Oil Smell question


  #1  
Old 01-15-07, 05:42 PM
Bernard_01's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 247
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Oil Smell question

Greetings from N.H.
In our mobile home we have a Miller hot air furnace w/ Beckett burner. Everything has been working great since we moved in back in september. Now on about every other heating cycle, we smell the #1 heating oil (tank is outside the mobile home). The smell is getting our attention. We have a CO detector that reads zero. It is a good one (I paid $85). The last service tag to the heating system was done on 6/4/06. It reads 85.4 efficiency test. Where should I begin to investigate this odor? Could it be the filter in the Beckett Suntec pump? Any help is appreciated.
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-07, 07:58 PM
KField's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 3,245
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
If you smell kerosene, it doesn't have anything to do with combustion. An odor of unburned fuel is an indication of a fuel leak. You should be able to see it somewhere. CO is only a very minor possibility with an oil unit but the CO detectors are a good idea. Strange as this may sound, the CO tetector you paid $85 for is about $100 short of a good detector. If you get into researching it, you will see that a UL listed CO detector is not allowed to trigger an alarm until the CO levels are relatively high for a long time. That is just a little trivia for you.

I would not recommend doing any service on that furnace without knowing exactly what you are doing. It is a specialized unit for mobile homes and has some quirks that make it a little tricky to work on. If the smell persists and you cannot see any kero anywhere, I would recommend a service visit from your service company.

Ken
 
  #3  
Old 01-16-07, 07:20 AM
Bernard_01's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 247
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
HI again, maybe my description of my problem was not accurate enough. The "fumes" we are smelling eminate from the ductwork in the floor. The odor is that of when an airplane or jet engine fuel smell is present. I inspected all around the burner and fittings finding no indication of a leak. The T-stat and call for heat all works perfectly. Burner comes on normally followed by the blower unit. The smell is not present on each cycle, but rather every other cycle or there abouts. Here in New Hampshire it is finally getting colder, could the outside temperature have anything to do with this, since it wasn't happening with the more moderate temps? If I was experiencing a downdraft would downdraft have the odor of the fuel? My nose is pretty sensitive, maybe somebody else would not even notice it.
Thanks again.
 

Last edited by Bernard_01; 01-16-07 at 03:01 PM. Reason: more information to add
  #4  
Old 01-16-07, 05:36 PM
KField's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Easton, PA
Posts: 3,245
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The part of the heat exchanger on your unit is on the negative pressure side of the blower. There may be a gasket leaking or some other problem with the sealing of the heat exchanger. It would be best to have it checked.

Ken
 
  #5  
Old 01-16-07, 07:46 PM
Grady's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Delaware, The First State
Posts: 14,401
Received 38 Likes on 36 Posts
Fumes

One place often overlooked when looking for a leak is the underside of the burner. Use your hand or a white cloth or paper towel to wipe the underside of the burner. If you get any red on the cloth, you could have a leaking pump seal or fuel running back from the nozzle. Which model Miller do you have?
 
  #6  
Old 01-20-07, 07:41 PM
HVACGuy's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 134
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
I've had a few miller furnaces experience an after drip from the nozzle after shutdown. The reason is usually air in the nozzle assembly expanding from the heat and pushing fuel out. the fuel drips inside the hot blast tube and smokes. The miller is a downflow furnace that uses the front of the furnace as the return, so any smoke is transmitted by the ductwork.

The same result could be caused by a delayed ignition, due to a weak transformer, poor electrode setting, dirty nozzle, etc.

One point on the nozzle: The opening is tiny and easily clogged, so only burn Kero. Delavan makes a .579 MH nozzle that gives fantastic results in miller furnaces.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: