Rybolt “octopus” furnace removal

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Old 09-27-07, 07:13 AM
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Rybolt “octopus” furnace removal

I have a Rybolt “octopus” gravity-style coal-fired furnace
that’s been converted to natural gas, complete with asbestos-wrapped ductwork. My house was built in 1900. I would like to remove the ancient “octopus” & replace it with a modern, forced-air gas furnace. We can install the new furnace & ductwork ourselves, but we are concerned about removing the old dinosaur. Any advice? The inside of the original combustion chamber looks to be multiple pieces that might slide together, but even if we disassemble everything possible, some of the parts could weigh hundreds of pounds. I’m also a little concerned about the asbestos. Do I need to hire a hazardous-waste approved contractor to remove & dispose of the ductwork?
Thanks.
Len
 
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Old 09-27-07, 08:39 AM
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Wink

Do I need to hire a hazardous-waste approved contractor to remove & dispose of the ductwork?
Id say check code for where you are as to what you have to do to it.
Now the furnace First check and see if you have sand on the top of the main plenum . Take that all off then you can take off the outside wrap around. You say many units like inside the furnace. I take it that it is then a cast iron furnace. Each part will just lift off the other part then . If to big to handle a good sledge hammer to each piece and you should have a small piece to carry out.

Have fun
 
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Old 09-29-07, 08:14 AM
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Octopus removal

I am just a novice, but I did this recently. I removed all the ducts intact and took them outside where I removed the asbestos tape under water. I wadded up all the soggy old tape and residue, put it in several "approved" plastic bags and took them to my local hazzardous waste facility, where it was accepted for free. I think it amounted to one bagful. Of course, I used the right safety gear for the job. There is alot of information about this on the Internet.

My octo furnace had a sheetmetal shroud, and underneath was a very solid, two chamber steel structure. It did not respond at all to a sledge hammer (it was made of welded plates, not cast), so I had to use an angle grinder to cut it apart. I pulled out the heat exchanger, which was made of fire bricks and got a friend to help me with the heaviest, lower part. That must have weighed about 250. I hauled the scrap with all the ducts to a local yard and got $50. If you don't have a pickup, you can put an ad in Craigslist, and someone will be over to get your metal in about 10 minutes.

I am also installing my new furnace. That has been pretty easy, so far. Keep us posted on your progress and good luck.

Matthew
 
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Old 12-06-08, 09:55 AM
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wish I could have seen it, before its end

I have an old Rybolt coal furnace that I still use, It was made in Chillicothe Ohio. I love the quality of this old furnace. I would like to find another one to put in my garage. I hope your removal went well and you paid the proper respect to your proof of the old American quality that was the standard years ago. Havent found it in the products from China that I keep finding.


Have a good day
 

Last edited by ryboltforever; 12-06-08 at 10:01 AM. Reason: word left out
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