reiker ceiling fan heater


  #1  
Old 12-23-03, 12:05 PM
Keen
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reiker ceiling fan heater

Does anyone have experience with the Reiker ceiling fan/room heater? I saw them on the web, but am wondering if they really heat a room well. Are they noisy to operate?

It seems like a fairly simple way to heat the two bedrooms upstairs that have no heat ducts, but before I shell out the money, I'd like to know if others have tried them.

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 12-24-03, 03:31 PM
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where did you get the info, sounds interesting, but i cannot find anything on them...
thanks

mike
 
  #3  
Old 12-26-03, 06:06 AM
Keen
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web sites

Hello,

Here are some links:

http://www.buyreiker.com

http://www.refreshhome.com/rerococefan.html

http://www.right-tool.com/reikrrroomco.html

They cost over $300 each, much more than a baseboard heater would cost. But the idea that it could be installed so simply where the overhead light is now and with a remote thermostat makes considerable savings in installation. I do not enjoy snaking wires through walls.

Thanks for your input.

Catherine
 
  #4  
Old 12-26-03, 07:22 AM
T
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One possible problem with this is the electrical. If it truly does heat the air it must use an electric heater. No normal fan motor will generate enough heat to heat a room. If the circuit on which the fan is installed is already loaded the new "fan" may cause the circuit to be overloaded. I couldn't find anywhere on what the electrical requirements are (othe than the 'standard" 3 wire connection).
 
  #5  
Old 12-26-03, 08:23 AM
Keen
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That is a good observation. I plan to run a dedicated heater circuit to whatever heater I install in the bedrooms. It is just easier to run a new line to the existing ceiling box in our unfinished attic, than to try to get one to the baseboard under the window.

Given that, what do you think?
 
  #6  
Old 12-26-03, 12:04 PM
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I still prefer a standard baseboard heater with a wall thermostat (no heater mounted thermostat, you really don' t get any control that way). Much cheaper, less likely to break down and easier to replace. Add a fan to circulate the air. I'm also not very sure on how much heat this fan actually gives sinze it uses 110V. Since most lighting circuits are 15A even a dedicated circuit will only be able to supply 1650W. At 80% derating (code) it's about 1300W. And this is a dedicated circuit, which means the heater is at most 750W (if not smaller since room seems to be quite small).

If you have very modest heat requirements this may be a good idea. If you actually depend on it for heat I would go for baseboads. A 20A, 220V circuit will give you 3500W of available heat that you know will work (kind of slow unfortunately). With the money saved you can buy a nice ceiling fan with a remote control.
 
  #7  
Old 12-27-03, 06:25 AM
Keen
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Thanks for the advice. Actually the bedrooms are upstairs over heated rooms, so I just need supplemental heat. I plan to use 110V, even if I use baseboard heaters. (I am running out of circuits available at the box.) I was going to buy maybe a 1000 watt heater. Right now we are using portable heaters that have that level of heat and they keep the rooms warm.

You are right--the baseboard heaters can be bought for around $50. They are also quiet, which is important in a bedroom. And I am not willing to pay $300 for something I'm not sure will work.

I was just hoping that I could come up with a ceiling heater that I could more easily install in the attic above, so I did a search for ceiling heaters. The other ceiling heaters I found seemed like they would be pretty noisy when running.

The only disadvantages of the baseboard heaters are the difficulty of the install, especially with the remote thermostat you suggest, and the fact that they limit the arrangement of furniture. How critical is it to place the baseboard heater on the outside wall under a window? In my daughter's room, there is a wall that has an attic next to it. I could much more easily put a baseboard heater on that wall.
 
  #8  
Old 12-27-03, 01:48 PM
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The only difference between running a heater at 220V instead of 110V is the double pole breaker instead of the single pole. The wiring is the same. I personally run all heater at 220V, that way can put more then 1 heater on a circuit. A 20A, 220V circuit will allow you to put 3 1000W heaters on it. A 20A 110V circuit will allow you to put only 1 1000W heater.
You may be able to use "skinny" breakers (to make some room in your panel. You will need to use a regular double pole breaker for the 220V line.
 
  #9  
Old 12-27-03, 03:19 PM
Keen
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Wonderful. I can have more heaters just using the two spaces in the box. Thanks for the advice. There is an unheated box room upstairs also. I can heat all three rooms on one 220V circuit with 1000 watt heaters!

For the electrical work at the box, I hire my neighbor who is a licensed electrician. I will probably be the one pulling wires through the walls however.
 
 

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