natural gas burning fireplace

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  #1  
Old 10-27-06, 01:11 PM
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natural gas burning fireplace

I have a room that gets heated by electricity and I would like to change that because of costs and appearance. It has a fireplace in it but is only meant for wood burning. I would like to retrofit the fireplace to run off of natural gas if I could. I don't know if this is possible or safe etc. The firplace has its normal chimney stack and has a damper on it. I would also like it to be controlled by a thermostat. What do you think. Thanks
 
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Old 10-27-06, 03:49 PM
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Id say forget it. When you open the damper you will pull more heat out of the room , So it will cost you more to try and get the room warm.

ED
 
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Old 10-27-06, 04:44 PM
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You are better off getting a sealed insert gas fireplace like Heat-n-Glo and they can be controled by t-stat,, or remote with built in t-stat. These unit are best to be installed by a pro.
 
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Old 10-27-06, 06:15 PM
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Part of the question was whether or not I would even have to open the damper. This is a big room and alot of those natural gas heaters are made nonvent. I put in a garage heater that uses natural gas. That one was a nonvent and had a built in t-stat. if I cannot retrofit it in the existing one there probably isn't a point in doing it cause the fireplace that is in the wall right know wasn't built cheap so it looks nice and it would look funky if I put in another fireplace in the room. The fireplace that is in there right know has a blower on the bottom of it with a grill to conceal it and over this is the wood burning fireplace and it looks like it was placed in first so the fireplace was installed and then they layed the masonry and slate around it. Moreove when I stick my head in the fireplace and look at how the stack or whatever they call it the throat, mantel, smoke chamber etc. connects to the fireplace it looks like it is one piece and is made of very thick metal. I don't see how one could move it out without ripping into the fireplace surround. What are my options? Mayby I should just use the electrical ones. thanks
 

Last edited by Michaela521; 10-27-06 at 06:49 PM.
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Old 10-27-06, 06:23 PM
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Please stay clear of those ventless fireplace! They are nothing but trouble and too many death caused by CO on these units.

Go either a direct-vent fireplace or electric.
 
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Old 10-28-06, 12:33 PM
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I have one in my garage. What is your opinion about that, safetywize. Thanks
 

Last edited by Michaela521; 10-28-06 at 12:47 PM.
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Old 10-28-06, 04:02 PM
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Garage is not a living space and you are not sleeping out there as well. Most likely the door is open close enough to allow air exchange.

My uncle had one in his workshop, he end up taking it out due to moistier build on his windows, and doors. he was getting headache, and I told him that a sign of CO. he got rid of the next day and had those fan forced hanging unit installed.
 
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Old 10-28-06, 04:37 PM
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Michaela521
In many states now they cant sell the ventless gas heaters. Dont that tell you something. That saftey switch they talk about read it it will turn the the unit off when low on oxygen. But you can be dead by then from the CO.

ED
 
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Old 10-31-06, 12:08 AM
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I have a similair situation with a nonvent in a workshop. Reading this you gyes got me worried and thinking about it so I decide to get a co detector to make sure all is ok. I got this one here http://www.hechinger.com/web/catalog/product_detail1.aspx?pid=91432&cm_ven=Froogle&cm_cat=Building-Remodeling&cm_pla=Kidde&cm_ite=Kidde-Home%20Safety-91432&cid=E699CF76249E6C62D564DEBF6274A184

If the co detector tells me something is wrong I can always install one of those heat exchanges with a fan on it to bring in good air and dump out the bad. I think that would be the best thing to do if I find something is wrong. I do spend alot of time in that work shop though. Thanks
 

Last edited by robj; 10-31-06 at 12:21 AM.
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Old 10-31-06, 05:46 AM
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you could use the air to air exchanger, but in the long run you are better off to just take out the ventless heater, and put in a vented heater fan in.

But yeah, you are doing the right thing getting a CO detector.
 
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Old 10-31-06, 11:40 AM
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[QUOTE=Jay11J]you could use the air to air exchanger, but in the long run you are better off to just take out the ventless heater, and put in a vented heater fan in. [QUOTE]

Why?
 
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Old 10-31-06, 01:13 PM
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Those air exchanger are pretty expensive.. Avg about $1,500 to $2,500.

Where the heater can be about $400 to $800.

Also, lots of dust from the shop may be hard on the air exchanger.
 
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Old 10-31-06, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Jay11J
Also, lots of dust from the shop may be hard on the air exchanger.

That is the reason why I wanted it. I was thinking about hitting two birds with one stone. My thinking was that it would help with the saw dust etc. that is emitted and also bring in fresh air that is usually conditioned with a filter as well, might be overkill for a shop though but like I said I spend a good amount of time in there. I might want to check with the manufacturer first to see if it can handle being installed in a shop like you point out. I think I saw some that are cheaper than that though. Thanks.
 
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Old 11-01-06, 10:49 AM
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robj

My thinking was that it would help with the saw dust etc.
Not only do you want to worry about teh CO here. But saw dust and spark or flame dont mix. If the right mix is in the air .It can all blow up on you.


ED
 
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