EPA Certification


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Old 12-27-03, 10:13 PM
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EPA Certification

A question for all you A/C experts.

Is EPA certification required for simply connecting up a manifold guage set to measure refrigerant pressure on R12 and R22 systems. My understanding is that no certification is required for R134a.
 
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Old 12-28-03, 06:25 AM
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For automotive "MVAC" it's not required w/134A. With for "HVACR " it is required. Kinda goofy huh?

They sell complete retrofit and charge kits at automotive parts stores and even Wally-World to anyone who wishes to buy it. But if I need it for a refrigeration application at Jim-Bobs drive-thru I need my certification.
 
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Old 12-28-03, 11:11 AM
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Lightbulb EPA

Like Matt said anyone can mess around w/134A. But for R12-R22 and like the new R410A You have to have a EPA certification. ED
 
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Old 12-28-03, 07:34 PM
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Sorry - not too clear about what the terms "MVAC" and "HVACR" stand for.

So what you guys are basically saying is that no certification is required to work on any R134a system and all work can be done such as evacuation, recharging etc on any system using R134a such as cars, refrigerators etc.

On the other hand working with R12/R22 for any system (home, car) etc does require certification even to simply hook up gauges to read pressure.

Is my understanding correct?
 
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Old 12-29-03, 07:59 AM
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MVAC = motor vehicle air conditioning.. If you're working strictly with 134A you don't need the certification.

HVACR = heating ventilation a/c & refrigeration..I've been universal since day one when they began this...but I believe even if it's 134a if it's anything other than a motor vehicle you have to be certified. I may be wrong though.
 
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Old 12-29-03, 05:52 PM
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on that subject

do we need to recertify or take a new test for 410A? i never have, although i service them all the time and have 2 here at home.
that diy conversion kit kills me...replacing 12 with 134, what is the average diy guy gonna do with the remaining R12 that is in the system??

VENT IT !!!!!!!

AAARRRRGGGGHHHHH!!!!
 
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Old 12-29-03, 11:57 PM
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I'm a bit puzzled by this whole thing. I thought the purpose of the certification was to make people aware of the environmental implications of refrigerants and the damage they cause to the ozone layer etc. From this point of view I can see why they may want to regulate how R12 & R22 are used.

But in the case of R134a if this is environmetally friendly why is it OK for anyone to work on a car but needs a certificate to work on a refrigerator for example.

I presume this R410a should also be environmetally friendly. If this is the case why is certification required.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 04:16 PM
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This thread contains all good questions.

You can go to http://www.epatest.com/ and read up if you like.

Currently R-134 can be purchased and used by everyone to repair automotive applications. You need a license 609 to purchase refrigerant in qualities above 1lb containers.

When it comes to stationary appliances the rules change. You need a 608 license to service equipment. They have a type I license for units that contain less than 5lbs of refrigerant. It can be any refrigerant R12, R22, R134, R410a, etc. They have a type II for equipment over 5lbs. Type III for chillers. Most people get the universal license and the 609 so thay can work on anything.

As for more environmental friendly? It's a trade off, Ozone vs the greenhouse effect.

If you have "pure" (did not top off with 134 or propane) R12 left in the system, any A/C shop with evacuate it for a small fee or free since it is worth money.
 
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Old 01-01-04, 07:27 PM
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Thanks for the link. Plenty of useful info. However, it does not answer the why's in my post but I guess the only people who know the answers are the people who made the rules.
 
 

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