Installing NG heater in garage

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Old 02-12-06, 05:27 PM
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Installing NG heater in garage

Hello,
I bought a Natural Gas heater by DESA http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...lance&n=228013
I would like to install it in my garage. I have a NG furnace for my house and was thinking about installing this heater a few feet away from the furnace. My only question is on the tapping of the gas line. Is it kosher for me to just T the gas line before the valve on the gas line that feeds the furnace and use that with another valve to feed the heater?

Thanks,
Tren
 
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Old 02-12-06, 06:45 PM
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Your ability to connect another appliance will depend on many factors like whether or not the line that supplies your furnace is large enough to fed the extra heater.
Another issue is whether it is permitted by either code or insurance regulations to have a combustion type heater in your garage.
Here an heater that has any type of open combustion must be mounted five feet or higher from the floor.
Another thing to check is whether or not the vent-free heater you bought is permitted to be used in your jurisdiction.
They are banned in all of Canada and several US states.
They are potentially dangerous in that they spill the products of combustion directly into the heated space.
They also emit a graet deal of water vapor as another product of combustion and can potentially cause moisture and mold problems.
These heaters are normally approved as a temporary heat source and should not be run continuously.
 
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Old 02-12-06, 06:48 PM
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So I need to...
Check local codes for:
Combustion heater in garage to make sure it is ok in my area.
I dont plan on using it any time other than winter, and only for a few hours a day at most while I am out in the garage.

Anything else?
Thanks,
Tren
 
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Old 02-12-06, 07:14 PM
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You will need to check codes and you will also need to have a licensed gas fitter either do the piping or take out a permit for you.
You don't say where you are but if in a cold climate one thing you need to watch is that the moisture given off by these heaters will condense on any cold material.
It seems moisture likes tools more that we do and you will have to do something about protecting them from rust.

Sorry to be down on these heaters but they are a sore spot for a lot of people.
I know of someone getting sick from one and used a "sunflower" heater a short while myself and damaged an engine sitting in pieces under a cover on my bench.
Just do a search with a term like "ventless heater safety" and you will find what I'm talking about.
Just watch and you will find that the only positive comments are from the sellers and mfr's of these things.
 
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Old 11-14-08, 08:59 AM
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I have a similar setup. I have a detached workshop and I ran a natural gas line to it this summer and installed a vent-free natural gas heater. I had permits and all the work has been inspected and the heater works well.

My worry is that I am putting a lot of moisture into the garage and I want to knwo if there are any solutions to this? I haven't had any problems yet (Except for the first day I turned it on, that fogged up the windows) I keep it set really low out there (40s) until I go out there to work, then I'll crank it up to warm the place up quickly.

Should I just leave a dehumidifier out there and empty it every couple days? Is there a way to build a cheap heat exchange unit so I can get fresh air from outside without loosing all my heat?
 
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Old 11-14-08, 03:18 PM
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Ya, aside from the products of combustion in your space moisture is a problem and there really is no practical solution.

Dehumidifiers only work at normal room temperatures and if you exhaust enough air to reduce the humidity you will go through an excessive amount of fuel.
You will find in a very short amount of time a coating of rust on everything in there.

Only option is to replace the heater with a vented type or use an electric heater.
 
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