basement heating options

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Old 04-12-04, 11:25 AM
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options for heating a basement

We have a plan to finish about 600 sq. ft. in our basement for recreational purposes. (The remaining areas will be unfinished storage/workshop). The finished area will be framed with a vapor barrier, and insulated to code, R-13 in Virginia. The entire basement has six hot-air registers, but no cold-air returns. One contractor said that I will be plenty cozy without additional heat. Another contractor disagreed with that.

What are my options for heating the basement? I have a propane line that I could extend for a ventless propane stove. I have also read about various electric heaters built into walls and radiant heat pads placed under the carpeting.

I want to integrate the choice with my plan before work begins.

Thank you!
 
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Old 04-12-04, 11:52 AM
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You should not have a problem running a couple of those supply's to the finished space and I would also run a return from the finished space.

Stay away from the ventless heaters. They are illegal in many states.
 
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Old 04-12-04, 11:59 AM
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Hello: Barry

Many choices and options exist. However, you should NOT install a retrun air vent back to the furnace, if the furnace is located in the same basement, regardless of where in the basement.

The intake will draw products of combustion from the furnace out of the furnace, producing carbon monoxides. Regardless of any freah air venting anywhere in the basement, etc.

Safety must be adhered to at all times not to create any form of recirculation of air(s) which can draw air from the furnace or the area it is located in.

If the furnace is not in the basement anywhere, a fresh air return may be fine to add and or many not even be needed.

Good idea to check with the local city and building and safety departments in your area. Work done must meet codes to insure safety and proper operation of any gas fuel burning appliance.
 
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Old 04-12-04, 01:10 PM
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Six register outlets for heat in the basement should be more than enough .Dont even think about the Ventfree or also called the Ventless heater, outlawed in many states

ED
 
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Old 04-13-04, 10:53 AM
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Returns are put in basements all the time. It's no differant than a gas fired furnace in a closet on the main floor that pulls return from the living space around it.
 
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Old 04-13-04, 01:08 PM
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thanks for feedback

Thanks for the feedback!

I was hoping six hot-air registers would be sufficient once the finished areas are insulated.

I will check with the local codes, but I agree that adding a cold-air return in the finished space should be code compliant because the furnace is in a different room in the basement, and the furnace itself is vented outside. The additional return should make the air flow more efficient? What do you think?

Thanks again
 
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Old 04-13-04, 01:16 PM
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When the furnace has its own make up air for sure put a return down there. Keep it down near the floor if you can

ED
 
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Old 04-14-04, 05:58 AM
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I am with Ed, Put the return down near the floor to pull off the cold air in the winter.
 
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Old 04-14-04, 07:45 AM
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Hello: Barry

So long as you agree the completed project should be code compliant, all should be well.

The code requires that air exposed to combustion and fumes is not to be mixed with air in the living space. Thus, a return air anywhere in the basement, where the furnace is, is a potential or has the potiental to or for combinding what is termed breathable air with air exposed to combustion.

In the case of a furnace being inside the upper living area space in a closet, say in a hallway, with a return in the same area, usually beneath the closet, the closet door must be closed and usually is, to avoid recirculation and mixing of beathable air and air exposed to combustion and fumes.

Breathable air is on the outside of the door in the living sapce while non breathable air, which is exposed to products of combustion, is on the back side inside of the door inside the closet.

In that condition and manner, the cobustion air is taken, usually from an attic space or may be taken from outside via fresh outside intake ducts, etc.

Thus the two air systems. Closet door closed, unless unit being serviced, avoids mixing of the airs and the potential for carbon monoixdes being producing by alerting the air flows.

The negetive (vacuum) pressures produced by the air suction of the blower alters the design flow of air in the firebox. Such happens, CO can be produced.
 
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