wood heater and duct work


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Old 02-01-05, 05:26 AM
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wood heater and duct work

I have a gas furnace and central air in my house and a wood heater in the basement for back up in case of really cold weather or power outage. my duct work is laid out in a "T" configuration with the furnace at the bottom of the T and the wood heater is at the end of the "cross piece" I was wondering if it is feasible to build duct work around the wood heater and connect to the overhead duct work to help put the heat upstairs. I guess my biggest question is if i do this and say at night the furnace turns on what can be done to stop air from blowing out around the wood heater?
Has anyone done this before?
Thanks for your input.
 
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Old 02-01-05, 09:05 AM
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Is this a free standing wood stove?

Nothing you can really do for your set up if it just a free standing wood stove.

However, if your wood stove is a wood furance that has blower(s) and hook up for duct work, then yes you can tie it at the end of the run.

Do you have an open stair way from the room this stove is in? What room is righ above it?

Heat rises. so if you have an open stair way, the heat will go up. If you have a room that you won't mind cutting in floor grates above the stove for the heat to come up in.
 
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Old 02-01-05, 09:25 AM
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Wink

I would think more like put a over size register that you can open and close there in the cold air return to the furnace. Turn the furnace blower on and open that so it can take the heat from down there and run it through the furnace filter adnon up stairs. Or like jay said just let it warm the floors and basement that will help a lot . with out all teh dust getting up stairs.

ED
 
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Old 02-01-05, 10:11 AM
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it is a free standing wood heater. my basement ceiling is insulated so that hinders the heat rising. The way the stairway is made the air has to make about 4 90 deg. turns to get into the house (stair way goes into laundry room plus stairway is blocked in)
what i am thinking would work with the exception of the fan turning coming on that is on the furnace then blowing back into the basement. oh well not all ideas are good ones...
Thanks guys.
 
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Old 02-01-05, 05:03 PM
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oneshotman,

I have seen all manner of contraptions to capture heat from a wood stove.

The one thing you must give serious consideration is that a wood stove is not approved to be connected to ductwork.
The problem is that the interpretation of "connected" that insurance companies have, is different from you and I.
The closer you come to a wood stove with any kind of ductwork, the more likelyhood your insurance policy will be voided.

The problem with having a return air duct near the stove is that in a housefire the air movement would cause the fire to spread quicker.
A wood furnace that is meant to be connected to ductwork has built in safeguards to prevent fires and more importantly a UL, ULC, CSA, Warnock Hersey or similar approval for this use.
 
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Old 02-03-05, 05:51 AM
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Greg,
thanks for your insight and i dont doubt a thing you said but it doesnt make sense. any opening into the duct work for a wood heater would be no worse than the opening for the return for the central air. seems it would only be a problem if the fire was in the basement and went into the duct at the wood heater. there is a whole lot more metal between the wood fire and the air passing by than there is in the gas furnace between the flame and the air. but one cannot understand peoples thinking that is smarter than I.
thanks.
 
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Old 02-03-05, 06:12 AM
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oneshotman wrote:
"seems it would only be a problem if the fire was in the basement and went into the duct at the wood heater"

This is exactly what I was referring to.
If you had a fire that was caused by a defective toaster on your kitchen counter, you likely would not have a problem with anything you did with your ductwork.
If however the fire was in the basement, anywhere near the stove, you could have problems.
The difference between the example of the gas flame in a furnace and what you are trying to build is that the gas furnace has been designed with safeties that allow it to have some agencie's approval, which keeps your insurance in force.
If you wanted to use your ducts to carry heat from a wood burner it would have to be with a wood burner that is approved and hooked up according to the mfr's instructions.

But hey, many of people do it and don't have fires.
Just giving you my perspective.
 
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Old 02-03-05, 07:39 AM
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i see what you are saying, i use to be vol. fireman and have seen plenty of stupid stuff. the only thing combustiable to the wood heater is the floor joist above it. If anything i go way over board for safetys sake. there ought to be way to get the heat upstairs.... oh well such is life i guess.
thanks.
 
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Old 11-15-12, 04:05 PM
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wood heater

im thinking of doing something along those lines but im thinking of having my wood burner out side and making a sealed hot box for the air to be heated.so the stove is only heating the return duct and never entering the system. i never liked the idea of having my system open due to contaminates.i have a basement as well so building a concrete building around my stove would be easy and there is already a hole in the side of the house where i swapped from a single unit to split.i thought about a L shaped hot box 16"x 72" x 48.what do y'all think?
 
 

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