Reliable Furnace needed

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Old 03-04-05, 10:16 AM
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Reliable Furnace needed

I am looking into getting a new gas furnace, the existing one is over 30 years old and inefficient, but it has been very reliable.
I have been reading the posts on this forum for some time, also other forums which have to do with furnaces; there are quite a few which report on problems with fairly new furnaces. With all the accumulated experience of the moderators and other experts, would it be proper to ask which brand of furnace I should stay away from and which are recommended?
 
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Old 03-04-05, 11:16 AM
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Stay away from *********** no brand bashing allowed************. Stick with your old furnace and you will be much happier in the end.

Reliable is efficient...

If I were to recommend a new furnace, I would go with a Rheem.
 

Last edited by KField; 03-04-05 at 11:52 AM. Reason: brand bashing
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Old 03-04-05, 12:52 PM
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Red face

Just Furnace-not AC as well? Recommend Trane/Am Standard,Carrier/Bryant, Armstrong, Rheem. Please insist on written Manual J heat/cool load calculation for properly sizing equipment. Also, take a look at your existing ductwork and insulation. New equipment with poor ductwork is throwing $$$ away. If AC to be added or replaced at a later date, then this needs to be taken into consideration. Make certain your dealer has a full understanding of any existing issues with your old equipment,your expectations for the new equipment, and what is covered on standard warranty and available on extended warranty. Your final selection of equipment may hinge on how long you expect to be living in this house.

See article below on "Best Rated Gas Furnaces"
http://www.consumersearch.com/www/ho...fullstory.html

I would insist on 90+ AFUE condensing furnaces. I know there are varying opinions on variable speed but I do believe they contribute to better efficiency, less noise, more even temperature and comfort, and better air quality if equipped with high efficient filter media cabinet. Check with authorized dealers and your utility for available rebates or special utility rates.
Good Luck!
 
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Old 03-04-05, 03:11 PM
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That article is misleading at best. "Trane is one of the least repair-prone furnace brands." Trane released a whole series of high efficient furnaces that have major problems with locking out. The computer boards are misreading a vent problem and a polarity problem which causes them to lockout and the customer to have no heat. This problem should almost be cleared up by now, and they said it only effect some 3000 furnaces but I know we had a pretty serious amount of call backs regarding this model.

I don't understand, if you want reasoning for me to give negative recommendations of certain brands I will give it. I am not "bashing", merely attempting to what is best for home owners by telling them the truth. No wonder nobody trusts our industry, we are too afraid and busy covering up the truth with no time for solving this major credibility problem.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 03:17 PM
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If you go with a 90%+ efficient furnace be aware that the air quality in your home is going to deteriorate. The moisture levels are going to increase substantially and unless you install equipment to deal with the excess moisture I would not recommend a condensing furnace. If your house is old, has many cracks in the windows and doors then a 90+ furnace won't save you much money anyway. If your house is well sealed and you insist on a high efficient furnace then install a heat recovery ventilator as well to control the moisture and stagnant air.
 
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Old 03-04-05, 03:26 PM
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Question Captain

Originally Posted by LoveBoatCaptain
If you go with a 90%+ efficient furnace be aware that the air quality in your home is going to deteriorate. The moisture levels are going to increase substantially and unless you install equipment to deal with the excess moisture I would not recommend a condensing furnace
Why is the indoor air quality going to dereriorate? Where is extra moisture going to come from?
 
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Old 03-04-05, 03:45 PM
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It isn't extra moisture, old furnaces force(draft in chimney or vent fan) multiple air recycles per day which would bring fresh air from outside through different openings in the home to satisfy combustion and dilution air. High efficient furnaces do not require any combustion or dillution air from within the home, therefore there is no air exchange occuring with the outside air. All that air that was once changed out several times a day now sits and stagnates. The effect is rather impressive if the home owners are not used to using range hoods and bathroom fans to exhaust.
 
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