
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Old 07-31-03, 11:01 PM
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GregH
My only concern with running the furnace fan continously at high speed with the HRV is that the house might feel drafty. Your thought on this would be appreciated.
 
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Old 08-01-03, 08:39 AM
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http://search.nrel.gov/query.html?co...&ct=1790629555 This is a US goverment website that list 160 websites, many of them have data on research for Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRV) aka Air to Air Exchangers. The introduction of this technology is a direct result of improved building methods, which resulted in issues like Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) and Sick Building Syndrome (SBS). These issues are complex to say the least where there are several levels of concern and each level is multi-faceted. The issues cover minor health ailments to the occupants to structual collapse. For the average person the data is of no practical use. For the professional it provides guidelines. In the United States it is ASHRAE Minimum Ventilation Guide. I do believe Canada has a similar organization and guidelines for the evaluation and determination of the practical application of such technology.

Being involved in an industry that has been blamed for many of these issues, I actually evaluate and determine the need for HRV's in residential construction based on ASHREA guidelines. This includes new construction and remodelling (retrofitting) homes which requires the measurement and verification.

The minimum ventilation guide for a residential home in either the US or Canada is .35 air exchange per hour. Even at this rate, one of the contributing factors for the determination are the habits of the occupants. Without knowing anything about your home I can safely say your air exchange is around 1, which is almost 3 times greater than the minimum. And you sound like a reasonably intelligent person, so your habits would probably be evaluated above normal. This is not actualy designed to discourage you from seeking such technology for application in your home but rather for you to put it in perspective.

For example, the maintenance of the systems inside the home such as heating/cooling, water heating, plumbing, etc. play an important factor on proper operation which can affect IAQ and in most instances it does. The introduction of a HRV does not in any way reduce or eliminate the need for maintenance of those systems. In fact, the improved maintenance of these system will probably increase your comfort, reduce your energy bills more so than the HRV which would probably be less expensive than the cost of the HRV.

In my opinion learning more about how the systems that presently exist in your home will do more for you in accomplishing what you desire than a HRV will ever do. Knowing what to look for, how it works, what to avoid, when to do it and what to do with these systems are extremely beneficial to you and your family. Besides this forum, others like the Plumbing and Electrical can be valuable sources of information and I can assure you the Moderators and others who reply to your posts are more than willing and able to assist you in such an endeavor.
 
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