Wood burning heater leaves fine dust


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Old 01-24-07, 02:02 PM
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Wood burning heater leaves fine dust

We have a Lopi closed wood heater and after burning it for 3 or 4 days there's a fine ash dust around the house. Tried everything I can think of to stop this and nothing helps. I make sure a windward side window is cracked and other windows are closed. The chimney appears tight, and when adding wood, we open the door very carefully to keep the draft going in. We do run a bath exhaust heater once or twice a day, but as I said there's always a 1 or 2" window crack when the stove is burning. I close the intake damper as soon as the wood burns down or out. I'm aware of two other wood heaters that do the same thing. Any ideas how the dust is getting out of the unit?
 
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Old 01-24-07, 03:04 PM
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Wink

I make sure a windward side window is cracked and other windows are closed.

Ill bet it still comes in the window. That stove need air for the flue and you have to have it open.
 
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Old 01-24-07, 03:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Ed Imeduc View Post
I make sure a windward side window is cracked and other windows are closed.

Ill bet it still comes in the window. That stove need air for the flue and you have to have it open.
There is always a window open on the windward (pressure) side of the house, and the heater chimney is on the opposite side of the house. Looks like it would be hard for chimney smoke go upwind to the side of the house that has the open window. The room where the stove is located has a vaulted ceiling, so no attick that could accumulate and reroute smoke.
 
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Old 01-24-07, 04:36 PM
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Aren't Lopi stoves slow combustion and as they warm, the air flows back into the room without using a blower? When warm air moves out of stove, it may be carrying ash with it?

How often do you clean out ashes? When was the last time flue was cleaned? Creosote build up in flue or air tubes may be hindering air flow? Routine stove maintenance is important.

Does the flue go out the side of the house or through the roof? Are down drafts a possibility? Why are you cracking a window? Does stove not draw properly?

Too, burning well-seasoned wood will give higher burn rate and fewer particulate emissions. What kind of wood are you burning? When was it cut?
 
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Old 01-24-07, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole View Post
Aren't Lopi stoves slow combustion and as they warm, the air flows back into the room without using a blower? When warm air moves out of stove, it may be carrying ash with it?
The Lopi model I have is somewhat conventional. It intakes combustion air at the bottom via a dampered opening and is routed to internal injection points. Very hot burn. It incinerates wood to the point that nothing is left but a very fine ash. Because the ash is so fine much of it goes out the flue, but a tiny amount finds it's way into the house, and after about 3 days burning we notice the ash dust on dark tables. I usually run it with the damper full open which create a pretty strong draft up the flue. Air flow will reverse if windows are closed and a bath or kitchen vent fan is running.

How often do you clean out ashes? When was the last time flue was cleaned? Creosote build up in flue or air tubes may be hindering air flow? Routine stove maintenance is important.
The dusting problem has always been there since new, and I know of two others that do the same thing. I suspect it's a common problem with modern wood burners.

Does the flue go out the side of the house or through the roof? Are down drafts a possibility? Why are you cracking a window? Does stove not draw properly?
Through a vaulted ceiling (no attic) out to a roof that is usually on the down wind side. This should make it draw better than if the flue exited on the weather side of a roof incline. I crack a window on the weather side of the house to make sure there is no resistence to the stove air intake. The house is pretty tight and the stove intake air has to come from somewhere.

[/QUOTE]Too, burning well-seasoned wood will give higher burn rate and fewer particulate emissions. What kind of wood are you burning? When was it cut?[/QUOTE]
Seasoned oak most of the time, cut over a year back.
 
 

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