How to bleed a fuel pump


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Old 02-02-07, 03:08 PM
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How to bleed a fuel pump

I have been searching this site for an hour!

I read plenty of threads regarding bleeding the fuel pump, but no one gives directions!

I replaced the filter on my fuel oil tank because the furnace kept quitting. Now, it won't start at all.

I called the installers (Hometown Heating) who installed the brand new furnace less than two years ago with a five year warranty and they want COD to come look at it. When I asked why I have to pay for something that is under warranty, I was told that it was because I'm a new customer. Yes, two years means a new customer.

I'm getting very cold and very irate.

Thank you.
 
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Old 02-02-07, 03:21 PM
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To bleed the pump if it is a Suntec pump with a bleed port on it. It also would apply to Webster and Danfoss but the bleeders are in a different location. It is easier with a piece of hose to slip over the bleeder port because otherwise it makes a mess. Start the burner and open the bleeder with the hose in a container. It may take more than one run cycle to fully bleed the pump. You will see foam and a foamy stream before you see a solid stream of fuel. You need to have a solid stream of noting but fuel before you are finished. If the burner locks out and you are not finished, close the bleeder and wait a few minutes until you can reset the control again. As soon as the stream is solid, close the bleeder and the flame should start up immediately. Anything other than the above description can indicate other problems and may not be a DIY job.

Ken
 
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Old 02-02-07, 03:54 PM
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The oil burner is a Riello 40 Series Model F5.

WOO HOOOOOOO!

There is a housing around the items I needed to access. Once I looked in the manual and the exploded view of the unit, I was able to see the "bleeding nozzle" or "valve". So, I removed the housing and there was that little bleeder, just like my brakes!

So, I followed the rest of your directions: cycle the system and allow the fuel to bleed out, when it shuts off, i close the valve. cycle, close, cycle, close. cycle until the fuel came out in a steady stream!!!

If you ever use citronella candles that come in the metal buckets, don't throw away the bucket. It's perfect for this job.

Thanks so much.

Cas
 

Last edited by Forensics; 02-02-07 at 04:58 PM. Reason: changed content
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Old 02-02-07, 05:28 PM
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I did not mention that burner because it is less popular and slightly different than most American burners. It is a great burner ad apparently, you got it to bleed and run. Some Riellos don't have the bleeder installed, just a plug. We add bleeder ports to those burners when we do service, but if yours didn't have it, you would have been in a further quandry. Hopefully you won't have further problems with it.

Ken
 
 

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