New Thermostat verus old thermostat


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Old 04-06-06, 03:29 PM
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New Thermostat verus old thermostat

My old thermostat when set to 68, for heating, would come on at 67 and turn off around 69 - 79. My new thermostat with a new furnace, 93%, comes on at 68, set at 68, and goes off at 68. Is this normal for the new thermostat to stay constant temp? If I put the old one back on, would I not be saving gas and wear and tear on my new furnace if it runs the same as when it was on my old furnace?
 
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Old 04-06-06, 05:44 PM
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JoeT

It kind of comes down to comfort or economy. A wider temperature swing will be more economical but you won't be as comfortable. Economy & comfort is where variable speed, two stage furnaces really shine. I'm wating for someone to come out with a true modulating furnace similar to the modulating boilers.
 
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Old 04-06-06, 07:14 PM
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What Brand/Model of t-stat do you have?

On the Honywell lines, you can set CPH (Cycles per hour) to provide comfort.

Other brands has temp swing like you've mention about on your old t-stat.

The tight temp is good for comfort, our body can feel 2 degree temp swing.

Grady,

Rheem and York has a Modulating furnace. (13 stages)
 
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Old 04-07-06, 04:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Jay11J
What Brand/Model of t-stat do you have?

On the Honywell lines, you can set CPH (Cycles per hour) to provide comfort.

Other brands has temp swing like you've mention about on your old t-stat.

The tight temp is good for comfort, our body can feel 2 degree temp swing.

Grady,

Rheem and York has a Modulating furnace. (13 stages)
Its a Honeywell Electronic Programmable Thermostat, 4 settings for Mon thru Fri and two settings for Sat and Sun. Does both heating and cooling. Cannot find a model number on manual or Thermostat. Find nothing on setting CPH as you call it. UPS code is 69-0862-3. Next time I go to Menards will have to look as I believe they sell the same thing there.

Anyplace I could find model number on thermostat?
 
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Old 04-07-06, 05:57 AM
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The model # should be on back of the t-stat it self when you remove it from the sub base.

The chaper end of the HOnywell will have switch or screws on the back.

I don't think Mendards carries the Honywell lines.. Just Home Depot.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 03:08 PM
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13 Stages?

That sounds scary, especially with York. Reminds me of their wonderous Triathlon heat pump. Do you, by any chance, have a link to either one?
 
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Old 04-07-06, 08:13 PM
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I'll e mail it to you Grady.

Rheem has been using it for 5+ years, and been going well. York just came out with it.
 
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Old 04-07-06, 10:39 PM
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C'mon Jay, post a link here so we can all see this 13 stage furnace. I would REALLY like to see a 13 stage gas-fired unit for residential use.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 01:58 AM
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Personally, I am not impressed with the modulating furnaces. Or even 2- stage furnaces for that matter.

All they are doing is underfiring the furnace. That means a colder flame temp and a longer run time. That means it cost a lot more money for you to heat your home.

As far as comfort goes, I am more comfortable with warmer air coming out of those registers.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 07:19 AM
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Operating cost

Most 2 stage furnaces are more efficient on low fire than high. The cooler flame is matched with a lower fan speed to keep the temperature rise within spec. It is a fact that if you had a furnace which exactly matched the heat loss of the structure at any given time this system would run constantly & provide a constant temperature & be as efficient as you could get.
 
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Old 04-08-06, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by furd
C'mon Jay, post a link here so we can all see this 13 stage furnace. I would REALLY like to see a 13 stage gas-fired unit for residential use.

Allright, here ya go!

York's

and

Rheem's


BigD,

Grady made the right point. I'll add my point on it....

2-stage and Modualting been around awhile, and there has been no trouble with it.

The ideal behind this is COMFORT. Yes, it may cost a little more to run, but People are willing to pay for comfort.

I have a two stage Trane and a couple family members as well and been VERY happy with it. They said the comfort is there, and both my uncle and I have older homes, and before the two stage, temp in the home was never even from one area to to another, Now with two stage, it's with in 2 degrees.

Also, what I like most about is it's QUIET running on low stage..
 

Last edited by Jay11J; 04-08-06 at 07:54 AM.
 

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